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  • 1. Good Evening ^^
  • 2. What Does Interest Rate Parity Mean?
    • Interest Rate Parity (IPR) theory is used to analyze the relationship between the spot rate and a corresponding forward (future) rate of currencies.
  • 3.
    • The IPR theory states interest rate differentials between two different currencies will be reflected in the premium or discount for the forward exchange rate on the foreign currency if there is no arbitrage - the activity of buying shares or currency in one financial market and selling it at a profit in another.
  • 4.
    • The relationship can be seen when you follow the two methods an investor may take to convert foreign currency into U.S. dollars.
  • 5.
    • The IPR theory states interest rate differentials between two different currencies will be reflected in the premium or discount for the forward exchange rate on the foreign currency if there is no arbitrage - the activity of buying shares or currency in one financial market and selling it at a profit in another.
  • 6.
    • The theory further states size of the forward premium or discount on a foreign currency should be equal to the interest rate differentials between the countries in comparison.
  • 7. There are two versions of interest rate parity:
  • 8.  
  • 9.  
  • 10. Arbitrage
    • it may refer to expected profit, though losses may occur, and in practice, there are always risks in arbitrage, some minor (such as fluctuation of prices decreasing profit margins), some major (such as devaluation of a currency or derivative).