Organizational effectiveness

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Organizational effectiveness

  1. 1. Organizational EffectivenessRUNNING HEAD: ORGANIZATIONAL EFFECTIVENESSOrganizational EffectivenessJuan RamirezCJA/474April 22, 2013Kenneth Rosa1
  2. 2. Organizational EffectivenessOrganizational EffectivenessOrganizational effectiveness is a tool manager’s use to measure how effective they; andtheir organizations are at achieving outcomes and creating value. Organizational effectivenesscan be very difficult to measure in an organization. Organizations can be diverse and very large.Also one organization can have multiple goals and perform many activities at the same time.Managers must decide which indicators they want to measure in order to determine theeffectiveness of their organization. There are three approaches managers can use in evaluatingeffectiveness. They are the external resource approach Control; the internal systems approachInnovation; and the technical approach Efficiency. Each approach has something to offer but allfocus on different parts of the organization.Officers drive the overall effectiveness of public safety organizations and represent theiragencies’ most valuable assets. Employees’ level of engagement forms the foundation for thissuccess. Personnel make the difference in life-and-death situations by expending energy andeffort to protect citizens’ safety every day. Effective officer performance helps lower crimelevels and increase citizens’ trust in the police to improve quality of life. Law enforcementorganizations face the challenge of identifying factors that impact engagement and performance,proactively anticipating and rectifying problems that can affect individual and, ultimately,organizational effectiveness (2011). The internal systems approach allows managers to evaluatehow well their organization functions and how smooth it operates. An organization needs to beable to rapidly create products, make services available; and speed up decision making in orderto adapt and respond quickly to the forever changing environment.Police departments have battled with the age-old problems of improving effectiveness,improving the quality of service to the public, responding to the ever changing environment, andimproving the quality of life in the workplace while living with long-term resource scarcities.Development and adoption of an organizational strategy as the foundation of short-term and2
  3. 3. Organizational Effectivenessstrategic long-term planning. When organizations make changes to increase employee moraleand coordination this can have a direct impact on its ability to respond to the environment. Whenemployees are satisfied and happy departments work together better and this can help ensurehigh productivity. The problem with the internal systems approach is that the total output and theorganization’s relationship with the external environment are not evaluated. The technicalapproach allows managers to evaluate how efficiently an organization can convert some fixedamount of organizational skills into finished goods and services. Public safety requiressupervisors to maintain a certain level of command and control to ensure professionalism andaccountability. From the direct supervisor’s level, the study noted contradictory results in theeffectiveness of internal communication. Supervisors not only must understand the concepts andtechniques of effective evaluations but practice these skills in role-play situations to becomecomfortable in having potentially difficult conversations with personnel regarding performanceconcerns. A goal is for officers to see feedback as positive, not threatening, and to participatemore easily in uncomfortable conversations. Also, discussion must include two-way participationfrom both the supervisor and the employee. Performance must be viewed from differentperspectives, from formal after-action reports to impromptu conversations, with the same goal ofidentifying what can be learned. For professionals in law enforcement, feedback received todaymay change behavior and save the life of a citizen or teammate tomorrow (2011). Leaderswithin the organization supportive leadership enhances working relationship between leaders andtheir followers. According to Shah, (2011), this style of leadership enhances friendly workingenvironment for employees. This improves employees’ performance in their quest to administerjustice for all in a fair and appropriate manner. This culture has proved to be effective in manyorganizations that administer criminal justice. Effective leadership is essential in improving theperformance of the organization. Organizational culture revolves around leadership’scommitment and participation in the tasks of the organization, (Lock & Crawford, 1999).3
  4. 4. Organizational EffectivenessEffective leadership is therefore, affected by culture which in turn impacts on the performance ofthe organization. Effective leaders must therefore, be supportive of the employees, mustcollaborate and should also be able to build team culture.The concepts of power and leadership have been and will continue to be interconnected.While an individual may exert power without being a leader, an individual cannot be a leaderwithout having power. In organizational settings, leaders must exert power to achieveindividual, team, and organizational goals. Leaders must be able to influence their followers toachieve greater performance; their superiors and peers to make important decisions; andstakeholders to ensure the vitality of the organization. Managers achieve organizational goals bymanaging intellectual capital in order to get the most out of organizational resources. Animportant part of this process is monitoring performance and outcomes. Organizational controlstructure is a distribution of means used by an organization to elicit the performances it needsand to check whether the quantities and qualities of such performances are in accord withorganizational specifications. The means used differ in their availability to the organization andin the performances they elicit as judged by service to organizational goals and needs.Organizations are social units that serve specific purposes. They are planned, deliberatelystructured, constantly and self-consciously reviewing their performances, and restructuringthemselves accordingly. Regardless of the negative connotation of the word control, it mustexist or there is no organization at all. In its most basic form, an organization is two or morepeople working together to reach a goal. Whether an organization is highly bureaucratic orchanging and self-organizing, the organization must exist for some reason, some purpose, somemission implicit or explicit or it isnt an organization at all. The organization must have somegoal. Identifying this goal requires some form of planning, informal or formal.Overall it is difficult to measure organizational effectiveness. According to the webmodule on General Management and Organization (2004) many managers have a hard time4
  5. 5. Organizational Effectivenessmeasuring organizational effectiveness based on characteristics that are not subject to hardquantitative measurement. Top executives at some the biggest and leading companies today arefinding new ways to measure effectiveness, through indicators such as customer delight andemployee satisfaction.5
  6. 6. Organizational EffectivenessReferencesBal, V. Campbell, M. Steed, Judith, Meddings, K. The Role of Power in. (2008).Retrieved from http://www.ccl.org/leadership/pdf/research/roleOfPower.pdfLock, P & Crawford, J. (1999). The relationship between commitment and organizationalculture, subculture, leadership style and job satisfaction in organizational change anddevelopment. Leadership & Organization Development Journal, 20(7), 365-373.Phibbs, W. M. (2011). Analyzing Organizational Performance. Retrieved fromhttp://www.fbi.gov/stats-services/publications/law-enforcement-bulletin/december-2011/analyzing-organizational-performanceShah, S., Iqbal, J., Razaq, A., Yemen, M., Sabir, S & Khan, M. (2011). Influential Roleof Culture on leadership Effectiveness and Organizational Performance; InformationManagement & Business Review, 3(2), 127-132. Retrieved fromhttp://www.oracle.com/us/media1/steps-effective-leadership-dev-1657106.pdf6
  7. 7. Organizational EffectivenessReferencesBal, V. Campbell, M. Steed, Judith, Meddings, K. The Role of Power in. (2008).Retrieved from http://www.ccl.org/leadership/pdf/research/roleOfPower.pdfLock, P & Crawford, J. (1999). The relationship between commitment and organizationalculture, subculture, leadership style and job satisfaction in organizational change anddevelopment. Leadership & Organization Development Journal, 20(7), 365-373.Phibbs, W. M. (2011). Analyzing Organizational Performance. Retrieved fromhttp://www.fbi.gov/stats-services/publications/law-enforcement-bulletin/december-2011/analyzing-organizational-performanceShah, S., Iqbal, J., Razaq, A., Yemen, M., Sabir, S & Khan, M. (2011). Influential Roleof Culture on leadership Effectiveness and Organizational Performance; InformationManagement & Business Review, 3(2), 127-132. Retrieved fromhttp://www.oracle.com/us/media1/steps-effective-leadership-dev-1657106.pdf6

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