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Pissarro Presentation

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Transcript

  • 1. CPSC 344 Team Pissarro
  • 2. The Alarm Clock
    • Our motivation:
    • Most alarm clocks are difficult to use
    • Setting the time can be cumbersome
    • Our objective (to start):
    • Designing an easy-to-use clock interface
    • Creating a clock that would appeal to many users.
  • 3. The Alarm Clock
    • Original idea:
    BUT: When it comes to functions, how much is too much? MP3! Night Light! WIFI Glowing buttons Screen-savers Photos Internet Calendar The Über Clock!
  • 4. Back to Basics
    • Evaluation methods: interviews and questionnaires
    • Results: The ÜBER Alarm Clock!
    • The only important functions:
      • A clock
      • An alarm or two
        • (one person wanted 31 alarms…  an outlier.)
  • 5. Prototype Brainstorm!
    • Our new objectives:
    • Creating a simple alarm clock
    • Presenting an easy-to-use interface
    • Now we knew what we wanted to include:
    • It was time to do some layout brainstorming!
    • Clock
    • Radio
    • Nap
    • Alarm (2)
  • 6. Brainstorming
    • Just a few examples…
    • Control Interfaces
    • Clock  Displays
  • 7. Prototype: Paper
    • Problems:
    • Too many switches (like too many functions?)
    • Cluttered
    • Confusing controls
  • 8. Prototype: Paper… and Foam!
    • What next?
    • Simplified controls
      • two options only
    • Fewer switches
    • Use the clock’s sides
  • 9. Prototype: Paper… and Foam!
    • Clock form
    • Paper and foam
    • Clock screen
    • Macromedia Flash
    • Decoration
      • (It is a “bedroom”, after all…)
  • 10. Evaluation
    • Medium-Fidelity Evaluation objectives:
    • Do our controls and layout make sense?
    • Are users able to solve tasks that we give?
    • How do they like the dial?
  • 11. Evaluation
    • Observation, think-aloud protocol
    • Feedback from users about physical interactions with the alarm clock prototype
    • Determined whether the mapping between functions and controls was intuitive
    • Follow-up interview
    • Users elaborated on their actions
    • Users reflected on the experience; some gave useful suggestions
  • 12. Evaluation
    • Observation, think-aloud protocol
    • Feedback from users about physical interactions with the alarm clock prototype
    • Determined whether the mapping between functions and controls was intuitive
    • Follow-up interview
    • Users elaborated on their actions
    • Users reflected on the experience; some gave useful suggestions
  • 13. Demo! Physical clock form
  • 14. Demo! Flash screen and controls
  • 15. The Six Tasks
    • Task #1: Switch from AM to FM
    • Task #2: Turn up the volume
    • Task #3: Set alarm 1 to 6:25 AM
    • Task #4: Set alarm 2 to 8:00 AM 
    • Task #5: Turn on alarm 1
    • Task #6: Set the wake mode to radio
  • 16. Results
    • Users initially were confused with the dial
    • After the first few tasks, users were able to complete the rest without prodding
    • Some users felt using the dial was tedious
    • Most users focused on the physical form, and not on the changes on the screen.
  • 17. Results
    • Users initially were confused with the dial
    • After the first few tasks, users were able to complete the rest without prodding
    • Some users felt using the dial was tedious
    • Most users focused on the physical form, and not on the changes on the screen.
  • 18. Results
    • Users initially were confused with the dial
    • After the first few tasks, users were able to complete the rest without prodding
    • Some users felt using the dial was tedious
    • Most users focused on the physical form, and not on the changes on the screen.
  • 19. Results
    • Users initially were confused with the dial
    • After the first few tasks, users were able to complete the rest without prodding
    • Some users felt using the dial was tedious
    • Most users focused on the physical form, and not on the changes on the screen.
  • 20. Recommendations
    • Connecting the form to the display
      • Give the users a more obvious indication of the changes they make, so they are given a better idea of what they are doing
    • Improve the prototype form
      • Create a more durable object
    • Throw out the dial!
      • A few users cited more familiarity with using buttons, and disliked the dial interface in comparison
    • or, Keep the dial!  
      • Make the connection between functions and the dial more intuitive by adding visual cues such as lines, arrows, or images
  • 21. Recommendations
    • Connecting the form to the display
      • Give the users a more obvious indication of the changes they make, so they are given a better idea of what they are doing
    • Improve the prototype form
      • Create a more durable object
    • Throw out the dial!
      • A few users cited more familiarity with using buttons, and disliked the dial interface in comparison
    • or, Keep the dial!  
      • Make the connection between functions and the dial more intuitive by adding visual cues such as lines, arrows, or images
  • 22. Recommendations
    • Connecting the form to the display
      • Give the users a more obvious indication of the changes they make, so they are given a better idea of what they are doing
    • Improve the prototype form
      • Create a more durable object
    • Throw out the dial!
      • A few users cited more familiarity with using buttons, and disliked the dial interface in comparison
    • or, Keep the dial!  
      • Make the connection between functions and the dial more intuitive by adding visual cues such as lines, arrows, or images
  • 23. Recommendations
    • Connecting the form to the display
      • Give the users a more obvious indication of the changes they make, so they are given a better idea of what they are doing
    • Improve the prototype form
      • Create a more durable object
    • Throw out the dial!
      • A few users cited more familiarity with using buttons, and disliked the dial interface in comparison
    • or, Keep the dial!  
      • Make the connection between functions and the dial more intuitive by adding visual cues such as lines, arrows, or images
  • 24. Acknowledgements
    • Don Norman ( http://www.jnd.org/GoodDesign.html )
    • Dr. Karon MacLean (for the suggestions)
    • Garth Shoemaker (for all the help)
    • Rock Leung (for standing in when Garth was away)