Outreach

  • 21 views
Uploaded on

 

More in: Education
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
21
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • Definitions: Webster - For libraries, this means going above and beyond the call of duty to provide proactive library service; anticipating patron needs. Trotta – Not only does this mean providing equal services to patrons that cannot get to the library physically but also reaching out to those patrons that don’t even realize they need you and providing service to them; seeking them out.
    Types: Within the community we have faculty and students – They don’t all utilize the vast resources available at the library. Many feel the library is no longer necessary in the Internet age. This leaves the library in a position to prove that our services are not only necessary, but desirable. In addition, we need to reach out to new groups, like distance education students, and increase the usage by current patrons. Outside of the community are many groups that it would benefit the library to reach out to. Working with high school students has a positive effect on recruitment and provides those students a positive connection with the library before they ever attend classes. Working with local libraries and civic groups, like adult literacy, benefits the community with our contribution. It also benefits the library in that those groups will work with the library on interlibrary loan, joint projects, and other services that will benefit our own patrons.
  • The field of librarianship is one of service. We have to communicate that mission to our patrons; make them feel that the library is there to serve their needs, not to create an obstacle that they must overcome. However, that is how many students feel when their professors tell them they must use the authoritative resources that the library provides access to rather than the Internet. It is important for libraries to market their service nature in a way that makes their patrons feel that utilizing the library is a desirable thing.
  • This is the heart of being proactive. Many patrons don’t even know they need the library or a particular service. By providing fulfilling these unknown needs, the library can prove its worth in this “everything’s-on-the-Internet-and-I-can-find-it-myself-world.”
  • This is already being done here at UNC-P with the outreach to distance education students. However, it is the responsibility of all public service departments in a library to perform outreach for the services that their department provides and to work collaboratively with other library departments to deliver a unified outreach approach.
  • It is surprising how many of the library’s services are unknown to their patrons. I can’t count the number of times I’ve heard a student say “Wow I didn’t know we could do this,” when introduced to interlibrary loan. Then they go on to say, “this would have really been helpful with my term paper last semester.” What really shocks me is when I hear graduating seniors making the same or similar comments. I want to ask, “you mean in four years no one ever mentioned this to you?” They probably did have it mentioned to them, most likely their freshman year and maybe in their introductory English class. But were those services marketed in such a way that they couldn’t be missed? Outreach includes publicizing the services the library provides continuously and even aggressively.
    Not only does outreach include marketing current services, but also providing new services as needs arise. The changes in technology experienced in recent years has prompted many such needs. The rise in distance education, for example, has prompted the need to provide access services at a distance comparable to what on campus students receive. How do students in another city or state check out books or utilize interlibrary loan quickly and efficiently?
    But the focus cannot be solely on services. Services and patrons must go hand in hand. Outreach also includes making and maintaining connections with patrons. This is done partially through the provision of library services, but also by getting to know your patrons and what is important to them. This means talking to your patrons, being available to them and approachable, and participating in activities that are important to them.
    Connections with partners must me made and maintained as well. This facilitates the reciprocal agreements that will later benefit the library and it’s patrons. This includes actively participating in local civic groups, library consortia and staying aware of what is important to the community in order to maintain relevance.
  • Often access services provides coordination of the use of the community meeting places the library has to offer, from group study rooms to conference rooms. By recruiting groups to use these places, the traffic into the library is increased and the possibility exists for the increased use of other library resources.
    Online services are increasingly important in the Internet age and with the increase in distance education. Patrons want to be able to do electronically what they can do in person. For access services this includes renewing books, placing holds, and requesting and receiving interlibrary loan.
    Existing communication venues are excellent marketing tools. Posting flyers at the library or putting notices on the library’s website about new or improved services or reminders of previous services is good. But often those messages only reach the current patrons of the library. It is also important that the message reaches others. Student newspapers, bulletin boards in dining halls and dormitories, and campus listservs provide an excellent source for reaching those people in the community that have yet to utilize the library.
    Reciprocal agreements, as mentioned are integral to access services, especially where interlibrary loan is concerned.
    A well-advertised annual open house provides the opportunity to showcase changes at the library and especial accomplishments of the library. It also gets people into the library for something other than a necessity. It increases the feeling that the library is a desirable place to be.
    Often new campus faculty are show the library briefly, or it is only mentioned to them. It is important that these new faculty are not only given a tour of the library, but are introduced to the library staff so that they can associate a face with a service. They also need an introduction to the resources of the library. Like the students, they not may be familiar with the exact resources the library has to offer, as it may differ significantly from their previous institution. It is also important that follow-up is performed. As with students, it is not enough to simply show them at the beginning of their tenure what the library has to offer and then hope they will use it. It is important that they are repeatedly approached and offered assistance.
  • Understand how your program fits into the library’s operation and into the community, both on campus and off.
    Get informal and formal input from your patrons and partners and integrate it into your outreach program.
    Partner with other organizations, join professional associations where you can work with other librarians on similar projects and have your questions answered.
    Plan ahead and look for opportunities. Be flexible and anticipate change.
    Utilize specialized publications and attractive flyers. Distribute information where potential patrons meet, not just at the library or on the library’s website.

Transcript

  • 1. Outreach: A Key to Successful Access Services A Presentation by June L. Power, MLIS January 8, 2004
  • 2. What is outreach? ♦ Definition – “the extending of services or assistance beyond current or usual limits” • Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th ed. – “bringing services out to where they are needed” • “Why Outreach” – Marcia Trotta ♦ Types – Within the community – Outside of the community
  • 3. Why is outreach important? Outreach is important because it’s part of the mission of service that makes the reputation of libraries so unique.
  • 4. “It’s one thing to just sit in your information center and wait for people to come and ask questions. But it’s quite another to go out and offer information to those who have not asked for it.” –Kathy Miller from “At Arm’s Length” Go Out and Get Them
  • 5. What Outreach Means for Academic Libraries ♦ In addition to reaching out to populations not served or under-served by the library, outreach in academic libraries includes reaching out to those groups that the library serves, but that don’t take full advantage of the services the library has to offer.
  • 6. What Outreach Means for Access Services ♦ Marketing existing services ♦ Evolving with changing needs to expand services ♦ Making and maintaining connections with patrons and possible patrons ♦ Making and maintaining connections with partners Make them want to utilize the library!
  • 7. Examples of Outreach for Access Services ♦ Community meeting places ♦ Online Services ♦ Making use of existing communication venues ♦ Reciprocal Agreements ♦ Annual open house ♦ Library introductions for new staff
  • 8. Important Points to Remember About Outreach ♦ Keep the big picture in mind ♦ Listen to your patrons and potential patrons ♦ Get help ♦ Change and evolve as situations demand ♦ Market your services well – Adapted from Kathy Mayo’s “Keeping the Outreach Brand Viable”
  • 9. Bibliography ♦ Holtze, Terri L. “101 Ways to Reach Your Faculty.” OLOS Preconference at the American Library Association Annual Meeting. Atlanta, 13-14 June 2002. Accessed at http://www.ala.org/Content/NavigationMenu/Our_Association/Offices/Literacy_and_Ou treach_Services/OLOS_Programs_and_Activities/Preconferences/reach_faculty.pdf on Dec. 9, 2003. ♦ Mayo, Kathy. “12 Steps to Developing a Dynamic Outreach Program.” Great American Bookmobile and Outreach Services Conference IX. Estero, 3-5 October 2002. ♦ Miller, Kathy. “At Arm’s Length.” Accessed at http://www.ala.org/Content/NavigationMenu/Our_Association/Offices/Literacy_and_Ou treach_Services/Outreach_Resources/at_arms_length.pdf on Jan. 5, 2004. ♦ Office for Literacy and Outreach Services of the American Library Association. http://www.ala.org/Content/NavigationMenu/Our_Association/Offices/Literacy_and_Ou treach_Services/About_OLOS/About_OLOS1.htm Accessed Jan. 5, 2004. ♦ “Outreach Services – McHenry Library.” http://library.ucsc.edu/ref/outreach/ Accessed Dec. 9, 2003 ♦ Trotta, Marcia. “Why Outreach?” Managing Library Outreach Programs. New York: Neal-Schuman Publishers, Inc., 1993. ♦ Williams, Clara R. “Reference and instruction services go virtual as a form of outreach: case studies from academic libraries: the new virtual environment.” Information Outlook 7 Aug. 2003: 20-26.
  • 10. Bibliography ♦ Holtze, Terri L. “101 Ways to Reach Your Faculty.” OLOS Preconference at the American Library Association Annual Meeting. Atlanta, 13-14 June 2002. Accessed at http://www.ala.org/Content/NavigationMenu/Our_Association/Offices/Literacy_and_Ou treach_Services/OLOS_Programs_and_Activities/Preconferences/reach_faculty.pdf on Dec. 9, 2003. ♦ Mayo, Kathy. “12 Steps to Developing a Dynamic Outreach Program.” Great American Bookmobile and Outreach Services Conference IX. Estero, 3-5 October 2002. ♦ Miller, Kathy. “At Arm’s Length.” Accessed at http://www.ala.org/Content/NavigationMenu/Our_Association/Offices/Literacy_and_Ou treach_Services/Outreach_Resources/at_arms_length.pdf on Jan. 5, 2004. ♦ Office for Literacy and Outreach Services of the American Library Association. http://www.ala.org/Content/NavigationMenu/Our_Association/Offices/Literacy_and_Ou treach_Services/About_OLOS/About_OLOS1.htm Accessed Jan. 5, 2004. ♦ “Outreach Services – McHenry Library.” http://library.ucsc.edu/ref/outreach/ Accessed Dec. 9, 2003 ♦ Trotta, Marcia. “Why Outreach?” Managing Library Outreach Programs. New York: Neal-Schuman Publishers, Inc., 1993. ♦ Williams, Clara R. “Reference and instruction services go virtual as a form of outreach: case studies from academic libraries: the new virtual environment.” Information Outlook 7 Aug. 2003: 20-26.