Part 2


1.   Awarding Institution       City University London
2.   Teaching Institution       Ravensbourne College of De...
Part 2



This programme enables students to acquire the technical knowledge and
professional skills necessary to enter th...
Part 2


9. Teaching, Learning and Assessment Strategies

The teaching, learning and assessment strategies of the course i...
Part 2


These modes of learning are increasingly supported by the use of Learn@rave,
Ravensbourne’s Moodle Virtual Learni...
Part 2


unit makes use of formative and summative assessment. These provide timely
and appropriate formal and informal fe...
Part 2


•   Specific professional and generic skills, including skills of investigation and
    enquiry, oral and written...
Part 2


Knowledge and                   Learning and teaching methods
Understanding                   Learning and teachi...
Part 2


Values and Attitudes            Learning and teaching methods
B1 Problems                     Students develop va...
Part 2



Skills (Subject                Learning and teaching methods
Specific/Professional)         Professional and pra...
Part 2


Skills (Transferable)            Learning and teaching methods
                                 Students develop ...
Part 2


11. Admissions and APEL

This programme will recruit principally from the FdSc Broadcast Technology cluster
at Ra...
Part 2


12. Assessment Regulations

In common with all Ravensbourne honours degree courses, this course is subject to
the...
Part 2


13. Unit List

          Code     Title                                               Credit Value
          COM3...
Part 2


14. Course Diagram



Full Time Mode:

Level 3
                                                                  ...
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Part Time Mode:

In the part-time mode, students will take 2 years to complete the honours degree.
They will comp...
Part 2
15. Primary Learning Outcome Map




                                                                 A1: Context
 ...
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Appendix A

Cluster Learning Outcome to EC Learning Outcome Mapping
Engineering Council General and Specific Lear...
Part 2


Appendix B

Cluster Units to EC Learning Outcome Mapping
Engineering Council General and Specific Learning Outcom...
Part 2
Appendix C




             19
Part 2


Please note, this specification provides a concise summary of the main features of
the programme and the learning...
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BTC BSc Programme Specification

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BTC BSc Programme Specification

  1. 1. Part 2 1. Awarding Institution City University London 2. Teaching Institution Ravensbourne College of Design and Communic- ation 3. Programme Accredited By 4. Final Award and Title Broadcast Technology Cluster (BTC): BSc (Hons) Broadcast Technology (Audio) (BAT) BSc (Hons) Broadcast Technology (Systems) (BET) BSc (Hons) Broadcast Technology (Computing) (BIT) BSc (Hons) Broadcast Technology (Outside Broadcast) (BOT) 5. QAA Benchmarking QAA - The framework for higher education Group(s) qualifications in England, Wales and Northern and external Ireland references QAA Code of Practice QAA Engineering Subject Benchmark QAA Communication, Media, Film and Cultural Studies Subject Benchmark ECUK UK-SPEC (Standard for Professional Engineering Competence) IET Handbook of Learning Outcomes EAB Generic Learning Outcomes EAB Specified Learning Outcomes Skillset National Occupational Standards for Broadcast Media Technology DIUS : Further Education - Leitch Review of Skills The Cox Review of Creativity in Business - HM Treasury 6. Date of introduction / Sept 2009 start of proposed new validation period 7. Overview of Programme Structure The broadcast industry is powered by cutting-edge technology. The four pathways in this top-up provide vocational education appropriate to a professional working in this sector. Students graduating from this course could expect to work in a variety of areas in the broadcast industry from systems design, installation, maintenance and support, to studio and location production, post-production and transmission. 1
  2. 2. Part 2 This programme enables students to acquire the technical knowledge and professional skills necessary to enter the broadcasting industry at graduate level. Designed primarily as a progression route from the FdSc Broadcast Technology Cluster courses, the BSc (Hons) Broadcast Technology top-up offers students the opportunity to develop ‘practical’ skills into ‘professional’ skills in their area of specialism. Foundation Degree (FdSc) students would normally progressed onto the connected pathway in the Honours Degree (BSc): FdSc BSc (Hons) Broadcast Audio Technology (BAT) Broadcast Technology (Audio) Broadcast Technology (BET) Broadcast Technology (Systems) Broadcast Information Technology (BIT) Broadcast Technology (Computing) Outside Broadcast Technology (BOT) Broadcast Technology (Outside Broadcast) This course is a one-year full time ‘top-up’ BSc (Hons) programmes with a part-time learning option. 8. Educational Aims Through the integration of academic and work-based learning, this course aims to enable students to: 1. Develop a range of professional problem solving and project management skills in this discipline as relevant to employment in their chosen sector of the broadcasting industry; 2. Further develop their understanding of key technological and theoretical concepts in this discipline area; 3. Develop skills in research and analysis and to encourage critical reflection, intellectual risk taking and the development of effective and appropriate communication methods; 4. Encourage independent and critical thinking and develop transferable skills and competencies enabling life-long learning; 5. Further develop knowledge of and experience in collaborative working methods and processes within an industrially focused multidisciplinary environment. 2
  3. 3. Part 2 9. Teaching, Learning and Assessment Strategies The teaching, learning and assessment strategies of the course is developed through a considered process of learning design supported at the institutional and faculty level. The result is a learner centred and industry informed approach to the choice of modes, activities, sequences and tools used. Learning is facilitated by permanent teaching staff, supported by sessional staff and visiting speakers who are practising professionals and add to the industry perspective of the course. The course is designed to inculcate a range of critical and vocationally focused skills that situate individual learning within the context of professional practice. Progression through the programme builds the individual capabilities of self-directed learning that underpin continual professional and academic development. This is embedded into the design of the course as a whole, and is supported by cross college units in Personal and Professional Development, Contextual Studies and Enterprise & Entrepreneurship. These particularly support the broadening, contextualisation and synthesis of learning with practice as well as the development of crucial inter-personal, intra-personal and academic skills such as critical thinking, research, team-working and professional communication. Considerable value is placed on work related learning. This is supported through the simulation of real world scenarios in projects and through industrial exposure through work placements and case studies. A particular emphasis is placed on the development and application of professional and practical skills through project based learning, involving a considerable amount of self-directed learning. In this approach, students respond to project briefs designed to foster creative, technical and academic skills while progressively introducing professional contexts and constraints. This approach is student-centred, encourages deep approaches to learning, builds problem solving ability and integrates academic with professional learning. Collaborative projects and activities are included to encourage team working skills and peer learning. This includes working with students from other courses where relevant and practical. Project briefs set out the context of the unit and project, the intended learning outcomes and the assessment criteria against which students’ performance will be judged. Lectures, workshops, tutorials, practical sessions and guest lectures by visiting practitioners are used to raise learners’ awareness and support them in developing their understanding of critical knowledge within broadcast engineering and associated contexts. These are also used to model and support the development of critical engagement with texts, concepts, and the professional practice of relevant individuals and organisations. These normally include interaction and questioning from students. These also provide the opportunity to bring together students from different disciplines and courses, highlighting common critical themes and issues and exploring different perspectives. The new learning space in Greenwich will provide opportunities to extend this practice, for example by including high profile and large-scale events. 3
  4. 4. Part 2 These modes of learning are increasingly supported by the use of Learn@rave, Ravensbourne’s Moodle Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). For example lecture notes, podcasts and additional references and learning materials and forums are used to provide more flexible access to course-related material and to extend the learning opportunities. Tutor and student led seminars encourage students to develop their own position and direction in relation to this knowledge and understanding and also encourage peer learning and support. Small group tutorials are particularly used to support students in reflecting on the development of their work and contextualising this in relation to the brief, learning outcomes and wider contexts such as professional practice and commercial considerations. Workshops and demonstrations are particularly used to provide expert instruction in the application of professionally relevant skills and technology. The design and sequencing of these modes of learning are used to develop the critical reflection on practice that is central to the aims and design of the course and preparing learners to succeed and contribute in their industry. This is further embedded through the design of projects that emphasise the contextualisation of learners’ responses to briefs supported by research. The practical experience gained encourages the testing, development and internalisation of understanding through the creative application of conceptual, technical and professional tools. The course is designed to scaffold students’ development so that they progressively find their own direction and use their knowledge and understanding to inform the application of their skills. This is re-enforced by the development of their dissertation and final major project. Self-direction and critical reflection on their work, and the positioning of this within professional, commercial and theoretical contexts is vital in implementing their career plans. Well-established forms of learning and teaching are increasingly supplemented, supported and extended by on line materials and activities through a range of blended e-Learning resources and activities. These often involve the use of the VLE, for example to provide access to course information, briefs, learning materials and activities such as forums which support learners in personalising their learning and sharing this with peers. Applying learning from JISC funded projects undertaken by the college the use of the VLE is increasingly related to external tools and communities. For example, tools such as wikis and blogs are used to encourage critical reflection, peer learning and collaboration. They support learners’ progression along a continuum from private reflection to public and professional representation and engagement with communities of practice. To ensure that our learners continue to be successful and employable the course is designed to prepare them for the rapidly changing social and technological context in which they will work. A vital part of this is to equip them with the knowledge and skills to be able to understand the use of digital technology in their professional practice and as lifelong, independent and inter-dependent learners. Assessment is of primary importance to the learning process, and each project and 4
  5. 5. Part 2 unit makes use of formative and summative assessment. These provide timely and appropriate formal and informal feedback to students. Formative feedback plays a particularly important role in encouraging critical reflection and increasingly independent learning. Students are encouraged to be active participants in this process, through panel presentations for example, where individual and group work is discussed and reviewed by peers and staff members. Assessment criteria reflect the specific brief and the overall aims of the programme, and refer to relevant professional standards, where appropriate. The following assessment methods will be particularly used: • Essays, examinations and dissertation are mainly used to assess the level of critical, contextual, analytical and written communication skills and knowledge. • Technical reports are particularly used to develop and assess the skills of summarising, analysing and communicating the process of researching and contextualising work. • Presentations are used to measure and develop verbal communication and presentation skills. Group presentations are used to measure the ability to coordinate different sources of information into one coherent event. • Professional engineering skills are predominantly assessed through the success and appropriateness to brief of practical lab exercises and activities. Where relevant to the unit, technical skills will be assessed through the project components and usually supported by reflective logs and technical reports. • Project proposals and reflective documents/logs are used to measure the student’s abilities to set and meet goals and are part of a project development process – and key to assessing units that involve self-initiated working. Overall, assessment across the programme will focus on the following areas: • Breadth and depth of subject knowledge and awareness of the history and context(s) of that knowledge. • Critical reflection on issues related to professional practice, on new knowledge and understanding, and on students' own and others' performance against agreed criteria, including the capacity to deploy and evaluate evidence and to express the outcomes of such reflection clearly and fluently. • Critical analysis of fields of knowledge, concepts and engineering practices, including the ability to contextualise the analysis and engage in critical debate through discursive argument. • Specific professional values and attitudes, including professional and industrial contexts, and broader business, enterprise, and innovation contexts. 5
  6. 6. Part 2 • Specific professional and generic skills, including skills of investigation and enquiry, oral and written communicative skills, the use of a range of technology for accessing data, resources, contacts and literature, and developing creative solutions to relevant problems. The course team recognise that it is critical to continually develop and innovate in our approach to learning and teaching. We will respond to the ongoing evaluation of delivery through processes such as Annual Course Monitoring, as well as to input from industry on how well we are meeting their changing needs. This is in line with the college’s mission and is vital to meet the needs of our increasingly diverse learners and prepare them to fulfil their potential in their chosen field/s. The course will also develop their approach to learning and teaching in order to take advantage of the new learning space and respond to changes in our learners, the ways in which they need to access learning, and the demands of the industries in which they will work. The overall aims of the course will be met through inclusive, personalised and flexible approaches to learning and teaching that support: collaborative and cross disciplinary working; engagement with digital and networked technology as part of the learning and creative process; the development of skills and approaches needed for enterprise and innovation; recognition of how learning outcomes relate to the needs of the creative industries; balancing depth and breadth in learning and professional development; and the development of the skills learners need to succeed as critically reflective professionals. 10. Learning Outcomes The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, qualities, skills and other attributes in the following areas: 6
  7. 7. Part 2 Knowledge and Learning and teaching methods Understanding Learning and teaching on the course tends to be A1 Context primarily project based (see Practical and Professional Skills below). This is supported Key operational and though the development of the student’s engineering professional knowledge and understanding by varied learning practices, legal, ethical and and teaching methods which may include as regulatory frameworks appropriate: project briefings, lectures, (staff relevant to media and and student led) group seminars, technical or communications industries practical workshops, demonstrations, individual or group tutorials and self directed A2 Technical study by the student. Relevant mathematical Learning is facilitated by well-qualified and methods and applied science experienced permanent teaching staff and by leading to electronic, sessional staff and visiting speakers who are information, communication practising professionals and bring an important and signal theory as industry perspective to the course. Traditional appropriate to Honours modes of delivery may be supported where Degree level professional appropriate by e-learning and/or resource-based practice in this sector learning. Assessment A3 Project Knowledge and understanding are assessed through a blend of short essays, examinations, Research and apply relevant reports, critical analysis, and individual technologies and the presentations, and through their application in techniques required to solve practical projects in a manner appropriate to engineering problems each unit of delivery. encountered in a project. 7
  8. 8. Part 2 Values and Attitudes Learning and teaching methods B1 Problems Students develop values and attitudes primarily through self-directed project activity that Identify and specify problems progressively introduces professional contexts. and conduct research to find the most appropriate Most learning takes place during the projects tools/methods for their and through students’ critical and reflective resolution response to these. The focus is on problem- solving within group and individual projects. B2 Professionalism Assessment Interact effectively within a Values and attitudes are assessed within team, exchanging appropriate units throughout the course primarily information and ideas and through its application in practical projects in a modifying responses manner appropriate to each unit of delivery. appropriately B3 Independence Take responsibility for own learning with minimal direction Skills (Cognitive and Learning and teaching methods Intellectual) Intellectual skills are gained primarily through C1 Analysis lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials and self-directed study but the delivery of some Research and apply optimum elements will be integrated with practical and mathematical methods, professional skills in project-based learning. In scientific principles and particular, project based learning stimulates software to analyse analysis, contextual, problem solving, creative electronics and information thinking, critical analysis and personal reflection. communications engineering problems The contextual elements of the course enable students to develop theoretical and critical C2 Application frameworks in which they can locate their practice. Critically analyse existing Assessment systems or processes and Students are assessed through a variety of design or evaluate solutions means including essays, reports and through the synthesis of presentations. Some elements are assessed ideas and methods through their application in submitted project materials. This may include rationales, C3 Context background research, development materials and/or evidence of critical reflection on the Analyse and reflect on their process of development in addition to practical own work with reference to material. academic and work related frameworks 8
  9. 9. Part 2 Skills (Subject Learning and teaching methods Specific/Professional) Professional and practical skills are gained D1 Operations primarily through project-based learning. This often involves the simulation of activities that Show competence in take place in industry. management of engineering projects and the application Supported by staff, students work on project of mathematical and briefs designed to foster creative, technical and engineering techniques, academic skills within professional contexts and taking account of industrial real world constraints. This approach is student and commercial constraints centred, encourages deep learning, develops problem solving ability, and integrates academic D2 Design with professional learning. Students increasingly take responsibility for their own learning. Some Design or adapt a system, projects may involve students from other component or process that courses. employs components, construction methods and Projects are supported by briefings, lectures, programming languages as workshops, group seminars and student self- appropriate to implement directed study. Learning is facilitated by innovative solutions while permanent teaching staff and by sessional staff independently managing and visiting speakers who are practising time and resources professionals and bring an important industry perspective to the course. These methods may D3 Testing be supported where appropriate by e-learning and/or resource based learning. Select relevant test and Assessment measurement equipment and Students are assessed primarily through the diagnostic software to submission of practical materials. Students analyse system performance undertake a variety of engineering and and ensure fitness for technology tests. Students may also be required purpose to submit reflective logs explaining key points in both the technical and creative process and justifying decisions made with respect to the brief. 9
  10. 10. Part 2 Skills (Transferable) Learning and teaching methods Students develop transferable skills primarily E1 Reflection through self-directed project activity that progressively introduces professional contexts. Critically evaluate own strengths and weaknesses, Though most learning takes place during the and develop own criteria and projects and through students’ critical and judgement reflective response to these, this aspect of learning is supported by a Personal and E2 Informatics Professional Development unit. The unit also prepares students for work and encourages Manage information in a them to start to explore professional and career range of media, analysing development. appropriate sources and Assessment technologies Transferable skills are assessed within appropriate units throughout the course, and in E3 Communication particular through the submission of Personal and Professional Development Files. These files Communicate ideas and (containing a learning plan, reflective information effectively in commentary and evidence-base) are developed visual, oral and written forms within the Personal and Professional that is appropriate, literate, Development unit and provide evidence of work numerate and coherent for a and learning carried out across the course. For variety of audiences instance, evidence of personal development achieved through research, design development and realisation; responses to briefs; and evidence of project management. Students are also assessed through peer and self- assessment The learning outcomes are mapped to both the QAA Communication Media, Film and Cultural Studies Subject Benchmark and the ECUK (Engineering Council UK) UK-SPEC (Standard for Professional Engineering Competence) who’s specific learning outcomes disseminate into the following reference documents: • QAA Engineering Subject Benchmark • IET Handbook of Learning Outcomes • EAB (Engineering Accreditation Board) General Learning Outcomes • EAB Specified Learning Outcomes See Appendices A and B for Engineering Council UK and QAA learning outcome unit mappings. 10
  11. 11. Part 2 11. Admissions and APEL This programme will recruit principally from the FdSc Broadcast Technology cluster at Ravensbourne College. Normally, the prerequisites for entry to the top-up course are: • Successfully completed FdSc Broadcast Audio Technology, FdSc Broadcast Technology, FdSc Broadcast Information Technology or FdSc Outside Broadcast Technology; • A minimum of 2.2 profile (Grade C) at level 2 (calculated by weighted average); • That no more than 3 years will have expired since completion of the Foundation Degree, FdSc Broadcast Technology cluster. The courses may also recruit external candidates with similar qualifications who may come from a wide range of backgrounds. Applications are positively welcomed from mature students, those with relevant work experience, and those who may not necessarily possess the formal entry qualifications. External applicants will normally be expected to attend for interview where they may complete a technical assessment. Students will be selected according to the criteria set out in the College Procedure for the Admission of Students and Guidance Notes for Selecting Candidates for interview. When appropriate the College’s Accreditation of Prior Learning Policy and Procedure will be used to assess applicants at interview. A key criterion for entry is evidence of commitment and motivation to study at honours degree level in the subject area. Applications from candidates without standard qualifications may be considered on the basis of prior experiential learning, provided they can demonstrate that they have the necessary experience and the ability to benefit from and succeed on the programme. Where an applicant’s first language is not English, proof of competence in English will be required. This will normally take the form of an IELTS score of a minimum of 6.5 or equivalent, which has been achieved within the last 18 months prior to commencement of the course. 11
  12. 12. Part 2 12. Assessment Regulations In common with all Ravensbourne honours degree courses, this course is subject to the Academic Regulations for the Awards of BA and BSc. In summary, in order to complete a unit, a student must successfully complete all the assessment specified for that unit. In order to achieve the award, a student must successfully complete all the Level 3 Units (totalling 120 credits at HE level 3) in section 13 below. In certain circumstances, the Examination Board may at its discretion choose to permit performance in one area to compensate for underachievement in another subject to the provisions of the Academic Regulations for the Awards of BA and BSc. However, there is no automatic right to such compensation. The final degree is classified on the basis of the level three units only. Classification is determined by the average of the final results achieved in each of the final year units weighted by their credit size, according to the banding below: Classification Grade Percentage Banding First Class Honours A 100 – 70 Upper Second Honours B 60 – 69 Lower Second Class Honours C 50 – 59 Third Class Honours D 40 – 49 12
  13. 13. Part 2 13. Unit List Code Title Credit Value COM301 Dissertation 20 COM302 Enterprise and Entrepreneurship 15 COM303 Personal and Professional Development 10 BAT304 Acoustics and Multi-Channel Audio Level 3 BET304 Telecommunications and Transmission 15 BIT304 Servers and Software BOT304 Communications and Links BTC305 Broadcast Signal Processing 15 BTC306 Engineering Mathematics 15 BTC307 Engineering Project 30 Total 120 Course-specific content is differentiated at the project level. Much of the core technical content is common across the four pathways, but students focus their learning through the application of this wider knowledge in specialist projects. 13
  14. 14. Part 2 14. Course Diagram Full Time Mode: Level 3 BTC305: Broadcast Signal 10 credits COM303: Personal and Professional Development 15 credits BTC306: Engineering Mathematics 30 credits BTC307: Engineering Project Processing 15 credits Term 1 BAT304: Acoustics and Multi- Channel Audio BET304: Telecommunications Term 2 and Transmission BIT304: Servers and Software BOT304: Communications and Links 15 credits COM302: Enterprise and Entrepreneurship 15 credits Term 3 14
  15. 15. Part 2 Part Time Mode: In the part-time mode, students will take 2 years to complete the honours degree. They will complete the programme in the sequence Level 3a, Level 3b from the diagram below. Students will be required to attend at most 2 days per week, and much of the unit learning material will be made available on the College VLE to incorporate a distance-learning approach. In some cases, part-time students may be issued a slightly different project brief to those students in the full-time mode to improve connections with other units and optimise management of resources. Level 3a Level3b BTC305: Broadcast Signal 10 credits COM303: Personal and Professional Development 15 credits BTC306: Engineering Mathematics 30 credits BTC107: Engineering Project Processing 15 credits Term 1 BAT304: Acoustics and Multi- Channel Audio BET304: Telecommunications Term 2 and Transmission BIT304: Servers and Software BOT304: Communications and Links 15 credits COM302: Enterprise and Entrepreneurship 15 credits Term 3 15
  16. 16. Part 2 15. Primary Learning Outcome Map A1: Context A2: Technical A3: Project B1: Problems B2: Professionalism B3: Independence C1: Analysis C2: Application C3: Context D1: Operations D2: Design D3: Testing E1: Reflection E2: Informatics E3: Communication Code Title COM301 Dissertation X X X X X COM302 Enterprise & Innovation X X X X X COM303 Personal and Professional Development X X X X X BAT304 Acoustics and Multi-Channel Audio Level 3 BET304 Telecommunications and Transmission X X X X X BIT304 Servers and Software BOT304 Communications and Links BTC305 Broadcast Signal Processing X X X X X BTC306 Engineering Mathematics X X X X X BTC307 Engineering Project X X X X X 16
  17. 17. Part 2 Appendix A Cluster Learning Outcome to EC Learning Outcome Mapping Engineering Council General and Specific Learning Outcomes (EAB Designates) A1: Context A2: Technical A3: Project B1: Problems B2: Professionalism B3: Independence C1: Analysis C2: Application C3: Context D1: Operations D2: Design D3: Testing E1: Reflection E2: Informatics E3: Communication Ref Criteria No Knowledge & Understanding KU1 X X EAB General LOs KU2 X KU3 X Intellectual Abilities IA1 X IA2 X IA3 X Practical Skills PS1 X X X General Transferable Skills GT1 X X X X X X Underpinning Science & Maths US1I X US2I X Engineering Analysis E1I X X E2I X X E3I X X E4I X X Design D1I X D2I X EAB Specific LOs D3 X D4I X D5I X D6I X Economic, Social & S1 X X Environmental Context S4 X S5 X Engineering Practice P1I X P2I X P3I X P4I X P6I X P7I X P8I X Comm Media Benchmark General (p.19) 8.2.1 X X 8.2.2 X X 8.2.3 X X 8.2.4 X 8.2.5 X 8.2.6 X 8.2.7 X X 8.2.8 X X 8.2.11 X 8.2.12 X X 17
  18. 18. Part 2 Appendix B Cluster Units to EC Learning Outcome Mapping Engineering Council General and Specific Learning Outcomes (EAB Designates) LEVEL 3 COM301 COM302 COM303 BOT304 BIT304 BET304 BAT304 BTC305 BTC306 BTC307 Criteria Ref No Knowledge & Understanding KU1 X X X X KU2 X X X EAB General LOs KU3 X X X Intellectual Abilities IA1 X IA2 X X X IA3 X X X Practical Skills PS1 X X X X X X X General Transferable Skills GT1 X X X X X X X Underpinning Science & Maths US1I X X X US2I X X X Engineering Analysis E1I X X X E2I X X X X E3I X X X X E4I X X X X Design D1I X X X D2I X X X X X D3 X X X X X EAB Specific LOs D4I X X X D5I X X D6I X X X X X Economic, Social & S1 X X X Environmental Context S4 X X X S5 X X X Engineering Practice P1I X P2I X X X P3I X X X P4I X X X P6I X P7I X P8I X X X 18
  19. 19. Part 2 Appendix C 19
  20. 20. Part 2 Please note, this specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if he/she takes full advantage of the learning opportunities that are provided. More detailed information on the learning outcomes, content and teaching, learning and assessment methods of each unit can be found in the Course Handbook, Unit Descriptors and Project Briefs. The accuracy of the information contained in this document is reviewed by the College and may be checked by the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education. 20

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