Advisers as Advocates for Study Abroad

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Concurrent session from 2013 NACADA Annual Conference in Salt Lake, UT.

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Advisers as Advocates for Study Abroad

  1. 1. Elevating Students to Global Citizenship: Advisors as Advocates for Study Abroad Julie Larsen University of Washington Blake Hart SIT Study Abroad
  2. 2. Disclaimer: We approach education abroad as a powerful way to holistically educate students through: – Defining personal values – A greater appreciation for global citizenship – Connecting education abroad to meaningful life work
  3. 3. Who is in the room?
  4. 4. “Lowenstein (2006) declared that ‘an excellent advisor does for students’ entire education what the excellent teacher does for a course: helps them order the pieces, put them together to make a coherent whole, so that the student experiences the curriculum not as a checklist of discrete, isolated pieces but instead as a unity, a composition of interrelated parts with multiple connections and relationships’”. – Retrieved from CAS Standards Contextual Statement
  5. 5. Reciprocal Exchange Direct Enroll Affiliates/Program Providers Faculty-led Program Types
  6. 6. Program Structure Integrated Island Hybrid
  7. 7. Academic Offerings Full Curriculum Thematic Focus Intensive Language Intern/Teach/Volunteer Field Study Undergraduate Research Service Learning
  8. 8. Why is This Important? Challenge vs. Support Curricular Integration vs. Holistic Learning Same Same but Different
  9. 9. Study Abroad Student Profile Female 64% Male 36% Gender Institute of International Education. (2012). "Profile of U.S. Study Abroad Students, 2000/01-2010/11." Open Doors Report on International Educational Exchange. Retrieved from http://www.iie.org/opendoors
  10. 10. Study Abroad Student Profile 78% 8% 7% 5% 2% -1% Ethnicity Caucasion Asian/Pacific Islander Hispanic/Latino(a) African American Multiracial American Indian or Alaska Native Institute of International Education. (2012). "Profile of U.S. Study Abroad Students, 2000/01-2010/11." Open Doors Report on International Educational Exchange. Retrieved from http://www.iie.org/opendoors
  11. 11. Study Abroad Student Profile 4% 13% 38% 25% 11% 9% Academic Level Freshman Sophomore Junior Senior Bachelor's (Unspecified) Master's Institute of International Education. (2012). "Profile of U.S. Study Abroad Students, 2000/01-2010/11." Open Doors Report on International Educational Exchange. Retrieved from http://www.iie.org/opendoors
  12. 12. Study Abroad Student Profile Institute of International Education. (2012). "Fields of Study of U.S. Study Abroad Students, 2000/01-2010/11." Open Doors Report on International Educational Exchange. Retrieved from http://www.iie.org/opendoors 0 5 10 15 20 25 Field of Study 2000/2001 2010/2011
  13. 13. Factors Affecting Participation Greatest predictors of study abroad participation: • Gender • Academic level (junior, senior, etc.) • Race • GPA • Extent of previous travel within the US Gender-related differences contributing to study abroad participation: • Females > males are influenced by parents & other important people in their lives to study abroad • Females > males indicate a job or internship as a barrier • Females > males perceived the cost as a barrier • Males > females were worried study abroad would delay their graduation BaileyShea, Chelsea. “Factors that affect American college students’ participation in study abroad." doctoral PhD diss., University of Rochester, 2009.
  14. 14. Deciding to Apply 1. The extent to which the student perceived the institution/faculty was supportive of international study 2. Fears that studying abroad might delay graduation 3. Financial constraints 4. Perceived support by family and friends 5. The opportunity to travel during college 6. The opportunity to explore and discover more about the world and oneself 7. Grade point average and foreign language prerequisites 8. The idea that international study may enhance career opportunities BaileyShea, Chelsea. “Factors that affect American college students’ participation in study abroad." doctoral PhD diss., University of Rochester, 2009.
  15. 15. Recognizing the Applicant The Perfect Fit major • deep interest • up for challenge • inquisitive • researched & prepared The Legacy parents/grandparents/siblings/best friend studied there The Heritage Seeker first generation • pressure from parents/grandparents • culture & language The Language Learner immersion main focus • secondary requirement The “Good Times” Seeker academics secondary • location primary • “is there a beach?” • adventure
  16. 16. Academic Success • Graduation rates • Time to degree • Retention • GPA • Language acquisition • Increased engagement post-study abroad • Increased intercultural competence Salisbury, Mark Hungerford. "The effect of study abroad on intercultural competence among undergraduate college students." doctoral PhD diss., University of Iowa, 2011.
  17. 17. What value do we see in study abroad and exchange programs?
  18. 18. Bloom’s Taxonomy Image from here.
  19. 19. Perry’s Moral and Intellectual Development
  20. 20. • Dualism – USA vs the world • Multiplicity – Colorblind and supporting everyone – we are all “equal” • Relativism – How do I get support for my opinions, what experiences support my ideas? • Commitment – Making choices in a contextual world
  21. 21. Synthesis of their academic experience needs to be paramount.
  22. 22. What barriers can you anticipate/have you seen upon returning to campus?
  23. 23. Connecting Back to Campus • Value to degree – Tangible connection to degree – Higher level of engagement with curriculum – Additional academic interests • Career Development – Awareness of global markets – Ability to work in new situations – Reflective experiences
  24. 24. "Curriculum Integration in Study Abroad" (CI) refers to a variety of institutional approaches designed to fully integrate study abroad options into the college experience and academic curricula for students in all majors. -NAFSA: Association of International Educators Curriculum Integration
  25. 25. CI Best Practices Beloit College • “Off-campus study is not an isolated experience for individual students, but instead is integral to the Beloit College curriculum” • Invest in faculty development • Bring education abroad back to campus University of Texas • Created a collaborative relationship with academic departments • Pre-approved major and core classes • Created major-specific brochures with degree maps University of Minnesota • Created “The Minnesota Model” that many universities have now adopted “Curriculum Integration: Best Practices” at NAFSA.org for a comprehensive list
  26. 26. The Minnesota Model • Internationalize campus by sending 50% abroad • Only 15% studied abroad in late-1990s • Within the Institute of Technology, 15 of 4,300 studied abroad • Engaged academic departments to vet programs and lead their own • Today, 30% of students study abroad Fischer, Karin. "U. of Minnesota integrates study abroad into the curriculum." The Chronicle of Higher Education, 2010.
  27. 27. The Minnesota Model “Assess, Match, Motivate” • Increased study abroad scholarships • Increased availability of low-cost programsFinances • Work with faculty & advisors to match courses • Make study abroad integral, not “extra”Fit • Educating faculty on importance & variety • Having faculty take ownership on approvalFaculty • Debunking common myths • A natural part of academic advisingFear • Materials specifically for parents/families • Acquiring new friends through study abroadFamily & Friends
  28. 28. Hulstrand, Janet. “Curricular integration: it’s a marathon, not a sprint." The Forum on Education Abroad, 2012.
  29. 29. “My experience abroad reemphasized where my interests lay, both personally and academically, and at the same time provided a holistic and invaluable aspect to my education involving insight into the human condition. Although people of different cultures and traditions may vary, certain human aspects have basic universal components worldwide. The interactions I had with several Kenyans emphasized those components and allowed me to expand my perception of people and my respect for differences.” —SIT Kenya Alum
  30. 30. What happens after education abroad?
  31. 31. Questions?

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