phd projects 2010 – 2011Faculty oF architecture and Fine art, ntnu
Phd catalogue 2010 / 2011Faculty oF architecture and Fine artFaculty of Architecture and Fine ArtNorwegian University of S...
contents4    ForeWord: architecture betWeen art and technology5    the Faculty oF architecture and Fine art6    ntnu — Fac...
phd projects 2010 – 2011architecture between art and technologythe Phd Program at the Faculty oF architecture and Fine art...
faculty of architecture and fine artthe Faculty oF architecture and Fine artThe Faculty Board. Top left to right: Fredrik ...
phd projects 2010 – 2011ntnu — Facts and Figures•	 Specialization in technology and the natural sciences.•	 Offers a range...
faculty of architecture and fine art                                  7
the projects
phd projects 2010 – 2011  cecilie anderssonFlux imPulses— Villages in the city and migrant residents in transForming urban...
faculty of architecture and fine artCollage showing the tricycle-paths in the financial district around the urban village ...
phd projects 2010 – 2011 Julien s. bourrellezero emission buildings: energy Flows,emissions and boundaries— the deVeloPmen...
faculty of architecture and fine artAn illustration on the multitude of paths energy follows across buildings. How can a r...
phd projects 2010 – 2011  Martin braathenFrom the reVolution oF the Present to the‘Presence oF the Past’— architecture and...
faculty of architecture and fine artSt. Olav Church, Trondheim, erected in 1973. Architect: Per Kartvedt.photo: Dag Nilsen...
phd projects 2010 – 2011 Mette byehistories oF architectural conserVationFiVe case studies on the treatment oF norwegian V...
faculty of architecture and fine artEtter snestorm (After the snowstorm), by Harald Sohlberg in 1903. These buildings in R...
phd projects 2010 – 2011  andreas eggertsentyPologies in enVironmentally adaPtedzero emission buildings— what are the char...
faculty of architecture and fine artBislingen Naturhotel - Concept for a Zero Emission Hotel in Nordmarka, by Snøhetta    ...
phd projects 2010 – 2011 Klaudia FarKasarchitectural integration oFPhotoVoltaics— Formal and symbolic aesthetics oF PVproj...
faculty of architecture and fine artinForMationcandidate:       Klaudia Farkasdepartment:      Architectural Design, Histo...
phd projects 2010 – 2011  Francesco goiaresPonsiVe building comPonents andrenewable energy sources exPloitation innet zero...
faculty of architecture and fine artThe activity dealing with integrated and active building skins requires research on di...
phd projects 2010 – 2011  steinar grynningmultiFunctional transParent Facadesolutionsproject descriptionThe total energy u...
faculty of architecture and fine artSolar energy can be harvested to lower the energy need and provide vital visible light...
phd projects 2010 – 2011 Ævar hardarsondaring details— a study oF design related building deFects in examPles oFmodern arc...
faculty of architecture and fine art                                                          outside                     ...
phd projects 2010 – 2011 eli hatlesKogarchitecture as a Framework For actionand change— community ParticiPation strategies...
faculty of architecture and fine art        Transport                         Café                                        ...
phd projects 2010 – 2011  hallgriM hJelMbreKKecorPorate strategy— consequences For choice oF concePt and goVernance in bui...
faculty of architecture and fine artThe choice of concept is one of the first and most important actions to align the owne...
phd projects 2010 – 2011 Karin høylandFrom knowledge about users to PremisesFor Planning«inclusiVe design» as a method For...
faculty of architecture and fine artphoto: Geir Mogen                    inForMation                    candidate:       K...
phd projects 2010 – 2011 thoMas haavizero emission building enVeloPes— ProPerties, details and solutionsproject descriptio...
faculty of architecture and fine artinForMationcandidate:       Thomas Haavidepartment:      Architectural Design, History...
phd projects 2010 – 2011 giedre Jarulaitieneintegrated conserVation in historicwooden towns oF the baltic sea region— the ...
faculty of architecture and fine artThe example of traditional materials used in conservation, Kokkola (Finland), 2008.pho...
phd projects 2010 – 2011 Kari hovin KJølleboundary objects as translationinstruments— a strategy For a decision-making Pro...
faculty of architecture and fine artActivities and artefacts defined as boundary objects used in a briefing process.photo:...
phd projects 2010 – 2011 nora Johanne Klungseththe municiPal cleaning serViceproject descriptionThe research project will ...
faculty of architecture and fine artphoto: Nora Johanne Klungseth                            inForMation                  ...
phd projects 2010 – 2011 tore KolåsPerFormance oF daylight redirectionsystems For high latitudesproject descriptionUtiliza...
faculty of architecture and fine artinForMationcandidate:       Tore Kolåsdepartment:      SINTEF ICTphone:           (+47...
phd projects 2010 – 2011 nicola lolliachieVe zero emission buildings:the case study oF myhrerenga— aPProach to green house...
faculty of architecture and fine artinForMationcandidate:       Nicola Lollidepartment:      Architectural Design, History...
phd projects 2010 – 2011  claudia Moscosothe imPact oF light and color at thePerceiVed quality oF sustainable architecture...
faculty of architecture and fine artLighting studies carried out by students in the ROMLAB, AB - Faculty, NTNUphoto: Barba...
phd projects 2010 – 2011  albogasto John ng’asiPost-conFlict reconstruction and recoVery:the case oF land and ProPerty dis...
faculty of architecture and fine artPost-conflict Commodification of land.photo: Albogasto John Ng’asi                    ...
phd projects 2010 – 2011 birgit risholtrenoVating existing buildings usingmultiFunctional systems For achieVingoPtimal the...
faculty of architecture and fine artRenovating existing buildings using multifunctional systems for achieving optimal ther...
phd projects 2010 – 2011    geir harald saMuelsenimages oF graVity— art and climbing as reVersible exPeriencesproject desc...
faculty of architecture and fine artCatching light, 2010. Videostill by Geir Harald Samuelsen.                            ...
phd projects 2010 – 2011 Pranita shresthaPolicy making From goVernment togoVernance— case oF making housing Policy For squ...
faculty of architecture and fine art‘Khadi Pakha’ is one of the 45 squatter settlements in the capital Kathmandu establish...
phd projects 2010 – 2011  sverre sondresena modern tectonic reading oF the buildingheritage— a method For Finding new arch...
faculty of architecture and fine art«Prøvrbustad i Hjartdal»illustration: Mir                           inForMation       ...
phd projects 2010 – 2011 britt sørliethe Village building— a new tyPology in architecture as a Possible sustainablePlannin...
faculty of architecture and fine artinForMationcandidate:       Britt Sørliedepartment:      Architectural Design, History...
PhD Catalogue AB Faculty 2011
PhD Catalogue AB Faculty 2011
PhD Catalogue AB Faculty 2011
PhD Catalogue AB Faculty 2011
PhD Catalogue AB Faculty 2011
PhD Catalogue AB Faculty 2011
PhD Catalogue AB Faculty 2011
PhD Catalogue AB Faculty 2011
PhD Catalogue AB Faculty 2011
PhD Catalogue AB Faculty 2011
PhD Catalogue AB Faculty 2011
PhD Catalogue AB Faculty 2011
PhD Catalogue AB Faculty 2011
PhD Catalogue AB Faculty 2011
PhD Catalogue AB Faculty 2011
PhD Catalogue AB Faculty 2011
PhD Catalogue AB Faculty 2011
PhD Catalogue AB Faculty 2011
PhD Catalogue AB Faculty 2011
PhD Catalogue AB Faculty 2011
PhD Catalogue AB Faculty 2011
PhD Catalogue AB Faculty 2011
PhD Catalogue AB Faculty 2011
PhD Catalogue AB Faculty 2011
PhD Catalogue AB Faculty 2011
PhD Catalogue AB Faculty 2011
PhD Catalogue AB Faculty 2011
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Catalogue of Doctoral Project at the Faculty of Architecture at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology

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PhD Catalogue AB Faculty 2011

  1. 1. phd projects 2010 – 2011Faculty oF architecture and Fine art, ntnu
  2. 2. Phd catalogue 2010 / 2011Faculty oF architecture and Fine artFaculty of Architecture and Fine ArtNorwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)Alfred Getz vei 37491 TrondheimNorwayTel. +47 73550275Fax. +47 73595094E-mail: fak-adm@ab.ntnu.noWeb: www.ntnu.no/abFront page: Maskros/Dandelion, 10 meters high permanent sculpture in steel & bronze,Trondheim, Norway, 2007. By artists Are Blytt, Niklas Mulari and Mikael Nilsson.Photo by Ruth Woods.Layout by Lars Schanche Bølviken.Editors: Sarah Speer By, Eli Støa and Kenneth Stoltz.Print: NTNU-trykk 7491 Trondheim NorwayFaculty of Architecture and Fine Art, 2011ISBN 978-82-7551-063-9
  3. 3. contents4 ForeWord: architecture betWeen art and technology5 the Faculty oF architecture and Fine art6 ntnu — Facts and Figures10 cecilie andersson Flux impulses12 Julien s. bourrelle Zero emission buildings: energy flows, emissions and boundaries14 Martin braathen From the revolution of the present to the ‘presence of the past’16 Mette bye Histories of architectural conservation18 andreas eggertsen Typologies in environmentally adapted zero emission buildings20 Klaudia FarKas Architectural integration of photovoltaics22 Francesco goia Responsive building components and renewable energy sources exploitation in net zero energy/emission buildings24 steinar grynning Multifunctional transparent facade solutions26 Ævar hardarson Daring details28 eli hatlesKog Architecture as a framework for action and change30 hallgriM hJelMbreKKe Corporate strategy32 Karin høyland From knowledge about users to premises for planning34 thoMas haavi Zero emission building envelopes36 giedre Jarulaitiene Integrated conservation in historic wooden towns of the Baltic sea region38 Kari hovin KJølle Boundary objects as translation instruments40 nora Johanne Klungseth The municipal cleaning service42 tore Kolås Performance of daylight redirection systems for high latitudes44 nicola lolli Achieve zero emission buildings: the case study of Myhrerenga46 claudia Moscoso The impact of light and color at the perceived quality of sustainable architecture48 albogasto John ng’asi The case of land and property disputes and claims in northern Uganda50 birgit risholt Renovating existing buildings using multifunctional systems for achieving optimal thermal performance ...52 geir harald saMuelsen Images of gravity54 Pranita shrestha Policy making from government to governance56 sverre sondresen A modern tectonic reading of the building heritage58 britt sørlie The village building60 ayon KuMar taraFdar Bridging the dichotomy62 tseWang tashi Modern art in the Tibet autonomous region since the 1940’s64 Maria teder Transitional use66 torbJørn tryti Investigation of the pedagogic potential in tectonic studies [in wood]68 noMeda urboniene The performative participatory artistic practice in forming the notion of public space in a post-communist era70 Wang yi Quality of physical environment, quality of life72 Wang yu Cultural heritage in post-disaster planning74 ruth Woods Shopping with art76 solvår Wågø Between a rock and a hard place?78 dongMing Xu Cultural translation: the role of museums in identity formation80 cecilie Flyen øyen Process related moisture problems in buildings
  4. 4. phd projects 2010 – 2011architecture between art and technologythe Phd Program at the Faculty oF architecture and Fine art, ntnuThe doctoral studies represent an important part of the by climatic changes. In 2009, the Research Council of Norwayresearch within a university, and in this publication we provide assigned The Faculty of Architecture and Fine Art to hosta brief presentation of current PhD projects at the Faculty of the Research Centre on Zero Emission Buildings (ZEB). OverArchitecture and Fine Art. Our three-year PhD program in the last year we have been recruiting 10 PhD and post doc.architecture addresses topics in architecture, planning, art candidates to work with ZEB at NTNU. And there will be moreand technology related to important research questions in our candidates over the next eight years. They will join ZEB in orderknowledge field. to develop fundamental knowledge, products and solutions for zero emission buildings related to their production, operationThe Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) and demolition.encourages research and artistic development work in orderto fulfil the strategic goals for being an international highly Architecture, as a profession and a scientific discipline, needsrecognized university. Research and artistic development work to develop a stronger knowledge base to be competitive as anis also a priority area for the Faculty of Architecture and Fine industry and recognised as an academic discipline.Art. We see the PhD education and our PhD candidates as our And we need to tear down the walls and barriers betweenmost important activity and asset in research, and we are proud academic research and the professional practical development.to present our active candidates and the subjects for their We see the doctoral studies and our PhD candidates as veryresearch. important for establishing a stronger knowledge base for both our education and the professional practise.The candidates are working in a broad range of subjects relatedto architecture and fine art. Architecture is a profession anda scientific discipline. Architecture can also classify a form ofart and an art work. The knowledge platform for our disciplinebuilds on traditions and elements from humanities, socialsciences and technology / engineering. A specific characteris that architecture as one of “the making disciplines” alsobuilds on skills and craftsmanship learned in practice. ThePhD studies and research work in our faculty also reflects thebroad knowledge platform for our discipline. Our candidates areworking with development work and reflections in fine art, inplanning and development studies, in architectural theory andhistory and in architectural design using a “research by design”approach.A more sustainable development in architecture, planning Tore I. Haugenand construction is of vital importance for solving the global Deanchallenges for our society. And the majority of our doctoral Faculty of Architecture and Fine Art,candidates work with subjects related to challenges caused Norwegian University of Science and Technology4
  5. 5. faculty of architecture and fine artthe Faculty oF architecture and Fine artThe Faculty Board. Top left to right: Fredrik Shetelig, Odd Joar Oksås, Jon Arne Mogstad, Hans Skotte, Kristin Jarmund, Per Ivar Maudal, Tore I. Haugen.Front row, left to right: Anne Gjesdal Bjørndal, Anne Grete Hestnes (leader ZEB), Eivind Kasa, Mari Oline Giske Stendebakken, Anne Beim, Christel Sverre.photo: Kenneth Stoltz / NTNUThe Faculty of Architecture and Fine Art is one of seven facul- • Master of Science in Physical Planningties at NTNU, and Norway’s oldest and largest institution for • Master of Science in Urban Ecological planningeducation of new architects, dating back to the inauguration of • Master of Science in Sustainable Architecturethe Norwegian Institute of Technology in 1910. A large part ofthe country’s architects are educated here. The faculty has more than 500 students in the various architec- tural studies, and about 100 students in the visual arts. NearlyThe Art Academy in Trondheim (KiT) was founded as an art 40 people are occupied with doctorate/post-doctorate projects.school just after World War II, and became a public art academy There are 110 employees at the faculty, of which approximatelyin 1987. In 1996, KiT merged into the new NTNU, as one of five 55 permanent scientific staff.departments at the Faculty of Architecture and Fine Art. The Faculty has experienced a significant economic growthWe offer the following programs: the recent years. This applies especially to the externally• Master of Science in Architecture funded research activities, such as the Research Centre for• Bachelor Program in Visual Arts Zero Emission Buildings (ZEB), which has a 300 million budget• Master of Visual Arts (close to 40 million Euros) for the years 2009-2017. The facul-• Master of Science in Property Development and Management ty’s annual budget is currently about 15 million euros.• Experience-based Master of Real Estate and Facility Management 5
  6. 6. phd projects 2010 – 2011ntnu — Facts and Figures• Specialization in technology and the natural sciences.• Offers a range of bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral programs in the humanities, social sciences, economics and public and business adminis- tration, and aesthetic disciplines.• Professional degree programs in medicine, psychology, architecture, the fine arts, music, and teacher education, in addition to technology.• 7 faculties and 53 departments.• 20.000 students, half of whom are studying technology-related subjects or the natural sciences.• 48 per cent of NTNU students are female.• About 3.100 degrees awarded each year, of which 800 are bachelor’s degrees, 2.000 are master’s degrees and 300 are doctoral degrees.• About 850 international students.• Dozens of international student exchange programs and more than 300 cooperative or exchange agreements with 58 universities around the world.• 4.700 man-years, more than half of which are in academic or scientific positions.• About 2.000 R&D projects at any time.• More than 100 laboratories.• Participant in 60 projects in the European Commission’s 6th and 7th framework programs.• Close cooperation with SINTEF, an R&D organization with 1.800 employees (both co-located with NTNU in Trondheim, and in Oslo).• Sponsorship and cooperation agreements with Norwegian and interna- tional business and industry.• Annual budget NOK 4.7 billion (approx. 600 million Euros)• We own or rent premises with a total area of 575 000 sqm.• NTNU Library has 2.8 million printed volumes, 46.300 electronic books and 11.800 electronic journals photo: Mentz Indergaard / NTNU Info6
  7. 7. faculty of architecture and fine art 7
  8. 8. the projects
  9. 9. phd projects 2010 – 2011 cecilie anderssonFlux imPulses— Villages in the city and migrant residents in transForming urbanrealms, guangzhou, china.project descriptionI explore how the presence and the influence of rural-urban I want to know what subjective positions migrants use asmigrants transform the social and physical organization of responses to contradictions in expectations and experiencesthe urban village and the surrounding city, in the case of the of being in the city, on the margin. What shapes are generatedvillage-in-the-city-phenomenon (VIC) in the Pearl River Delta through the organization of negotiable borders, appropriation(PRD), China. of space through modifications, or time and space sharing of interest?In many urban villages the majority of the population istemporary migrant residents staying for only three months on As an approach to my research I have initiated severalaverage. In their nomadic relation to the city the ‘floating popu- small-scale, low-cost actions in urban villages, and thereoflation’ attaches to the densest urban structures in the Chinese “harvested” narratives, through open-ended processes ofurban realm; a site of displacement; the VIC. co-research with migrant participants exemplified by: Renting and upgrading a dwelling-house for jobless migrants whoThe general urban development with growing sprawl caused share their diaries as their tenant contribution, initiating a long-the urban village to reorient. However, today, the migrants term photo-documentation project, for migrant participants,are seen as the interruption of the traditional village life with producing “vandal-sandals” in urban villages listed for demoli-their massive migration and temporary character. Likewise, tion, to collect cultural impressions of vanishing resources,the migrant population is seen to interrupt the wanted ‘harmo- arranging workshops for architect-students constructingnious urban development’ and the modernization–image of the physical and organisational implementations in urban villages.surrounding city by operating in it, as if it was a village.I examine the transforming mechanisms in three of the 138urban villages located in the city of Guangzhou. In the midstof these urban dynamic processes and conflicting discourses10
  10. 10. faculty of architecture and fine artCollage showing the tricycle-paths in the financial district around the urban village of Xian Cun, Guangzhou.illustration: Cecilie Andersson inForMation candidate: Cecilie Andersson department: Urban Design and Planning phone: (+47) 73 59 50 20 e-mail: cecilie.andersson@ntnu.no education: M.Arch Bergen School of Architecture project start: February 2007 supervisors: Hans Christie Bjønness (NTNU), Lisbet Sauarlia (NTNU) 11
  11. 11. phd projects 2010 – 2011 Julien s. bourrellezero emission buildings: energy Flows,emissions and boundaries— the deVeloPment oF a robust energy and emission calculation toolto eValuate Future zero emission buildings in norway.project descriptionThe global community aims to reduce net greenhouse gas Different national ZEB calculation methodologies are surveyedemissions, notably by a reduction in energy consumption in in collaboration with the international community through thebuildings. The development of Zero Emission Buildings (ZEBs) IEA SHC Task 40 / ECBCS Annex 52. Relevant calculationis a promising solution to the problem of greenhouse gas emis- methodologies proposed by a selection of countries are inves-sions. However, this type of building currently lacks a common tigated further. The different approaches and parameters useddefinition, or even a common understanding. in these methodologies are to be adapted to the Norwegian realities and the scope of Norwegian ZEBs. Furthermore,Under the umbrella of The Research Centre on Zero Emission the concepts surrounding energy flows in technologicallyBuildings, this project aims to set up the basis for defining an advanced dwellings and traditional buildings are investigatedenergy and emission calculation methodology for zero emis- in relation with the proposed methodologies.sion buildings in Norway. The different flows of energy andthe possible boundaries associated with energy calculation A robust energy and emission calculation methodology willare being investigated with a focus on compliance rather than insure that incentives provided to the industry by policymakersdesign. Also, the analysis tackles the environmental, economic will result in the development of buildings which truly willand social implications of the different variables to be included contribute to the long term reduction of greenhouse gas emis-into such calculations. sions urged by the scientific community.12
  12. 12. faculty of architecture and fine artAn illustration on the multitude of paths energy follows across buildings. How can a robust accounting method be developed?illustration: Julien S. Bourrelle, Kevin Sanouiller and Fanny Jacquet inForMation candidate: Julien S. Bourrelle department: Architectural Design, History and Technology phone: (+47) 73 59 33 46 e-mail: julien.bourrelle@ntnu.no education: M.Sc. Astronautics, Technische Universität München; M.Sc. Astronautics, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid project start: August 2009 supervisors: Arild Gustavsen (NTNU), Inger Andresen (NTNU), Øyvind Aschehoug (NTNU), Tor Helge Dokka (NTNU) 13
  13. 13. phd projects 2010 – 2011 Martin braathenFrom the reVolution oF the Present to the‘Presence oF the Past’— architecture and autonomy in norway 1970-1980project descriptionThe historical research project From the Revolution of the The main focus is on the one hand, the change in the critiquePresent to ‘The Presence of the Past’: Architecture and of architectural modernism - from the early 1970s’ criticismAutonomy in Norway 1970-1980 will study how postmod- of the authoritarian architect and the turn towards participa-ernist ideas appeared in the architectural discourse in Norway tion and «architecture without architects,» to the critique ofbetween 1970-1980; both how international ideas were inter- modernism as abstract and “meaningless” of the 1980’s. Onpreted in the Norwegian context and what ideas that repre- the other hand, it will focus on the shift in the architecture insti-sented a distinctive ‘Norwegian postmodernism’. More than tution’s view of its societal autonomy — from a degradation ofthe introduction of some new paradigm, it is the transforma- the institution’s autonomy in relation to other fields such astion between two seemingly very different political and ideo- politics or the media in the 60’s, through a depreciation of thelogical positions that is happening in this decade that will be institution in its entirety in the radical political circles in thethe main interest of study. In particular, it’s the transition from 70’s, to the insistence on a fully autonomous discipline with itsthe iconoclastic, politically oriented architecture culture of own self-sufficient formal language as it appears at Presence of1960’s, to the language-, symbol-, and history-focused critique the Past — the Venice Architecture Biennale in 1980.of modernism in the post-modern architecture institution.14
  14. 14. faculty of architecture and fine artSt. Olav Church, Trondheim, erected in 1973. Architect: Per Kartvedt.photo: Dag Nilsen inForMation candidate: Martin Braathen department: Architectural Design, History and Technology phone: (+47) 90 57 61 12 e-mail: martin.braathen@ntnu.no education: M.Arch, NTNU project start: September 2009 supervisor: Dag Nilsen (NTNU) 15
  15. 15. phd projects 2010 – 2011 Mette byehistories oF architectural conserVationFiVe case studies on the treatment oF norwegian Vernacular heritagebuildings , circa 1920-1980project descriptionThe aim of this study has been to explore why and how cultural significant general themes in building conservation throughoutbuilt heritage has been altered and modified when the implied this period. The case studies may also be read separately, asoverall motive is to preserve. The study addresses the relation- self-contained narratives; examples of conservation practice atship between ideals of building conservation, and its practice a specific time and place; or as illustrations of the culture, orin the form of restoration, regeneration or maintenance on cult, of architectural conservation at the point of intersectionwooden, vernacular homes in Norway. Within this typological between professional idealism and the realities of everyday life.frame, the study seeks to explore prevailing ideologies andstrategies in building conservation, and whether and how All the buildings examined in the case studies were shown tothese change over time. Considering the contribution of this have been altered since their designation as cultural heritage,research, three themes may be put forward: the objects of some significantly. The case studies demonstrate treatmentthe study which is vernacular buildings as opposed to archi- ranging from the extremes of demolition and replacementtectural monuments, the focus on the specific treatment of a with new structures to well organized, regular and exemplaryspecific building as opposed to a more general and theoretical maintenance, with intermediate types of treatment includingapproach, and giving voice to the antiquarian in conservation relocation, adaptive architecture, modernization and restora-practice as a means of explaining the alleged undercommuni- tion and regeneration and repair . None of the buildings in thecated intentions of the professional conservation community. case studies exemplify treatment which was entirely according to the ideal conservation practice in the strictest sense. TheThe empirical basis of the research is five case studies in five findings demonstrate that for the majority of the cases, thedifferent locations, which comprise a total of 19 individual ideal solutions proposed by the professional conservationbuildings. Melhus vicarage, consists of one single listed community, however pragmatic, were subject to negotiationbuilding in Melhus, Sør-Trøndelag county; three buildings and compromise. In some cases the consequences werewhich are each set in a different rural farmyard context in severe; if not for the area character, then for the original designGudbrandsdalen in the county of Oppland; Sohlbergrekka in and fabric of the individual buildings.Røros, a row of listed buildings in an urban setting, also in thecounty of Sør-Trøndelag; Rosesmuggrenden, a conservation All buildings in the case studies represent conservationarea in Bergen in Hordaland county; and Sjøgata in Mosjøen a through use. Continued active use of vernacular architecturalconservation area in Vefsn, Nordland county. heritage was endorsed by the conservation community from the beginning, and solutions for housing standard improve-The case studies cover architectural conservation practice ments were frequently part of the antiquarians’ prescribedin Norway in the time frame from 1920 to the early 1980s. treatment. Despite this, the end products of treatment reflectThe intention has been that each case should touch upon conservation ideals to a very variable extent.16
  16. 16. faculty of architecture and fine artEtter snestorm (After the snowstorm), by Harald Sohlberg in 1903. These buildings in Røros were often referred to as Sohlbergrekka,the Sohlberg row, after his painting. Five of the buildings were listed in 1923. Harald Sohlberg (1869-1935) lived in Røros from1902-1907. (Copyright Nasjonalgalleriet) inForMation candidate: Mette Bye department: Architectural Design, History and Technology phone: (+47) 41 66 00 04 e-mail: mette.bye@hist.no education: Cand. Philol. University of Bergen project start: The doctoral thesis was defended successfully in November 2010 supervisor: Professor Eir Grytli (NTNU) 17
  17. 17. phd projects 2010 – 2011 andreas eggertsentyPologies in enVironmentally adaPtedzero emission buildings— what are the characteristics oF enVironmentally adaPted zeroemission building concePts and strategies?project descriptionZero Emission Buildings are designed with the objective to Cultural-, Social- and Economical Environments of the specificconstruct buildings with no negative impact on the greenhouse context is sought to be understood by mapping architectural andgas balance of the atmosphere. The ambition demands a energy concepts in search of meaningful interdependencies. Thesystemic approach with energy and the environment in focus, ambition of the project is to identify patterns of characteristics ofbut still with human health and enjoyment as point of origin for ZEB and the connectivity of the building with the context, to easethe design process. For environmentally adapted Zero Emission communication and facilitate better visualization and compre-Buildings to form sustainable settlements attractive for the user hension of Environmentally Adapted Zero Emission Building.the design must strive to create social arenas for meetings indelightful environments, where activities take place with a good topological optimizationquality of life, accessible for all. Comfortable in door climate with The identified concepts will be evaluated and structured intominimal use of health- and environmentally harmful materials a taxonomy of typologies illustrating a range of solutions forcreate safe and sound spaces for work, play and recreation. ZEB concepts suitable for specific climatic and environmentalRobust solutions and materials with low life cycle costs, long conditions used for scenario based design methodologies oflifespan and details designed for ease of separation, recycling topology optimization in architectural design. The methodologyor reuse ensure low ecological footprint. Outdoor spaces and is intended to strengthen communication and ease the dialogueplanting designed with varied character enhances the natural on environmentally adapted ZEB by further development of para-qualities of the site and improves biodiversity and strengthen the metric methods and real world data modelling to investigate howrelation between the user and the site. Climate protected spaces boundary conditions of Environmentally Adapted Zero Emissionand pedestrian comfort enables public forums and social activity. Buildings drive formfinding of sustainable settlements.Well functioning infrastructure, easy access to public transportwith safe and enjoyable walking and bicycle conditions minimizes implementationenergy consumption and make way for sustainable urban habits. The implementation of the identified methods, concepts and strategies is sought to be tested and understood through casedeveloping a vocabulary studies and by following the design process of pilot projects forThe qualities stated above are but some of the qualities that char- the ZEB centre. The taxonomy of ZEB concepts is applied withacterize sustainable architecture. For human settlements with the focus on communication through the means of Digital Designaspiration to unfold in the spirit of natural processes the buildings tools, Evolutionary Algorithms and Design to Production technol-can not be separated from the context and the surrounding envi- ogies to investigate the translation of architectural concepts intoronment of which they are a part. This research will investigate the built form in search of an understanding of the complex relation-structure of relationships within the larger system of which the ships between user, building and environment on development ofbuilding is a part. How the ZEB building connects to the Natural-, sustainable growth and placemaking.18
  18. 18. faculty of architecture and fine artBislingen Naturhotel - Concept for a Zero Emission Hotel in Nordmarka, by Snøhetta inForMation candidate: Andreas Eggertsen department: Architectural Design, History and Technology e-mail: andreas.eggertsen@ntnu.no education: M.Sc. Architecture, Aalborg University project start: October 2010 supervisors: Annemie Wyckmans (NTNU), Inger Andresen (NTNU) 19
  19. 19. phd projects 2010 – 2011 Klaudia FarKasarchitectural integration oFPhotoVoltaics— Formal and symbolic aesthetics oF PVproject descriptionThe principal task of the building skin is to create a comfort- of these components play an important role as well. There isable shelter and protection from elements. However it has also a need to find the architectural language of PV products tobeen a platform of art and expression of symbolic meanings. enhance future developments and change the perception fromRecently a contemporary and innovative possibility and func- a technical device to a building component.tion of the building envelope came into focus: the building skinas a responsive component of a low energy concept. Several The PhD project investigates the formal and symbolicbuilding surfaces are suitable for solar products, especially for aesthetics of photovoltaics and the perception of BIPV projectsphotovoltaics that generate electricity. among architects. The projects used for investigation are public building facades with custom-made PV products, where theLately a variety of products have been developed to match experimentation to find the architectural language and integra-building integration and architects’ needs. The basic aim is tion in the overall design is stronger. Moreover public buildingsto produce clean electricity. However, while the solar module have a more important representational and educational rolebecomes part of the building skin, it might have multiple struc- through their facades that are exposed to the public.tural functions and could require aesthetical integration intothe overall design concept. The aim is to develop criteria for architectural integration and guidelines for architects for widespread use of this technology.There are several barriers that prevent architects from using Moreover the results of the thesis will provide guidelines forthe potentials of this technology. Economy and lack of knowl- producers to develop products that meet architects needs foredge are crucial issues, while the perception and prejudices architectural integration.20
  20. 20. faculty of architecture and fine artinForMationcandidate: Klaudia Farkasdepartment: Architectural Design, History and Technologyphone: (+47) 47 44 55 30e-mail: klaudia.farkas@ntnu.noeducation: M.Arch and Eng, Budapesti Tanítóképzö Föiskolaproject start: October 2007supervisors: Anne Grete Hestnes (NTNU), Inger Andresen (NTNU) 21
  21. 21. phd projects 2010 – 2011 Francesco goiaresPonsiVe building comPonents andrenewable energy sources exPloitation innet zero energy/emission buildingsproject descriptionDuring the last years, the research activity in the field of building to limit as much as possible the use of fossil fuels for indoorcomponents and building services has led to the identification environment control. Such minimization can come from theand development of numerous solutions able to considerably redistribution of the energy fluxes where and when they arereduce the energy consumption in buildings. needed in the building: energy gains produced by solar systems or waste energy can freely be redistributed from one part of theHowever, as the energy efficiency of the whole building building to another (e.g. from the east to the west side, or fromincreases, the possibility to further upgrade its energy different zones of the building with different uses, e.g. from theperformance becomes more and more limited. Therefore, office or shopping area to the residential area) or stored fornew concepts and solutions that are able to operate with the further uses.marginal opportunities offered by energy sources with lowexergy levels and to better exploit solar energy are necessary. Because of the very complex task, such technological advance-“Active” and “adaptive” building components (the so-called ments will require an integrated approach which involves“Responsive Building Elements” RBEs, as defined by IEA-ECBCS research on different levels (e.g. concept level, system level,Annex 44) integrated with innovative building service tech- component level…) and on the entire building componentsnologies and with systems for solar energy exploitation may catalogue (building envelope technologies, building services,represent a promising solution to this issue. renewable technologies, energy storage…).The research activity deals with the identification, develop- Within the research activity, a particular focus is placed onment, and assessment of possible configurations of dynamic the development and assessment (by numerical modelling/building skins, combined with small size traditional HVAC simulations and by experimental activities) of active andsystems, with solar systems (thermal and PV systems), and responsive building skins. In fact, because of the key role thatwith energy storage technologies, in order to develop inte- the building enclosure system plays in controlling the energygrated, “organic” solutions for Zero Emission/Energy Buildings and mass flows leaving and entering the indoor environment,(ZEBs). These systems should be able to proactively manage the dynamic and active building envelope is a very promisingthe energy gains, to exploit different (and low exergy level) concept. It is expected to provide a substantial contribution,renewable energy sources, to store thermal energy, and to together with the other integrated systems, to reach the ZEBredistribute it within the building itself. The aim of these target.systems is to provide a high-quality indoor environment and22
  22. 22. faculty of architecture and fine artThe activity dealing with integrated and active building skins requires research on different levels, from the concept level (a) tothe material level (c), passing through the technology/component level (b). All the levels require features that enable a dynamicand responsive behaviour of the system.illustrations: (a) A. van der Aa, Designing with Responsive Building Elements; (b) the Polyvalent Wall by Mike Davies; (c) ATPmembrane transport. inForMation candidate: Francesco Goia department: Architectural Design, History and Technology (NTNU), Energetics (Politecnico di Torino) e-mail: francesco.goia@ntnu.no, francesco.goia@polito.it education: M.Sc. Architecture, Politecnico di Torino, M.Sc. Architecture, Politecnico di Milano, PG. Master in Materials for Energy and Environment, Università del Piemonte Orientale project start: January 2010 supervisors: Matthias Haase (NTNU), Marco Perino (Politecnico di Torino) 23
  23. 23. phd projects 2010 – 2011 steinar grynningmultiFunctional transParent Facadesolutionsproject descriptionThe total energy use related to the building industry constitutes energy into buildings.approximately 40% of the worlds gathered energy use. It istherefore vital to reduce the energy consumption in this sector. Based on this, heat, moisture, and lighting technical challengesNew building regulations constantly sharpen the demands relevant to the design of the building envelope, will make upfor energy consumptions in buildings. A large part of the heat the main parts of this thesis, as well as studies of the CO2loss in buildings occurs through the glazed parts of the enve- emissions related to the various systems. The main focus willlope. Based on these facts one should further investigate the be directed towards the transparent parts of the envelope.possibilities of reducing this heat loss. In addition, large glazed Systems for shading and control of the incident solar radiationareas in a facade will, in general, give raise to a cooling need and the total heat transportation through the facades will bein the building. If one can find systems to control the incident studied using theoretical and experimental methods.solar radiation in a desired way it will reduce energy demandsrelated to cooling, thus giving an even greater energy savings objectivepotential. • The starting goal of this thesis is to establish competence within the field of transparent facade technologies, i.e.The effect of shading systems and dynamic control of these state-of-the-art on transparent facades.systems on the cooling and heating demand in buildings has • Establishing of central performance parameters for theo-previously been studied in several publications (Laouadi, 2010, retical and experimental assessment of building envelopeRosenkrantz, 2003; Brunoro, 2007, Poirazis 2005). However energy and daylighting performance.none of these have studied the effect of such shading devices • The main part of the thesis will be based around quantita-in combination with high performance glazing (i.e. glazings tive work, i.e numerical and analytical assessment as wellwith U-values below 0.6-0.7 W/m2K) on buildings located in as laboratory and field studies of energy use for buildinga Nordic climate. components as well as entire buildings. • Development and construction of full-scale test cell forAnother important, and previously neglected, research topic is measurement of full-size facade elements and components.life cycle analysis and CO2-emission calculations for the facade • The main objective of the work is to create a broadenedsolutions. Evaluation of different construction principles and knowledge base on which to establish correlations betweensolutions will be performed due to today’s heightened focus the different envelope parts and their effect on the neton energy use and CO2 emissions. And windows and glazed energy use and CO2 emissions of future (Zero Emission)facades are in this regard particularly interesting assemblies buildings.since they, in addition to losing energy, also admit renewable24
  24. 24. faculty of architecture and fine artSolar energy can be harvested to lower the energy need and provide vital visible light in a building.illustration: Byggforskserien nr. 571.954, SINTEF inForMation candidate: Steinar Grynning department: Architectural Design, History and Technology phone: (+47) 73 59 33 75 e-mail: steinar.grynning@ntnu.no education: M.Sc. NTNU project start: September 2010 supervisors: Arild Gustavsen (NTNU), Berit Time (SINTEF), Matthias Haase (NTNU) 25
  25. 25. phd projects 2010 – 2011 Ævar hardarsondaring details— a study oF design related building deFects in examPles oFmodern architectureproject descriptionThe goal of the research project has been to examine design- projects spanning 60 years have been analysed. A databank ofrelated building defects, in particular through examples of cases has been created which contains over 50 creative inter-innovative architecture from the 20th century, where defects national architectural works, all of which have had buildinghave been a common problem. The research findings will be defects.of use to architectural students, practising architects and otherbuilding project leaders. The Research revealed that there are similar building defects in the U.S., Norway and Iceland. Common patterns are flaws inThe theoretical framework for the project is well known archi- the design of details. In most cases there are defects in mois-tectural theories. The research focus is on the relationship ture protection. It appears that the designers put their focus onbetween normative theories on form and aesthetics, design aesthetics and ignored common knowledge of sound buildingof the building envelope and theories on building defects. practices. The driving force appears to be in the daring designParticular focus has been on whether the cause of building details, presented as aesthetic ideals and doctrines by creativedefects is due to flaws in planning, defects in design or architects.mistakes in the construction phase. Environmental and localclimate forces have also been studied. The conclusions of the research project will have special significance in the education of architects and other designers,The research method has been qualitative case studies where who work with form and detail design in architecture.the design and building history of four innovative building26
  26. 26. faculty of architecture and fine art outside insideDetail of Fallingwater USA 1937illustration: Ævar Hardarson and Albina Thordarson inForMation candidate: Ævar Hardarson department: Architectural Design and Management phone: (+354) 445 8005, (+354) 895 8161 e-mail: avar.hardarson@gmail.com, avarh@ark.ntnu.no education: M.Arch, Oslo School of Architecture and Design project start: January 2003 supervisors: Tore Haugen (NTNU), Ragnar Sigbjørnsson (University of Iceland) Jan Vincent Thue (NTNU),Helge Solberg (NTNU) 27
  27. 27. phd projects 2010 – 2011 eli hatlesKogarchitecture as a Framework For actionand change— community ParticiPation strategies For brøset, trondheimproject descriptionIn order to shape a more sustainable world there are many learn about sustainable living and initiate change at a localgovernmental targets which may be set. Whilst these targets level.can help to define an overall vision for a city or nation, theydo not necessarily filter down successfully to a local level. For The observations, reflections and actions of a speciallysustainability to be comprehensive, this research suggests that, designed unit of architecture students have enabled theaction and architecture can be used to educate, empower and Research by Design phase of this Action Research. The evalua-engage a community and assist them in making and managing tion and modification of these early stages hopes to lead to thetheir own small steps towards sustainable living. design of a framework for community actions at Brøset.The planned future suburb of Brøset in Trondheim, Norway, has The design of this structure aims to reflect local skills, mate-a strong vision. It aims to make environmentally friendly living rials and interests. In order for the community to take owner-easy and cut the CO2 emissions of its residents to 3 tons per ship of the site, they will be encouraged to both participate inyear. As a pilot project of the Framtidens Byer (Future Cities) and drive the design, construction, activity programming andinitiative, it hopes to become a model for multidisciplinary management stages.planning processes in Norway. The research supposes that through the act of building, makingAlongside the formal targets and planning process, this PhD and participating, people learn small changes they can makeresearch is investigating whether architecture can be used as towards sustainable living, at the same time as supporting thepart of an active community process enabling people to both visions of government.28
  28. 28. faculty of architecture and fine art Transport Café Future Infrastructure Sports centre Local Park KindergartenClimate neutrality inForMation candidate: Eli Katrina Hatleskog department: Architectural Design and Management phone: (+47) 92 64 06 26 e-mail: eli.hatleskog@ntnu.no education: M.Arch, Architecture Association School of Architecture project start: October 2009 supervisors: Eli Støa (NTNU), Annemie Wyckmans (NTNU), Stig Larssæther (NTNU) 29
  29. 29. phd projects 2010 – 2011 hallgriM hJelMbreKKecorPorate strategy— consequences For choice oF concePt and goVernance in building Projectsproject descriptionstrategic goals and needs researchA corporate strategy describes how the organization has planned The research focuses on how to improve processes and maketo create long term value for the owners, clients and society investments succeed in achieving higher certainty for effect for(Kaplan, Norton 2004). In this strategic thinking are the long- the owner’s core business. The main research question is:term goals described as well as tools and policy instruments «What is the impact for businesses to let the strategic and tacticalwhich are going to be used to obtain those. In a society character- goals govern the objectives of a building project?»ized by growth and changes, a building project is a one of thefrequent (and important) used tools to achieve the strategic and Methodsuperior goals. The research is carried out through a literature study with the following goals: Definitions, search for established process toolssuccess and methods of project governance, tools and methods forTo which extent the project is a success or not will be dependent assessment of effect of projects.on goal achievement on three levels: operational, tactical andstrategic. In the operational perspective the project should be A quantitative survey is set up to determine to which extentcarried out efficiently, delivering the planned outcome regarding management principles and strategic tools used in the organiza-time, cost and quality. In the tactical perspective the main objec- tion as a whole are active in implementation of building projects.tive is to reach the goals with regard to relevance, suitability for A second objective is to determine what the decision basis is forthe user, and effect on productivity. In the superior and strategical building projects and to which extent, areas and levels of goalsperspective the project must have an importance for the organi- are defined.zation’s sustainability (Samset 2003). A set of pilot studies have been accomplished and three majorStrategical processes in building projects case studies will be done with the following focus areas:Most companies perform structured strategic processes and use • Does the project development reflect and implement thethem as a tool to implement an internal general understanding owner’s tactical and strategic corporate goals?and acceptance for tactical and operational actions. • Are there visible connections between strategic, tactical and operational goals in organisational performance and theThe well-performed tactical and strategical processes of project?successful companies are not so visible when it comes to devel- • Are the stated goals connected to the performances afteropment and implementation of investments in building projects. project implementation?It is a paradox that a building project, as a long term investment, • Does management by objectives add significant value andis not subjected to the same principles for overall management by effect?objectives as is the company’s core activities. • Identify evaluation methods and give recommendations for assessment of the effect of project.30
  30. 30. faculty of architecture and fine artThe choice of concept is one of the first and most important actions to align the owners strategic goals with the project.photo: Rambøll inForMation candidate: Hallgrim Hjelmbrekke department: Civil and Transport Engineering phone: (+47) 93 24 31 42 e-mail: hallgrim.hjelmbrekke@ntnu.no education: Master in Real Estate and Facilities Management, NTNU project start: January 2009 supervisors: Geir Hansen (NTNU), Ola Lædre (NTNU) 31
  31. 31. phd projects 2010 – 2011 Karin høylandFrom knowledge about users to PremisesFor Planning«inclusiVe design» as a method For a more user driVen innoVation inarchitectureproject descriptionThe Norwegian State administration wishes to encourage an experienced and used by families with children. The investi-increased focus on usability or the user friendliness of build- gation is introduced by a literature review, providing a mapings and environments. An “inclusive design strategy” aims to of current knowledge within the field of urban childhood. Theincrease this focus. The thesis discusses how inclusive design aim is to identify what the built environment should support inmay be used as an approach to improve user friendliness in children’s everyday life. The architectural quality of the threearchitecture. The overall goal of the research is to show how projects will be discussed in the light of two perspectives: Howknowledge about the interplay between people and the built are the objectives of a child friendly environment expressedenvironment can provide important input in the search for new and translated into physical structures, or in other words:and innovative architectural solutions. More specifically, the What are the buildings meant to do? And how do the usersobjective is to contribute to the development of a planning experience and use them?and design approach within architecture based on “user driveninnovative design”. Finally, the thesis will conclude by discussing implications the findings from the case studies may have for planning and archi-The approach will be further developed through investigating tectural practice and research. How can the results contributea selected user perspective and one type of built environ- to the development of a more user driven approach within thement. The case study focuses on urban housing projects, field of architecture?32
  32. 32. faculty of architecture and fine artphoto: Geir Mogen inForMation candidate: Karin Høyland department: Architectural Design and Management phone: (+47) 93 02 89 01 e-mail: karin.hoyland@ntnu.no, karin.hoyland@sintef.no education: M.Arch, NTNU project start: 2006 supervisor: Eli Støa (NTNU), Geir Hansen (NTNU) 33
  33. 33. phd projects 2010 – 2011 thoMas haavizero emission building enVeloPes— ProPerties, details and solutionsproject descriptionIt is getting more and more obvious that our way of living in the The overall objective of the research is to obtain sustainableindustrialized world is not sustainable. The use of non-regen- building envelope solutions, aiming to reduce the total emis-erating natural resources is not in balance with what nature is sions of the building during the life cycle.able to provide in long term. In this context, the main focus inrecent years has been on global heating caused by greenhouse The research will focus on wall structures with insulation andgas (GHG) emissions. heat storage materials which can be divided into three groups: • High tech materials such as Vacuum Insulation PanelsIn World Energy Outlook – 2008, it is stated that energy (VIP), Aerogels, Gas Filled Panels (GFP) and Phase Changeefficiency is the measure that will give the largest and fastest Materials (PCM).reduction of GHG emissions. With a 450ppm scenario (CO2 • Standard materials such as mineral wool, EPS and XPS.concentration in the atmosphere), which corresponds with an • Low tech materials such as hardwood and wood fibre.aim of 2˚C maximum global temperature increase, it is esti-mated that energy efficiency will have to contribute with 54%of the reductions of GHG emissions.The potential for energy efficiency in buildings is well docu-mented. In this context, insulation of the building envelope isa major contributor, both regarding energy efficiency and cost.34
  34. 34. faculty of architecture and fine artinForMationcandidate: Thomas Haavidepartment: Architectural Design, History and Technologyphone: (+47) 98 23 04 42e-mail: thomas.haavi@ntnu.noeducation: M. Sc. Mechanical Engineering, NTNUproject start: May 2009supervisor: Arild Gustavsen (NTNU) 35
  35. 35. phd projects 2010 – 2011 giedre Jarulaitieneintegrated conserVation in historicwooden towns oF the baltic sea region— the assessment oF conserVation in Practiceproject descriptionThe PhD research study is an analysis of the implementa- such policies in practice. Therefore this PhD research projecttion of conservation plans in practice by assessing the role of is divided into two phases, first of which is focused on thetraditional building skills in protected urban areas. The project in-depth ethnography in the on-going conservation project ofaims at improving the body of knowledge about the urban one building within a chosen case of a protected urban area.conservation in practice by tracing and describing the actual The second phase of the project concentrates on the protectednetworks. There is a hypothesis to be tested that the integrated urban area itself and will involve the exploration of use, supplyurban conservation promotes the use, supply and demand of and demand of traditional building skills and the role of varioustraditional building skills. The main research question aims actors. The second phase will be concluded by conductingat answering the question, “What is the role of traditional an explanatory study of the causal relationships within thebuilding skills in integrated conservation practice and planning described and explored networks.of protected urban areas?”Even though the link between the integrated conservationand the use of traditional materials and skills was stated bythe international legislative documents already in the 1970’s,very little research has been done on the implementation of36
  36. 36. faculty of architecture and fine artThe example of traditional materials used in conservation, Kokkola (Finland), 2008.photo: Giedre Jarulaitiene inForMation candidate: Giedre Jarulaitiene department: Architectural Design, History and Technology phone: (+47) 73 55 12 58 e-mail: giedre.jarulaitiene@ntnu.no education: Master in Heritage Conservation and Management, Vilniaus Universitetas project start: August 2007 supervisors: Eir Ragna Grytli (NTNU), Dag Kittang (NTNU) 37
  37. 37. phd projects 2010 – 2011 Kari hovin KJølleboundary objects as translationinstruments— a strategy For a decision-making Process in brieFing and design oFsPaces For interactionproject descriptionThe purpose of the PhD project is to gain knowledge andfurther understanding of the relationship between the user’sbrief and the design of physical environment for interactions inthe knowledge workplace.The project aims to contribute to the knowledge and under-standing of how architects and interior designers interpretuser needs into the design of knowledge workplaces. Theinvestigations will be limited to the briefing and design stages.Furthermore, the investigations will be limited to a focus onhow workplaces for collaboration and interaction are trans-formed and implemented into design.The main focus is on how instruments as ‘boundary objects’ canbe used as a means of translation and may make the briefingand the design processes easier. The concept ‘boundaryobjects’ is derived from the field of science and technologystudies. Boundary objects are defined as half-worked createdobjects, non-human objects such as artefacts, tools, methodsand analytical concepts which maintain a common identityacross borders during the transformation phase.38
  38. 38. faculty of architecture and fine artActivities and artefacts defined as boundary objects used in a briefing process.photo: Kari Hovin Kjølle inForMation candidate: Kari Hovin Kjølle department: Architectural Design and Management, Department of Buildings (SINTEF) phone: (+47) 93 20 68 05 e-mail: kari.h.kjolle@sintef.no education: M. Arch NTNU project start: September 2004 supervisors: Siri Hunnes Blakstad (NTNU), Thomas Berker (NTNU), Geir Karsten Hansen (NTNU), Tore I. Haugen (NTNU) 39
  39. 39. phd projects 2010 – 2011 nora Johanne Klungseththe municiPal cleaning serViceproject descriptionThe research project will investigate the importance of thebuilt environment for cleaners and has the municipal cleanerin centre of investigations. The research project will look intothe history and future development of the municipal cleaningservice and describe the municipal cleaning service today.The goal for the research project is to gain knowledge regardingcleaning services in municipalities and regarding buildings’impact upon cleaning services abilities to support the corebusiness through seeing building as an enabler and an obstaclefor municipal cleaners.The purpose of the research project is to provide new knowl-edge that contributes to developing and improving today’smunicipal facility management. Knowledge that later can beutilized in briefing and design processes and knowledge thatcontributes to an increased focus on, and discussion of, theusability of buildings.40
  40. 40. faculty of architecture and fine artphoto: Nora Johanne Klungseth inForMation candidate: Nora Johanne Klungseth department: Architectural Design and Management phone: (+47) 97 57 31 48 e-mail: nora.klungseth@ntnu.no education: M.Sc. Real Estate and Facility Management, NTNU project start: August 2009 supervisors: Siri Blakstad (NTNU), Nils Olsson (NTNU), Kirsten Arge (SINTEF) 41
  41. 41. phd projects 2010 – 2011 tore KolåsPerFormance oF daylight redirectionsystems For high latitudesproject descriptionUtilization of the daylight resource is highly desired in most simulations. The software TracePro is used to predict the lightbuildings. For side-lighted spaces it is a general problem that distribution that can be obtained in a side-lighted space undermost of the diffuse daylight reaches the perimeter zone, and various daylight conditions. The main focus of these studiesthe illuminance levels decrease rapidly with the distance from is on the commonly used venetian blind; including both thethe window wall. Direct sunlight is often kept out of the inte- traditional white blind as well as the reflective daylight redi-riors to reduce glare problems, and as a consequence, building recting blind. The simulations verify previous findings andinteriors are often lighted by artificial sources even at times show that both the optical properties of the blind slats as wellwhen natural daylight is abundant. as geometrical factors, including the blind tilt, play a major role in determining interior daylight levels. Another type of daylightDaylight redirection systems are designed to guide daylight redirection system studied in this project is the laser-cut panel.towards the back of a room via the ceiling. By this approach As can be seen from the illustration, the laser-cut panel willa more even light distribution can be obtained, and direct influence the view out towards the surroundings.sunlight can be utilized without causing visual discomfort forthe building occupants. In addition to daylight supply and daylight distribution, the potential for viewing is also included as one of the importantIn this project the performance of various daylight redirection performance criteria proposed in a new evaluation method forsystems is investigated, primarily with the aid of computer daylight redirection systems.42
  42. 42. faculty of architecture and fine artinForMationcandidate: Tore Kolåsdepartment: SINTEF ICTphone: (+47) 73 59 36 67e-mail: tore.kolas@sintef.noeducation: M.Sc. NTNUproject start: August 2004supervisor: Barbara Matusiak (NTNU) 43
  43. 43. phd projects 2010 – 2011 nicola lolliachieVe zero emission buildings:the case study oF myhrerenga— aPProach to green house gases emission abatement in residentialenergy retroFittingproject descriptionThe Green House Gases emissions from the building industry Zero Emission levels can be pursued through low-embodiedis one of the leading causes of the current climatic changes energy and low-emission materials which provide better insu-and are associated with the building envelope in two ways: lation characteristics than materials commonly employed inthrough the life cycle of buildings and through energy the building sector.consumption used to achieve indoor physical comfort. Sincethe material production has been run mainly for the last 50 In order to achieve the above described objectives the researchyears by the industrial chains using non-renewable energy is focused on the Myhrerenga Housing cooperative whichsources, the apartment stocks, which were built during this consists of 7 apartment blocks built in 1967-1968, locatedtime span, can be considered responsible for huge amounts of near Oslo. The research is based on a series of Life CycleGHG emissions. Assessment analyses to be carried out using some of the retrofitting solutions applied to the case study. Each technicalConsequently, the main research issue revolves around how solution is intended to deliver a passive house standard ofto meet a Zero Carbon Emission Building standard with the energy requirement for the building and is analysed in termscurrent energy use and the poor thermal performance of of embodied emissions of the materials employed. Each tech-existing buildings through aimed retrofitting. Of course, the nical solution is then studied from the perspective of architec-retrofitting involves mainly the improvement of thermal prop- tural flexibility. The above described two criteria are eventuallyerties of the building envelopes. Therefore, the aim of achieving matched together in a matrix of assessment criteria.44
  44. 44. faculty of architecture and fine artinForMationcandidate: Nicola Lollidepartment: Architectural Design, History and Technologyphone: (+47) 45 06 33 20e-mail: nicola.lolli@ntnu.noeducation: M.Arch, Terza Universitá degli Studi di Romaproject start: September 2009supervisors: Anne Grete Hestnes (NTNU), Øyvind Aschehoug (NTNU) 45
  45. 45. phd projects 2010 – 2011 claudia Moscosothe imPact oF light and color at thePerceiVed quality oF sustainable architecture— studies with adVanced audioVisual equiPmentproject descriptionSustainable development has gained strength in several disci- counter-productive for human activities in the long term. Theplines in the recent years and architecture has not been exempt current inner ethos of the lighting community is to assure afrom this. The amount of natural light that buildings will have in balance between energy efficient lighting and well-lit environ-the future is strongly linked with the growth of the population ments that will provide well being and comfort.in cities and the amount of air pollution, among others. It hasbeen addressed that one of the possible solutions to creating The aim of this research is thus, to acquire further knowledgeenergy efficient buildings will have a direct relation with the of the impact of light and colour on the perception of architec-fenestration design. Having this in consideration, the future tural space. Once this is scientifically studied, it will be sensiblefenestration will have to find renewed standards regarding to establish new design guidelines of how light contributessolar energy in the new sustainable building codes. to the architectural space to achieve comfort. It will go from the subjective to the objective: the research will attempt toIn 1943, a psychological theory was presented by Abraham develop a mapping between the light and colour qualities andMaslow, concerning his studies of the human’s hierarchy of their correlation with architectural quality descriptors.needs where he focused on the stages of growth in humans.Considering the work camp of this program and Maslow’s As a parallel research, but not less important, the studies willstudies, we can place daylight exposure on a first level, as a be conducted making use of new advanced technologicalcrucial physiological need for human beings and artificial light methods. Virtual environments will simulate real rooms, whichon a second level, due to its importance to human activity can solve the logistics problems that architecture researchersand its subsequent safety. It is then evident that natural and find when trying to conduct investigation experiments. Virtualartificial light have a strong importance in the development environment experiments can provide more cost-effectiveof our life. A development which makes us think of the future experiments due to less space required, which in turn means aand how to cover our basic needs. It is then valid to predict the quicker data collection and evaluation process. These simula-future standards for architecture in correlation with lighting. tion methods will be compared with real environment studiesApproximately 80% of our time is spent indoors and we to prove the accuracy of the results. If the difference betweenhave recognized that natural and artificial light are crucial for the results is not significant, this could very well become thethe development of our life. To reduce the quality of natural future of architectural studies, using these aids effectively toand artificial lighting on an energy-efficiency basis would be conserve space and time with less resources.46
  46. 46. faculty of architecture and fine artLighting studies carried out by students in the ROMLAB, AB - Faculty, NTNUphoto: Barbara Matusiak inForMation candidate: Claudia Trinidad Moscoso Paredes department: Architectural Design, Form and Colour Studies phone: (+47) 73 59 50 95 e-mail: claudia.moscoso@ntnu.no education: Professional Title of Architect, Universidad Ricardo Palma (Lima-Peru) project start: August 2010 supervisors: Barbara Matusiak (NTNU), Gro Lauvland (NTNU) 47
  47. 47. phd projects 2010 – 2011 albogasto John ng’asiPost-conFlict reconstruction and recoVery:the case oF land and ProPerty disPutesand claims in northern ugandaproject descriptionThe focus of this project is to examine land and property might be approached constructively in a way which furthersdisputes and claims in a post-conflict context. There is no both choice and the prospects for a stable societal recovery.doubt that violent conflicts are often behind people fleeing their The project would like to contribute to the theoretical frame-homes and abandoning their land and other property in order work involved in the handling of the critical resource of land,to save their lives. As relative peace re-emerges, returnees end thus playing a key role in contributing to a peaceful and stableup going back to their original homes and start to rebuild their recovery after the conflict.lives by reinstating claims to the only and often most poten-tially valuable resource left: land. Reinstating claims to land Approaching the research project, three main intertwinedremains the most contested issue and the centre of political themes will be disentangled. These are: the prevailing attitudesand social confrontation. Northern Uganda is a case in point, towards land and property disputes and claims as exposedwhereas the large-scale return of internally displaced people within the post-conflict context, the changing modes of landhas lead to conflicting claims to land and property ownership. and property ownership, and how the two themes stand aThe conflicting claims is a result of the clash between different chance in guiding efforts directed towards early reconstruc-modes of land and property ownership and claims on one tion and recovery. The project’s objective sets out to “examinehand, and the post-conflict attitudes towards land and prop- how war has impacted land and property disputes and claimserty claims on the other hand, thus making the region a hotbed within the post-conflict reconstruction and recovery nexus”.of legal wrangling.It is against this contextual backdrop that this research projectaims at understanding how both land and property claims48
  48. 48. faculty of architecture and fine artPost-conflict Commodification of land.photo: Albogasto John Ng’asi inForMation candidate: Albogasto John Ng’asi department: Urban Design and Planning phone: (+47) 73 59 50 15, (+47) 974 12 943 e-mail: albogasto.ngasi@ntnu.no education: MPHL Degree in Development Studies, NTNU project start: August 2008 supervisors: Hans Skotte (NTNU), Liv Haram (NTNU) 49
  49. 49. phd projects 2010 – 2011 birgit risholtrenoVating existing buildings usingmultiFunctional systems For achieVingoPtimal thermal PerFormance oF thebuilding enVeloPeproject description40% of energy use in Norway is related to buildings and the for energy collection and storage when renovating the buildingbuilding sector. 80% of the buildings existing today will still envelope shall be evaluated. Criteria and possible solutions forbe in use in 2050. Energy savings in the Norwegian building multifunctional building envelope systems shall be developed.sector have a potential of saving 12 TWh before 2020. For all solutions and products, criteria fit for use in Norwegian wood frame buildings shall be discussed. The results can beIn Norway there are approximately 2.44 million dwellings used by construction product manufacturers in their productincluding 1.2 million single family houses in Norway. The development.energy consumption related to single family houses was 30TWh in 2009. To realize the potential for energy saving in the Building owners need knowledge to select more energy effi-building sector, it is important that these buildings are reno- cient measures for renovation. A methodology for assessmentvated for optimal thermal performance. The PhD study focuses of existing buildings and renovation measures shall be estab-on existing single family houses and the possibilities for reno- lished for single family wood frame houses. Based on informa-vating these buildings to zero emission levels. tion retrieved regarding location, construction and state of the existing building the building owner shall have the neededThe building industry needs knowledge to develop more information basis for choosing renovation solutions for optimalenergy efficient solutions. Incorporating innovative technology thermal performance of the building envelope.50
  50. 50. faculty of architecture and fine artRenovating existing buildings using multifunctional systems for achieving optimal thermal performance of the building envelope.photo: Birgit Risholt inForMation candidate: Birgit Risholt department: Architectural Design, History and Technology e-mail: birgit.risholt@ntnu.no education: M.Sc. NTNU project start: February 2010 supervisors: Professor Anne Grete Hestnes (NTNU), Berit Time (SINTEF), Tore Kvande (NTNU) 51
  51. 51. phd projects 2010 – 2011 geir harald saMuelsenimages oF graVity— art and climbing as reVersible exPeriencesproject descriptionIl n’y a pas d’homme intérieur, l’homme est au monde et c’est dans Is it reasonable to imagine that the artistic thinking is playedle monde qu’il se connait 1 out in the experience that expresses itself through his climbing?Maurice Merleau-Ponty And vice versa, can one imagine that his attraction to this rather unique form of movement that climbing is, similarly isThe objective of the project is to produce images, films and played out in his work with painting, film and photography?texts that establish a new and hybrid field of study, basedon the research fellow’s experiences both as an artist and a The work in this fellowship period is revolving around theclimber. In other words, the project examines climbing and art production and presentation of films, images and texts andas two overlapping or even reversible experiences. thus examines the ideas and artworks that unfolds when the fellow confronts himself and others with such ideas as outlinedSince the mid 80’s, the fellow has spent a lot of time on art, above. Similarly, he wishes to reflect around what artisticand almost as much time on climbing. Some of the experiences thinking can be and what in this case might be special with hisfrom the two different disciplines have similarities with each own artistic thinking. How does it manifest itself in his films,other. Could it be that climbing is unfolding in images and that photos, paintings and texts? And does this artistic thinkingan artistic thinking resonate in climbing? The research fellow unfold itself in climbing?will to some extent assume that his work with images is linkedto a desire to be in contact with a personal artistic thinking. Bythe same token he will also assume that his climbing is linkedto a personal bodily experience.1 There is no inner man. Man is in the world, and only in the world does he know himself. M.M.P. The phenomenology of the Body. English version52
  52. 52. faculty of architecture and fine artCatching light, 2010. Videostill by Geir Harald Samuelsen. inForMation candidate: Geir Harald Samuelsen department: The Trondheim Academy of Fine Art phone: (+47) 97 58 71 75 e-mail: geirsamu@online.no education: KHIO, Glasgow School of Art, University of Oslo project start: October 2009 supervisors: John Murphy (NTNU/KiT), Eivind Røssaak (Nasjonalbiblioteket) 53
  53. 53. phd projects 2010 – 2011 Pranita shresthaPolicy making From goVernment togoVernance— case oF making housing Policy For squatter settlements inkathmandu, nePalproject descriptionThe main aim of this research is to examine the shift in public decision or a set of decisions: why they were taken, how theymanagement from government to a multi – scale, polycentric were implemented, and with what results (Yin, 2003, p. 12).model of governance specifically in the case of making housing The main case studies will be the process of formation of apolicy for urban poor – an insight into not only the development recent National Level Policy for squatter settlements which isand growth of squatter settlements but also into the realpolitik being dealt with by the Department of Urban Development andof housing policy making in the specific context of Kathmandu, Building Construction (DUDBC) under the Ministry of Physicalthe capital of Nepal. In the context of Nepal, squatter settle- Planning and Works. Other case studies will deal with an over-ments are defined as informal settlements of urban poor, view of two geographically different squatter settlements inimmigrant and marginalized populations on non-claimed land the capital selected according to their respective age. Within(Joshi and Bjonness, 1987). the case study method, the main sources of data generation will be interviews, conversations and observations.Since the focus of this research is an in – depth analysis of aprocess, the most appropriate method is case-study method.The essence of a case study is that it tries to illuminate a54
  54. 54. faculty of architecture and fine art‘Khadi Pakha’ is one of the 45 squatter settlements in the capital Kathmandu established in 1981.photo: Pranita Shrestha inForMation candidate: Pranita Shrestha department: Department of Urban Design and Planning phone: (+47) 73 59 50 21 e-mail: pranita.shrestha@ntnu.no education: M.Sc. Urban Ecological Planning NTNU project start: August 2009 supervisors: Rolee Aranya (NTNU, Hans Christie Bjønness (NTNU) 55
  55. 55. phd projects 2010 – 2011 sverre sondresena modern tectonic reading oF the buildingheritage— a method For Finding new architectural concePtsproject descriptionThe aim for this thesis is to make use of the tectonic notion asan analytic instrument in the process of finding modern archi-tectural answers. The project seeks to use the tectonic notionas a practical and pedagogical method for analysing differentbuilding- traditions, with the aim of making modern expres-sions and new architectural concepts based on this traditionalbuilding knowledge.The investigation is to be carried out both as full-scale projects(with investigation and documentation during and after thebuilding process), workshops and student-courses.«The architects most important task is not to invent a big bang,but to be sure that the gunpowder is kept dry», Odd Østbye.«Every place and time has its own expression, without this –there is no identity», Svein Hatløy.56
  56. 56. faculty of architecture and fine art«Prøvrbustad i Hjartdal»illustration: Mir inForMation candidate: Sverre Sondresen department: Architectural Design and Management phone: (+47) 92 40 33 38 e-mail: sverresondresen@gmail.com education: Architect, Bergen School of Architecture project start: 2010 supervisors: Bendik Manum (NTNU), Bjørn Otto Braaten (NTNU) 57
  57. 57. phd projects 2010 – 2011 britt sørliethe Village building— a new tyPology in architecture as a Possible sustainablePlanning strategyproject descriptionSprawl, as a result of growing cities or as part of rural settle- with environmental, social and economical aspects in relationments in the districts, must be addressed in relation to to sustainability, and is formulated as follows: «Is the Villagesustainable development. A concept for a new typology was Building a sustainable alternative for future development?» Threedeveloped by Mathias Harang, in collaboration, as an entry objectives have been put forward: 1) to evaluate social qualitiesto an open international ideas competition in 2007. A typical related to the Village Building; 2) to evaluate are-use, energy-Norwegian valley was twisted to an urban melting pot for 5000 use and economy related to the Village Building; 3) to furtherpeople, with sustainable potentials. The project was called develop the Village Building as an exhibition, and evaluatethe Village Building. It confronted the sometimes superficial responses.environmental debate by rearranging known built parameters,challenging low and widespread built fabric in the countryside. The project is investigated within a Norwegian context, but may also be applicable to different areas and climates aroundConnections between settlement patterns, building form and the world.the use of recourses are essential in the research on the VillageBuilding, and the aim is to gain more knowledge about thisconcept and to see if and to what degree this way of thinkingcould work. The research question includes investigations58
  58. 58. faculty of architecture and fine artinForMationcandidate: Britt Sørliedepartment: Architectural Design, History and Technologyphone: (+47) 73 59 47 90e-mail: britt.sorlie@ntnu.noeducation: M.Arch, NTNUproject start: November 2008supervisors: Anne Grete Hestnes (NTNU), Eli Støa (NTNU) 59

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