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Speech 104

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This power point covers the topic claims.

This power point covers the topic claims.


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  • 1. UNDERSTANDING THE CLAIM
  • 2. DEFINITION AND PURPOSE • A claim is a statement worded against the status quo that is the focus of an argument. • A claim is not a question. • Your are either for or against the statement. • A claim is against the states quo. • The claim has to be worded against the current policy. • The claim is the focus of the argument. • It is the conclusion the arguer is trying to convince his or her audience to believe.
  • 3. TYPES OF CLAIMS • There are three types of claims: • Claim of Fact • Claim of Value • Claim of Policy • Each type of claim have a unique purpose and explores a different argumentative topic.
  • 4. CLAIM OF FACT • Something is, was, or will be. • Example: Global warming is a threat that must be addressed.
  • 5. CLAIM OF VALUE • Something is good or bad, desirable or undesirable. • Example: Hunting of animals is a barbaric practice.
  • 6. CLAIM OF POLICY • Something should or ought to be done. • Example: Obamacare should be repealed because is it adding to the U.S. deficit and debt.
  • 7. ARGUMENTATIVE BURDENS • Each person in an argument has distinct responsibilities known as burdens. • Burden of Proof • Burden of Presumption • Burden of Rebuttal
  • 8. BURDEN OF PROOF • He argues in the favor of the claim. • providing “good and sufficient” reasons to accept the claim. • “He who asserts, must prove.” - Aristotle
  • 9. BURDEN OF PRESUMPTION • • • • Providing reason to maintain the status quo. Reject the claim. Presented second in an argument. This side has the obligation to argue for the current system.
  • 10. BURDEN OF REBUTTAL • The obligation of both side to respond to one another. • Silence equals consent. If you don’t respond you are implying the other side is right.
  • 11. ARGUMENTATIVE BURDENS (RESPONSIBILITIES OF BOTH SIDES) • Affirmative side (agreeing with the claim) • Burden of proof • Burden of rebuttal • Negative side (disagreeing with the claim) • Burden of presumption • Burden of rebuttal
  • 12. CONCLUSION • Now that we understand arguing with the use of claims we can argue in a civil manner and get our point across correctly and more efficiently. • Claims have helped society to progress. Claims have empowered people to argue against the states quo and better our world through important arguments in a mannerly excepted fashion. • Once we have stated our claim it is clear and simple what we are arguing about therefore arguments will end with greater and more specific results.

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