Psycousineau

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Psycousineau

  1. 1. Effective Teaching Strategies for Nonfiction text<br />By: Robert Cousineau<br />Southern York County School District<br />
  2. 2. introduction<br />Tell me about yourself:<br />Content area?<br />Grades you teach?<br />Anything your students struggle with when it comes to reading nonfiction text?<br />
  3. 3. It all starts with…<br />
  4. 4. How to set yourself up for success<br />Make the expectations VERY CLEAR throughout the entire school year.<br />Convince your students that the strategies work. <br />Use a variety of reading strategies throughout the year but try to choose one that is your “go to strategy.”<br /><ul><li>This will prevent students from getting bored with one strategy.
  5. 5. Having a “go to strategy” will save you time with planning.
  6. 6. If possible, have your entire department on board with a “go to strategy” – even at the elementary level.</li></li></ul><li>Make your students believe in the strategies<br />The more effort you put into proving to your students that the reading strategies work, the less the students will believe you are trying to torture them with extra work. <br />
  7. 7. Show your students the research that convinced us as educators. <br />
  8. 8. President Obama using a reading strategy<br />
  9. 9. Intro to Reading Strategies <br />Talking to the Text – metacognitive (or think out loud) strategy.<br />Summarization – we will explore a few summarization techniques. <br />Document Based Questioning (DBQ)<br />White-out Detective Method – more of a vocabulary based strategy but still used with class readings. <br />
  10. 10. Talking-To-The-Text (TTTT)<br />TTTT is a metacognitive strategy. This means that a student is going to actively think about what he/she reads (it holds them responsible!).<br />Overall, it is a relatively easy strategy to incorporate in the classroom and most importantly, it is effective!<br />
  11. 11. Here is how TTTT Works<br />While students read, they think out loud by writing down their thoughts on the reading.<br />Students will write in their comments in the margins or use sticky notes if there is not margin space. <br />Students will need a TTTT prompt that will guide them in what type of comments to make. <br />
  12. 12. Let’s practice the strategy<br />Refer to handout #2-3.<br />Find the TTTT bookmark. <br />Let me demonstrate the first paragraph. <br />Finish reading the article and TTTT at least seven times (an average of one time per paragraph).<br />Share with the person next to you a few of your comments.<br />Group discussion. <br />
  13. 13. Let’s look at some student examples<br />Take 30 seconds to look at each student example. I will indicate when to pass the student example. <br />
  14. 14. Other examples of tttt<br />See examples. <br />
  15. 15. Tips for talking to the text<br />Create margins large enough that the students can write comments. <br />If margins are not possible, use sticky notes. See examples.<br />Make the expectations clear. This includes the quantity and variety of TTTT comments. <br /><ul><li>Students will want to only ask questions.
  16. 16. Set aside time to discuss comments as a class.
  17. 17. Remind students to use a strategy like TTTT on tests. </li></li></ul><li>The advantages that I have seen from tttt<br />Students are more prepared for class discussion. Students will also feel more confident to contribute to class discussion. <br />The students are engaged in the reading.<br />Students’ success will increase. <br />
  18. 18. summarization<br />This is an area of major concern with students. Our data shows that students struggle with summarization. <br />There are multiple ways that students can summarize a text and I suggest you use them all.<br />We will start with the 25 word abstract summary. <br />
  19. 19. 25 word abstract summary<br />A 25 word abstract summary is when a student will read a text and create a 25 word summary of the key points. <br />It may sound simple, but students will struggle!<br />It is critical that you spend time setting the students up for success. <br />
  20. 20. Why do students struggle? <br />Some students want to include details that are unnecessary – high achieving students commonly make this mistake.<br />Solution: Demonstrate the strategy for the students a few times. For example…<br />Some students only want to write the first sentence to each paragraph. <br />Solution: Explain to the students that the first sentence typically introduces the paragraph and does not effectively summarize the paragraph. <br />BIG PICTURE: This strategy takes time but will significantly improve student achievement in the area of summarization. <br />
  21. 21. Let’s try IT!<br />Refer to handout 5-7<br />Grab a highlighter. <br />Read the handout and highlight key points. <br />Work with a partner to write the 25 word abstract. <br />After writing a rough draft, take a marker and write a final draft on a large piece of paper. <br />Good luck!<br />
  22. 22. Now Let’s look at a Student Example <br />Refer to handout #8<br />
  23. 23. Now Let’s look at other summarization strategies<br />Refer to handout #9<br />
  24. 24. White-out Detective method<br />This method will help students with vocabulary and reading comprehension. The method is especially effective with more challenging readings. <br />It requires some extra planning as a teacher, but requires little instruction to the students. <br />
  25. 25. How to use<br />Take a reading and white-out key vocabulary words or challenging words the students may not know. <br />Define and discuss the words with the students before the reading is assigned. <br />After the students finish reading, check and discuss student progress. <br />
  26. 26. Let’s Try It!<br />Refer to handout #10-11<br />
  27. 27. Document Based Questions (DBQ)<br />This strategy is primarily for the area of social studies because it focuses on primary sources. <br />If there is ever a keystone exam in social studies, there will be a heavy focus on primary sources. <br />With DBQ’s, students read primary sources and answer questions which assess their understanding of the sources. Then, students usually respond to a specific question that allows them to express their interpretation of the the source. <br />
  28. 28. Review <br />TTTT – Holds students responsible by having them think out loud. This strategy is an active learning technique which will increase reading comprehension. <br />25-word abstract summary – This strategy requires a good deal of instruction, but is important because data shows that our students are weak in summarization. <br />White-out method – This strategy includes a lot of preparation on the teacher’s part, but will help with vocabulary and reading comprehension. This strategy is helpful with challenging readings. <br />
  29. 29. How to set yourself up for success<br />Make the expectations VERY CLEAR throughout the entire school year.<br />Convince your students that the strategies work. <br />Use a variety of reading strategies throughout the year but try to choose one that is your “go to strategy.”<br /><ul><li>This will prevent your students from getting bored with one strategy.
  30. 30. Having a “go to strategy” will save you time with planning.
  31. 31. If possible, have your entire department on board with a “go to strategy” – even at the elementary level.</li>

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