Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Lesson 4 shakespeares language
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Lesson 4 shakespeares language

26
views

Published on

Published in: Education

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
26
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. LO To know what makes Shakespeare’s language so difficult. To understand some Shakespearian phrases. To able to translate Shakespeare’s language into modern English. On your post-it note write the name of one Shakespeare play and it’s synopsis.
  • 2. The following words were first used in literature (not created) by William Shakespeare… ‘Assassination’ Macbeth “if the assassination Could trammel up the consequence, and catch With his surcease success”
  • 3. The following words were first used in literature (not created) by William Shakespeare… ‘bloody’ Richard III ‘O bloody Richard! —miserable England!’
  • 4. The following words were first used in literature (not created) by William Shakespeare… critical lapse accommodation aerial amazement apostrophe assassination baseless bump castigate changeful control countless courtship critic dexterously dishearten dislocate dwindle eventful exposure fitful frugal generous gloomy gnarled hurry impartial inauspicious indistinguishable invulnerable laughable lonely majestic misplaced monumental obscene multitudinous radiance reliance sanctimonious road sportive submerge suspicious
  • 5. When was the last time you said… "It’s Greek to me" Julius Caesar When you say, "it's Greek to me" you are admitting that you do not know or understand something.
  • 6. When was the last time you said… “green-eyed monster" Othello The Merchant of Venice When you say, “green-eyed monster" you are denoting jealousy.
  • 7. When was the last time you said… “In a pickle" Tempest Meaning: to be in a state of confusion
  • 8. Heart's content High time Hot-blooded I have not slept one wink Love is blind Out of the jaws of death Send him packing Star crossed lovers The Devil incarnate The game is up The Queen's English There's method in my madness This is the short and the long of it This is very midsummer madness Too much of a good thing Up in arms Vanish into thin air We few, we happy few, we band of brothers We have seen better days Wear your heart on your sleeve Wild goose chase Other examples…
  • 9. Your turn… Task 1 – look at the examples on the sheet you have been given. In your exercise books, can you translate these difficult phrases into modern English? Too easy? – Complete Task 2! Match the Shakespearian phrases to the modern ones.
  • 10. Change the following scene into modern English: First Witch: When shall we three meet again      In thunder, lightning, or in rain? Second Witch: When the hurlyburly's done When the battle's lost and won. Third Witch: That will be ere the set of sun. First Witch: Where the place? Second Witch: Upon the heath. Third Witch: There to meet with Macbeth. First Witch: I come, Graymalkin! Second Witch: Paddock calls. Third Witch Anon. ALL: Fair is foul, and foul is fair:      Hover through the fog and filthy air.

×