Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Thingamabrarians
Thingamabrarians
Thingamabrarians
Thingamabrarians
Thingamabrarians
Thingamabrarians
Thingamabrarians
Thingamabrarians
Thingamabrarians
Thingamabrarians
Thingamabrarians
Thingamabrarians
Thingamabrarians
Thingamabrarians
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Thingamabrarians

823

Published on

My presentation for the 2007 MS Library 2.0 Summit.

My presentation for the 2007 MS Library 2.0 Summit.

Published in: Technology, Education
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
823
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
13
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Thingamabrarians: Social Librarianship & Library 2.0 Julie D. Shedd Mississippi State University/ University of Southern Mississippi June 15, 2007
  • 2. In this presentation: <ul><li>What is social librarianship? </li></ul><ul><li>What are social libraries? </li></ul><ul><li>Why is this so popular? </li></ul><ul><li>Why should our libraries care? </li></ul><ul><li>How can we get involved? </li></ul><ul><li>Which sites are the best? </li></ul>
  • 3. What is social librarianship? <ul><li>Professional librarians and non-professionals interacting through Web-based media cataloging technologies </li></ul><ul><li>These technologies are open to the public, user-centered, easily changed, constantly changing, and mostly free of charge </li></ul><ul><li>Cataloging of books and other media is done using library-approved methods (MARC records, LOC subject headings) and/or “folksonomies,” the taxonomies that result from user-defined classification (also known as “tagging”) </li></ul>
  • 4. What are social libraries? <ul><li>Websites that allow users to build catalogs of books and other media, and which have an element of 2.0-style social networking </li></ul>Delicious Library: Not so mucha social library (unless it’s exported!) LibraryThing: A social library
  • 5. Why is this so popular? <ul><li>People collect stuff </li></ul><ul><li>Book and other media cataloging = useful for insurance purposes </li></ul><ul><li>Many social libraries can be accessed by phone, helping you remember what you need and what you don’t </li></ul><ul><li>Social libraries help with completism (collecting all of something) </li></ul><ul><li>Social librarianship helps a population which has historically had trouble with social interaction </li></ul><ul><li>It provides a new, less judgmental arena for literary discussion </li></ul><ul><li>Tagging enables people to use terms that make sense to them to catalog their books </li></ul><ul><li>Social libraries indicate popularity of books and authors </li></ul><ul><li>Can help people decide what to read next </li></ul><ul><li>Provide a forum for safe interaction between authors and readers </li></ul>
  • 6. Why should our libraries care? <ul><li>What’s more Library 2.0 than social libraries? </li></ul><ul><li>Librarians’ public image could change—now thousands of people are amateur librarians </li></ul><ul><li>Social libraries are great forums for finding out what the library user really thinks about books and how libraries figure in her life </li></ul><ul><li>For small/rural libraries, this could be a godsend </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Some sites track loaned books – small libraries could run their OPAC on a social library site </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>For the rural towns of Mississippi, this could be a great way to interact with other rural libraries </li></ul></ul><ul><li>For bigger libraries, there are many applications… </li></ul>
  • 7. Social Libraries’ Applications in Traditional Libraries <ul><li>Collection development </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Automated book suggesters </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>User reviews, ratings, and recommendations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Popularity indicators </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Purchasing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Many sites have Amazon prices listed; some let you be notified once price drops </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Outreach </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Give users a friendly, informal way to see what your library is doing; organize events; solicit donations; provide a forum for discussion; talk with other libraries; let people see what your staff like to read </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Programming </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Social libraries can get users into reading groups and other library programs </li></ul></ul><ul><li>And many more…if you can imagine it, you can probably do it. </li></ul>
  • 8. A note on folksonomy vs. taxonomy (“real” classification) <ul><li>A big debate in the online library community – sometimes the only thing limiting a library’s participation in social libraries </li></ul><ul><li>While folksonomy lacks standardization and oversight, it is far more understandable to the user, and opens up many new classification options </li></ul>
  • 9. How can we get involved? <ul><li>Create user profiles for the library </li></ul><ul><li>Participate in book discussions, groups, and forums </li></ul><ul><li>Create groups specifically for your library (fantasy readers, teens, new parents, etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>Join “LibraryThing for Libraries,” which puts info from a powerful social library into your OPAC </li></ul><ul><li>Catalog your collections – let your library’s users interact with you and your collections </li></ul>
  • 10. Some libraries who are already involved… <ul><li>Danbury Public Library , Danbury, CT (the first to join LibraryThing for Libraries) </li></ul><ul><li>Shenandoah Public Library , Shenandoah, IA </li></ul><ul><li>The New York Public Library , New York, NY </li></ul><ul><li>Many other large and small public , church , hospital , and organizational libraries </li></ul><ul><li>Departments within larger libraries – for instance, the Children's & Parents' Services Department at the Mastics Moriches Shirley Community Library has cataloged over 200 books on LibraryThing ( http://www.librarything.com/groups/cpsdmmscl ) </li></ul><ul><li>Some people have begun their own lending libraries – for instance, the St. Catherine of Siena Catholic Lending Library ( http://www.librarything.com/groups/stcatherineofsienaca ) </li></ul>
  • 11. Top social libraries <ul><li>LibraryThing – http://www.librarything.com </li></ul><ul><li>GuruLib – http://www.gurulib.com </li></ul><ul><li>Bibliophil – http://www.bibliophil.org </li></ul><ul><li>Shelfari – http://www.shelfari.com </li></ul>
  • 12. Some up-and-comers… <ul><li>AllConsuming – http://www.allconsuming.net </li></ul><ul><li>aNobii - http://www.anobii.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>BookTribes – http://www.booktribes.com </li></ul><ul><li>Squirl - http://www.squirl.info/ </li></ul><ul><li>Zestr – http://www.zestr.com </li></ul>
  • 13. Bibliography <ul><li>Maness, J. (2006). &quot;Library 2.0 Theory: Web 2.0 and Its Implications for Libraries&quot;. Webology , 3 (2), Article 25. Available at: http://www.webology.ir/2006/v3n2/a25.html </li></ul><ul><li>Kroski, E. (2006). “Community 2.0.” Posted April 7, 2006. Available at: http://infotangle.blogsome.com/2006/04/07/community-20/ </li></ul><ul><li>Spalding, T. (2007). “Sneak peek: LibraryThing for Libraries.” Posted April 9, 2007. Available at: http://www.librarything.com/thingology/2007/04/sneak-peek-librarything-for-libraries_09.php </li></ul><ul><li>(2007). “A public library tries LibraryThing.” Library Journal. Available at: http://www.libraryjournal.com/article/CA6445695.html </li></ul><ul><li>“ James.” (2007). “Compare your library with LibraryThing.” Posted February 7, 2007. Available at: http://librarycogs.blogspot.com/2007/02/compare-your-library-with-librarything.html </li></ul><ul><li>“ Library2.0.” (2006). “Librarything [sic], Shelfari, and Gurulib: Social cataloging sites compared.” Posted October 21, 2006. Available at http://librarytwopointzero.blogspot.com/2006/10/librarything-shelfari-and-gurulib.html </li></ul><ul><li>“ Library2.0.” (2007). “Shelfari gets amazon [sic] investment.” Posted February 25, 2007. Available at http://librarytwopointzero.blogspot.com/2007/02/shelfari-gets-amazon-investment.html </li></ul><ul><li>Ishizuka, K. (2006). “Find more like this: A book lover’s MySpace.” School Library Journal 52(10): 24-25. Academic Search Premier database. </li></ul><ul><li>Rethlefsen, M. (2007). “Product pipeline.” Library Journal 132(Net Connect): 14-16. Academic Search Premier database. </li></ul><ul><li>Rethlefsen, M. (2007). “Chief Thingamabrarian.” Library Journal 132(1): 40-42. Academic Search Premier database. </li></ul><ul><li>MacIntyre, Jeff. (2007). “Song of my shelf.” Print 61(1): 100. Academic Search Premier database. </li></ul><ul><li>Bates, M. (2006). “Get your LibraryThing on.” Online 30(6): 64. </li></ul>
  • 14. DON’T ANGER THE YAK ASK ME QUESTIONS [email_address] On Facebook: Julie Dunn On LibraryThing: discordia

×