Be the Coach, not the Player! Julie B. Wise twitter.com/readingsecrets [email_address] facebook.com/myreadingsecrets www.m...
What do coaches do? <ul><li>Coaches model what they want their players to do. </li></ul><ul><li>Coaches engage players in ...
What do coaches do? Coaches model what they want their players to do.
What do coaches do? Coaches engage players in the process of the game.
Before you read warm up your brain by While you read use your brain muscles by After your read cool down your brain by Bef...
Coaches engage players in strategies for that specific sport. FOR ONE PURPOSE
Level:_____ Text: _______  Focus: _________________ BEFORE READING (2-3 minutes) DURING READING (8 – 10 minutes) AFTER REA...
Predict Question Clarify Connect Visualize Summarize Before I want you to  predict the next event  in the story, using wha...
Proper Equipment Strategy Engagement Text Predict Sticky Notes/ Highlighter Novel Question Human Paragraph Magazine Clarif...
Inferring Lesson Plan <ul><li>Intro text:  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>This is a  Realistic Comic Strip  about how  a family is ...
 
Why would you want spit in your mouth? 1. 2. 3. 1 2 3 In the text  In your head Using at least three examples from the pas...
Before you read warm up your brain by Text Walk Spit Information While you read use your brain muscles by Identifying how ...
Level: Fifth Text: What’s Spit  Focus: Summarizing strategy BEFORE READING (2-3 minutes) DURING READING (8 – 10 minutes) A...
What’s Spit? Pull a lollipop out of your mouth and you’ll see it. Wake up after drooling on your pillow and you’ll feel it...
Clarifying Lesson Plan Level:Second Text: Owl Moon Focus: Clarifying strategy BEFORE READING (2-3 minutes) DURING READING ...
Before you read warm up your brain by Picture Walk Owl Hunting Information Winter While you read use your brain muscles by...
Owl Moon  by Jane Yolen I could hear it through the woolen cap Pa had pulled down over my ears. A farm dog answered the tr...
Questioning Lesson Plan Level: Fourth Text: New Year Snowbird Focus: Questioning strategy BEFORE READING (2-3 minutes) DUR...
New Year Snowbird by Christine Boyka Kluge In the night, in the snow, on the swings, my glistening boots become wings I fl...
Dice Discussion Who What When/Where Why How Which
Predicting Lesson Plan Level: First Text: Widget Focus: Predicting strategy BEFORE READING (2-3 minutes) DURING READING (8...
1 2 4 3 1 – Who was your favorite character.?Why? 2 –  Who was your least favorite character? Why? 3 – Could there be char...
Theme:  How we relate to each other Others may help us, but we must figure out who we really are on our own. Genre Element...
Glow:  What is one aspect of your teaching that can be validated? Grow:  What is one aspect of your teaching you now reali...
Make Connections Lesson Plan Level: Third Text: Thomas’s Snowsuit  Focus: Make Connection BEFORE READING (2-3 minutes) DUR...
Visualize Lesson Plan Level: Second Text: Perfect Container  Focus: Visualize Strategy BEFORE READING (2-3 minutes) DURING...
 
Think marks Genre Elements Character Setting Plot Theme Reading Strategies Predicting Making Connections Questions Author’...
Think marks Genre Elements Author’s Purpose Main Idea Supporting Details Vocabulary Reading Strategies Making Connections ...
Think marks Genre Elements Emotion Sensory Images Music Theme Reading Strategies Clarify Make Connections Questions Author...
<ul><li>Topics for theme: </li></ul><ul><li>Childhood race relations self-improvement trust death </li></ul><ul><li>Courag...
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Julie b. wise capital reading council

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Be the Coach, Not the Player
2, 4, 6, 8, guided reading can be great! When you're in a huddle with a small group of students, you don't have time to improvise. Transform your guided reading into a fast paced, interactive competition that will leave your students laughing, learning and improving their comprehension. Experience how six strategies help students control their thinking and improve their memory. Join Julie B. Wise to discover how cognitive coaching can encourage students to read a variety of short texts with interest, motivation and engagement.

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  • If you noticed from the film, the teacher was in the background. The students were the ones doing the work and the teacher was there to support, encourage and push the students. Let’s take a few minutes to think about what we can learn from good coaches. Coaches lecture while they demonstrate a certain skill. Just standing there using words isn’t going to have the same impact. They waste time and sometimes confuse the students. As expert readers, we must become pros and sharpen our think alouds. We must plan how best to share our academic thinking with students rather than improvising. We need to make the invisible thinking processes visible, not just with reading challenging texts but also how we get stuck, figure out words, ask questions, solve problems, hypothesize and analyze. Football coaches start out pushing a sled, then move on to another play and then add it into a scrimmage. When teaching students how to interact with an academic text, you must break down thinking into more tangible components and practice these with the support of the teacher. Lev Vygotsky’s zone of proximal development suggests a gradual release of responsibility within an authentic, supportive environment. Jeff Zwiers suggests a 30-30-30 scaffolding approach. 30% teacher modeling, 30% cooperative group work and 30% independent work. We all know sports differ in rules, equipment and vocabulary. Dribbling to a basketball coach means bouncing the ball with your hands. However, to a soccer coach, dribbling means kicking the ball with your feet. A strike for a baseball team will mean something different than a strike for a bowling team. As expert readers, we have been immersed in academic language and have used it for so long that It can be a struggle to see what terms need to be clarified. We need to look for ways to explain, model and highlight academic terms in a straightforward manner. Every game day starts and ends the same way. There is the pre-game stretch and pep talk. During the game there are time outs and half times. After the game there is the review talk, watching films and preparing for the next game. One of our chief goals should be to help students build automaticity in their use of academic thinking skills. Students need to know every time they interact with a text, there is a set plan to follow before, during and after they read.
  • If you noticed from the film, the teacher was in the background. The students were the ones doing the work and the teacher was there to support, encourage and push the students. Let’s take a few minutes to think about what we can learn from good coaches. Coaches lecture while they demonstrate a certain skill. Just standing there using words isn’t going to have the same impact. They waste time and sometimes confuse the students. As expert readers, we must become pros and sharpen our think alouds. We must plan how best to share our academic thinking with students rather than improvising. We need to make the invisible thinking processes visible, not just with reading challenging texts but also how we get stuck, figure out words, ask questions, solve problems, hypothesize and analyze. Football coaches start out pushing a sled, then move on to another play and then add it into a scrimmage. When teaching students how to interact with an academic text, you must break down thinking into more tangible components and practice these with the support of the teacher. Lev Vygotsky’s zone of proximal development suggests a gradual release of responsibility within an authentic, supportive environment. Jeff Zwiers suggests a 30-30-30 scaffolding approach. 30% teacher modeling, 30% cooperative group work and 30% independent work. We all know sports differ in rules, equipment and vocabulary. Dribbling to a basketball coach means bouncing the ball with your hands. However, to a soccer coach, dribbling means kicking the ball with your feet. A strike for a baseball team will mean something different than a strike for a bowling team. As expert readers, we have been immersed in academic language and have used it for so long that It can be a struggle to see what terms need to be clarified. We need to look for ways to explain, model and highlight academic terms in a straightforward manner. Every game day starts and ends the same way. There is the pre-game stretch and pep talk. During the game there are time outs and half times. After the game there is the review talk, watching films and preparing for the next game. One of our chief goals should be to help students build automaticity in their use of academic thinking skills. Students need to know every time they interact with a text, there is a set plan to follow before, during and after they read.
  • Throw candy – when r you more successful? Less stressed? Easier to do? If you want to e nhancing the level of joy in teaching and student learning then you have to simplify the purpose. Give students a chance by focusing on one aspect of the reading. There is a time and place for everything and we try to do it all at once. Most students can’t handle it and they get overwhelmed. There is no good thinking. You are stressed to try to get through it all and the students are stressed because they can’t do it all. Why do we have to keep teaching retelling? Ste priorites and guide thinking, decisions actions
  • Read text silently to suggested stopping point: When student is finished s/he is thinking of his/her response to the intro. Prompts from flip chart:
  • The underlined words can change as you use the prompt frame for different strategies.
  • I can tell everyone is ready for a time out. On a post it note, write down any questions you have to this point about reciprocal teaching.
  • With one sentence you can give the support for reading improvement. Students will know the important information to include in the essay and as a result will be successful in comprehending the passage.
  • Read text silently to suggested stopping point: When student is finished s/he is thinking of his/her response to the intro. Prompts from flip chart:
  • This is an informational text about spit also known as saliva and I want you to summarize the important facts in the text, by looking for what you already know, new information, and interesting facts . Tell me what you learned in one sentence. What did you use to help you make that summary? How does that help you understand the text?
  • Why do you think the author didn’t include this information? What did you already know that helped you clarify the word/idea? How did that help you understand the story better?
  • This is a poem about snow and I want you to ask questions about the character’s actions . Read text silently to suggested stopping point: When student is finished reading, s/he is thinking of her/his response to the intro. Prompts from flip chart: What questions did you ask yourself? What did you use to help you ask that question ? What questions did you ask yourself? How does that help you understand the story/text/passage/selection? Let’s look at our own questions . How did they help us understand the text? Did you find the answer? How?
  • This is called dice discussions. Take turns rolling the die. The number on the die will determine the question you answer. Make sure to refer to the research you brought into class. Take a few minutes to write down what you understand about reading strategies.
  • This is a Fantasy story about a dog trying to live with six cats and I want you to predict the next event in the story, using what you know about dogs and cats . What do you think will happen next?What did you use to help you make that prediction ? Are you confirming or rejecting your prediction? Why? How did predicting help you understand the author’s message?
  • Get them talking. Look for problems and use the problems to guide the mini lessons. Each of you have a number. Your number will guide you to which question you are going to ask your peers. There will be three rounds for getting together to ask and answer each others questions about who you are as a reader. 1 – What do you like to read? 2 – What don’t you like to read? 3 – What positive experiences have you had with reading? 4 – What are the negative experiences you have had with reading?
  • Use theme as foundation for all parts of the conversation.
  • I can tell everyone is ready for a time out. On a post it note, write down any questions you have to this point about reciprocal teaching.
  • This is a narrative book about a boy dressing for the snow and I want you to make a connection by telling a neighbor about something you remember . Did this remind you of an experience? How will that help you understand the story? How could this help you understand the story? What other connections have you had while reading?
  • Intro text: This is an informational selection about skin and I want you to visualize by taking the words and make them into pictures in your head . Read text silently to suggested stopping point: When student is finished reading s/he is thinking of her/his response to the intro. What could you draw to illustrate that idea? What picture did you see in your head? How did your picture change? What words did you use to help you visualize? Let’s look at our own illustrations . How did they help us understand the selection?
  • Transcript of "Julie b. wise capital reading council"

    1. 1. Be the Coach, not the Player! Julie B. Wise twitter.com/readingsecrets [email_address] facebook.com/myreadingsecrets www.myreadingsecrets.com youtube.com/juliebwise
    2. 2. What do coaches do? <ul><li>Coaches model what they want their players to do. </li></ul><ul><li>Coaches engage players in the process of the game. </li></ul><ul><li>Coaches engage players in strategies for that specific sport. </li></ul><ul><li>Coaches do skill and drill but they surround it by the game. </li></ul><ul><li>Topping & McManus, 2002 </li></ul>
    3. 3. What do coaches do? Coaches model what they want their players to do.
    4. 4. What do coaches do? Coaches engage players in the process of the game.
    5. 5. Before you read warm up your brain by While you read use your brain muscles by After your read cool down your brain by Before you read warm up your brain by While you read use your brain muscles by After your read cool down your brain by Before you read warm up your brain by While you read use your brain muscles by After your read cool down your brain by
    6. 6. Coaches engage players in strategies for that specific sport. FOR ONE PURPOSE
    7. 7. Level:_____ Text: _______ Focus: _________________ BEFORE READING (2-3 minutes) DURING READING (8 – 10 minutes) AFTER READING (2 – 3 minutes) Coaches do skill and drill but they surround it by the game. <ul><li>Read silently p. _____ to ______ </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for strategy support: </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for discussion: </li></ul><ul><li>Read silently p. _____ to ______ </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for strategy support: </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for discussion: </li></ul><ul><li>Read silently p. _____ to ______ </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for strategy support: </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for discussion: </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for strategy support: </li></ul><ul><li>Confirm/reject predictions </li></ul><ul><li>Ask/answer questions </li></ul><ul><li>Summarize text </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for metacognition: </li></ul><ul><li>The strategy that helped me the most was _________ because ____ </li></ul><ul><li>____________________________. </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for evaluation: </li></ul><ul><li>I liked/disliked the text… </li></ul><ul><li>I learned … </li></ul><ul><li>The author’s purpose… </li></ul><ul><li>Preview text: </li></ul><ul><li>What do you see? </li></ul><ul><li>What are you reading? </li></ul><ul><li>What do you already know? </li></ul>Introduce text: This is a _____(genre) about _____ _________(topic) and I want you to ________(strategy) by _______ (focus). <ul><li>Predict text: </li></ul><ul><li>I predict the text will be… </li></ul><ul><li>I predict I will learn … </li></ul><ul><li>Question text: </li></ul><ul><li>I wonder… </li></ul>
    8. 8. Predict Question Clarify Connect Visualize Summarize Before I want you to predict the next event in the story, using what you know about dogs and cats . <ul><ul><li>I want you to ask questions about the character’s actions . </li></ul></ul>I want you to clarify words or ideas by adding information the author didn’t include. I want you to make a connection by telling a neighbor about something you remember . I want you to visualize by taking the words and make them into pictures in your head. I want you to summarize the important facts in the text, by looking for what you already know, new information, and interesting facts. During <ul><ul><li>What do you think will happen next? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What did you use to help you make that prediction ? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Are you confirming or rejecting your prediction? Why? </li></ul></ul>What questions did you ask yourself? What did you use to help you ask that question ? Did you find the answer? How? What word/idea did you choose? Why do you think the author didn’t include this information? What did you already know that helped you clarify the word/idea ? Did this remind you of an experience? How will that help you understand the story? What other connections have you had while reading? What could you draw to illustrate that idea? What picture did you see in your head? How did your picture change? What words did you use to help you visualize ? Tell me what you learned in one sentence. What did you use to help you make that summary? What did you summarize? How does that help you understand the text? After How did predicting help you understand the author’s message? <ul><ul><li>How do your questions help you understand the poems better? </li></ul></ul>How did clarifying that word/idea help you understand the story better? <ul><ul><li>How did your connections help you remember the passage ? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Let’s look at our own illustrations . How did they help us understand the selection ? </li></ul></ul>How did summarizing help us understand the text?
    9. 9. Proper Equipment Strategy Engagement Text Predict Sticky Notes/ Highlighter Novel Question Human Paragraph Magazine Clarify Dice Discussion Poetry Connect Scatter/Think Marks Lyrics Visualize MAC Attack Textbook Infer Foldables/Four Door Comics Summarize Gallery Walk Picture book
    10. 10. Inferring Lesson Plan <ul><li>Intro text: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>This is a Realistic Comic Strip about how a family is planning to spend a rainy day and I want you to infer what each person is thinking by looking at their thoughts . </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Read text silently to suggested stopping point </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>When student is finished reading s/he is thinking of her/his response to the intro. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Prompts from chart: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What can you infer from this picture? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What did you use to help you make that inference? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Finish reading the selection: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What in the picture makes you think that? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Discuss prompt and reflection: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Let’s look at our own inferences . How did they help us understand this comic strip? </li></ul></ul>
    11. 12. Why would you want spit in your mouth? 1. 2. 3. 1 2 3 In the text In your head Using at least three examples from the passage, identify ways spit is helpful. Because, as a result, therefore
    12. 13. Before you read warm up your brain by Text Walk Spit Information While you read use your brain muscles by Identifying how spit is helpful and writing the idea on three sticky notes After your read cool down your brain by Write a paragraph about the three ways spit is helpful.
    13. 14. Level: Fifth Text: What’s Spit Focus: Summarizing strategy BEFORE READING (2-3 minutes) DURING READING (8 – 10 minutes) AFTER READING (2 – 3 minutes) Summarizing Lesson Plan <ul><li>Read silently p. _____ to ______ </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for strategy support: </li></ul><ul><li>Tell me what you learned in one sentence. </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for discussion: </li></ul><ul><li>What did you use to help you make that summary? </li></ul><ul><li>Read silently p. _____ to ______ </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for strategy support: </li></ul><ul><li>What can we summarize? </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for discussion: </li></ul><ul><li>How does that help you understand the text? </li></ul><ul><li>Read silently p. _____ to ______ </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for strategy support: </li></ul><ul><li>Tell me what you learned in one sentence. </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for discussion: </li></ul><ul><li>Let’s look at our own summaries. </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for strategy support: </li></ul><ul><li>Confirm/reject predictions </li></ul><ul><li>Ask/answer questions </li></ul><ul><li>Summarize text </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for metacognition: </li></ul><ul><li>The strategy that helped me the most was _________ because ____ </li></ul><ul><li>____________________________. </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for evaluation: </li></ul><ul><li>I liked/disliked the text… </li></ul><ul><li>I learned … </li></ul><ul><li>The author’s purpose… </li></ul><ul><li>Preview text: </li></ul><ul><li>What do you see? </li></ul><ul><li>What are you reading? </li></ul><ul><li>What do you already know? </li></ul>Introduce text: This is an informational text about spit also known as saliva and I want you to summarize the important facts in the text, by looking for what you already know, new information, and interesting facts . <ul><li>Predict text: </li></ul><ul><li>I predict the text will be… </li></ul><ul><li>I predict I will learn … </li></ul><ul><li>Question text: </li></ul><ul><li>I wonder… </li></ul>
    14. 15. What’s Spit? Pull a lollipop out of your mouth and you’ll see it. Wake up after drooling on your pillow and you’ll feel it. That’s right, it’s spit, also know as saliva. Saliva is a clear liquid that’s made in your mouth 24 hours a day, every day. It’s made up mostly of water, with a few other chemicals. The slippery stuff is produced by the salivary glands. These glands are found on the inside of each cheek, on the bottom of the mouth, and under the jaw at the very front of the mouth. They secrete, or ooze, about 2 to 4 pints of spit into your mouth every day! Spit is super for lots of reasons. Saliva wets food and makes it easier to swallow. Without saliva, a grilled cheese sandwich would be dry and difficult to gulp down. It also helps the tongue by allowing you to taste. A dry tongue can’t tell how things taste – it needs saliva to keep it wet. Spit helps begin the process of digestion too. Before food hits your stomach, saliva starts to break it down while the food’s still in your mouth. It does this with the help of enzymes, special chemicals found in the saliva. Breaking down the food this way makes the tongue’s job a bit easier – it can push wet, chewed food toward the throat more easily. Saliva also cleans the inside of your mouth and rinses your teeth to help keep them clean. (But remember that spit isn’t enough to keep teeth in tip-top shape; you still need to brush and floss!) The enzymes in saliva also help to fight off infections in the mouth. Most school-age kids have just the right amount of saliva. Sometimes a person may not have enough saliva, but this is usually the result of certain medicines or treatments, some kinds of diseases, or old age. www.kidshealth.org
    15. 16. Clarifying Lesson Plan Level:Second Text: Owl Moon Focus: Clarifying strategy BEFORE READING (2-3 minutes) DURING READING (8 – 10 minutes) AFTER READING (2 – 3 minutes) <ul><li>Read silently p. 1 </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for strategy support: </li></ul><ul><li>What word/idea did you choose? </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for discussion: </li></ul><ul><li>Why do you think the author didn’t include this information? </li></ul><ul><li>Read silently p. 2 </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for strategy support: </li></ul><ul><li>What word/idea did you choose? </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for discussion: </li></ul><ul><li>What did you already know that helped you clarify the word/idea? </li></ul><ul><li>Read silently p3 </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for strategy support: </li></ul><ul><li>What word/idea did you choose? </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for discussion: </li></ul><ul><li>How did that help you understand the story better? </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for strategy support: </li></ul><ul><li>Confirm/reject predictions </li></ul><ul><li>Ask/answer questions </li></ul><ul><li>Summarize text </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for metacognition: </li></ul><ul><li>The strategy that helped me the most was _________ because ____ </li></ul><ul><li>____________________________. </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for evaluation: </li></ul><ul><li>I liked/disliked the text… </li></ul><ul><li>I learned … </li></ul><ul><li>The author’s purpose… </li></ul><ul><li>Preview text: </li></ul><ul><li>What do you see? </li></ul><ul><li>What are you reading? </li></ul><ul><li>What do you already know? </li></ul>Introduce text: This is a realistic fiction text about a father and daughter hunting owls and I want you to clarify words or ideas by adding information the author didn’t include. <ul><li>Predict text: </li></ul><ul><li>I predict the text will be… </li></ul><ul><li>I predict I will learn … </li></ul><ul><li>Question text: </li></ul><ul><li>I wonder… </li></ul>
    16. 17. Before you read warm up your brain by Picture Walk Owl Hunting Information Winter While you read use your brain muscles by Reading slowly to highlight the words/ideas that need more information. After your read cool down your brain by Add words to personal word wall.
    17. 18. Owl Moon by Jane Yolen I could hear it through the woolen cap Pa had pulled down over my ears. A farm dog answered the train and then a second dog joined in. They sang out, trains and dogs, for a real long time. And when their voices faded away it was as quiet as a dream. We walked on toward the woods, Pa and I. I chose the word “it” because I don’t know what she is hearing. I will have to read on to clarify the author’s meaning. I chose the idea, “dog answered the train” because I don’t think the dog is really talking to the train. I can clarify the author’s meaning using my prior knowledge because I know dogs bark back at a loud sound. I chose the idea, “they sang out,” because I don’t think they are really singing. I can clarify the author’s meaning using my prior knowledge because it’s more interesting to say “sang out” instead of “they were noisy for a long time.” I chose the idea, “as quiet as a dream,” because I wanted to stop and think about how quiet it is when I am dreaming.
    18. 19. Questioning Lesson Plan Level: Fourth Text: New Year Snowbird Focus: Questioning strategy BEFORE READING (2-3 minutes) DURING READING (8 – 10 minutes) AFTER READING (2 – 3 minutes) <ul><li>Read silently 1 st stanza </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for strategy support: </li></ul><ul><li>What questions did you ask yourself? </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for discussion: </li></ul><ul><li>What does the speaker compare glistening boots to in? </li></ul><ul><li>Read silently 2 stanza </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for strategy support: </li></ul><ul><li>What did you use to help you ask that question ? </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for discussion: </li></ul><ul><li>Which phrase is an example of alliteration? </li></ul><ul><li>Read silently 2 nd poem </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for strategy support: </li></ul><ul><li>What questions did you ask yourself? </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for discussion: </li></ul><ul><li>How did they help you understand the poem better? </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for strategy support: </li></ul><ul><li>Confirm/reject predictions </li></ul><ul><li>Ask/answer questions </li></ul><ul><li>Summarize text </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for metacognition: </li></ul><ul><li>The strategy that helped me the most was _________ because ____ </li></ul><ul><li>____________________________. </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for evaluation: </li></ul><ul><li>I liked/disliked the text… </li></ul><ul><li>I learned … </li></ul><ul><li>The author’s purpose… </li></ul><ul><li>Preview text: </li></ul><ul><li>What do you see? </li></ul><ul><li>What are you reading? </li></ul><ul><li>What do you already know? </li></ul>Introduce text: This is a poem about snow and I want you to ask questions about the character’s actions . <ul><li>Predict text: </li></ul><ul><li>I predict the text will be… </li></ul><ul><li>I predict I will learn … </li></ul><ul><li>Question text: </li></ul><ul><li>I wonder… </li></ul>
    19. 20. New Year Snowbird by Christine Boyka Kluge In the night, in the snow, on the swings, my glistening boots become wings I fly through the shadows waiting to pounce on the porch light where tiny snowflakes bounce like confetti Are you ready? My whistling wings pull me up and up The snow becomes faraway stars on my toes When I jump toward the light I close my eyes tight and let the stars tickle my nose When All the World Is Full of Snow by N. M. Bodecker I never know just where to go, when all the world is full of snow. I do not want to make a track, not even to the shed and back. I only want to watch and wait, while snow moths settle on the gate, and swarming frost flakes fill the trees with billions of albino* bees. I only want myself to be as silent as a winter tree, to hear the swirling stillness grow, when all the world is full of snow. *albino — white Which word best describes how the speakers in both poems feel when it is snowing outside? What do the speakers of both poems have in common?
    20. 21. Dice Discussion Who What When/Where Why How Which
    21. 22. Predicting Lesson Plan Level: First Text: Widget Focus: Predicting strategy BEFORE READING (2-3 minutes) DURING READING (8 – 10 minutes) AFTER READING (2 – 3 minutes) <ul><li>Read silently p. </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for strategy support: </li></ul><ul><li>What do you think will happen next? </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for discussion: </li></ul><ul><li>What did you use to help you make that prediction ? </li></ul><ul><li>Read silently p. </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for strategy support: </li></ul><ul><li>Are you confirming or rejecting your prediction? Why? </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for discussion: </li></ul><ul><li>What did you already know that helped you make that prediction? </li></ul><ul><li>Read silently p. </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for strategy support: </li></ul><ul><li>What do you think will happen next? </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for discussion: </li></ul><ul><li>How did predicting help you understand the author’s message? </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for strategy support: </li></ul><ul><li>Confirm/reject predictions </li></ul><ul><li>Ask/answer questions </li></ul><ul><li>Summarize text </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for metacognition: </li></ul><ul><li>The strategy that helped me the most was _________ because ____ </li></ul><ul><li>____________________________. </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for evaluation: </li></ul><ul><li>I liked/disliked the text… </li></ul><ul><li>I learned … </li></ul><ul><li>The author’s purpose… </li></ul><ul><li>Preview text: </li></ul><ul><li>What do you see? </li></ul><ul><li>What are you reading? </li></ul><ul><li>What do you already know? </li></ul>Introduce text: This is a Fantasy story about a dog trying to live with six cats and I want you to predict the next event in the story, using what you know about dogs and cats . <ul><li>Predict text: </li></ul><ul><li>I predict the text will be… </li></ul><ul><li>I predict I will learn … </li></ul><ul><li>Question text: </li></ul><ul><li>I wonder… </li></ul>
    22. 23. 1 2 4 3 1 – Who was your favorite character.?Why? 2 – Who was your least favorite character? Why? 3 – Could there be characters like this in real life? 4 – When you look at these characters, what can you learn about yourself? Round 1: 1&2, 3&4 Round 2: 2&3, 1&4 Round 3: 1&3, 2&4 Theme: How we relate to each other Others may help us, but we must figure out who we really are on our own.
    23. 24. Theme: How we relate to each other Others may help us, but we must figure out who we really are on our own. Genre Elements Character Setting Plot Theme Reading Strategies Predicting Making Connections Questions Author’s craft Leads/endings Imagery Sentence Structure Mood
    24. 25. Glow: What is one aspect of your teaching that can be validated? Grow: What is one aspect of your teaching you now realize needs to be adjusted?
    25. 26. Make Connections Lesson Plan Level: Third Text: Thomas’s Snowsuit Focus: Make Connection BEFORE READING (2-3 minutes) DURING READING (8 – 10 minutes) AFTER READING (2 – 3 minutes) <ul><li>Read silently p. 1 to 4 </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for strategy support: </li></ul><ul><li>Did this remind you of an experience? </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for discussion: </li></ul><ul><li>How will that help you understand the story? </li></ul><ul><li>Read silently p. 5 to 10 </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for strategy support: </li></ul><ul><li>What other connections have you had while reading? </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for discussion: </li></ul><ul><li>How could this help you understand the story? </li></ul><ul><li>Read silently p. 11 to 20 </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for strategy support: </li></ul><ul><li>Did this remind you of an experience? </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for discussion: </li></ul><ul><li>How did they help you understand the story? </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for strategy support: </li></ul><ul><li>Confirm/reject predictions </li></ul><ul><li>Ask/answer questions </li></ul><ul><li>Summarize text </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for metacognition: </li></ul><ul><li>The strategy that helped me the most was _________ because ____ </li></ul><ul><li>____________________________. </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for evaluation: </li></ul><ul><li>I liked/disliked the text… </li></ul><ul><li>I learned … </li></ul><ul><li>The author’s purpose… </li></ul><ul><li>Preview text: </li></ul><ul><li>What do you see? </li></ul><ul><li>What are you reading? </li></ul><ul><li>What do you already know? </li></ul>Introduce text: This is a narrative book about a boy dressing for the snow and I want you to make a connection by telling a neighbor about something you remember . <ul><li>Predict text: </li></ul><ul><li>I predict the text will be… </li></ul><ul><li>I predict I will learn … </li></ul><ul><li>Question text: </li></ul><ul><li>I wonder… </li></ul>
    26. 27. Visualize Lesson Plan Level: Second Text: Perfect Container Focus: Visualize Strategy BEFORE READING (2-3 minutes) DURING READING (8 – 10 minutes) AFTER READING (2 – 3 minutes) <ul><li>Read silently p. to </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for strategy support: </li></ul><ul><li>What could you draw to illustrate that idea? </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for discussion: </li></ul><ul><li>How will that help you understand the selection? </li></ul><ul><li>Read silently p. to </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for strategy support: </li></ul><ul><li>What picture did you see in your head? </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for discussion: </li></ul><ul><li>How did your picture change? </li></ul><ul><li>Read silently p. to </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for strategy support: </li></ul><ul><li>What words did you use to help you visualize? </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for discussion: </li></ul><ul><li>How did they help you understand the selection? </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for strategy support: </li></ul><ul><li>Confirm/reject predictions </li></ul><ul><li>Ask/answer questions </li></ul><ul><li>Summarize text </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for metacognition: </li></ul><ul><li>The strategy that helped me the most was _________ because ____ </li></ul><ul><li>____________________________. </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt for evaluation: </li></ul><ul><li>I liked/disliked the text… </li></ul><ul><li>I learned … </li></ul><ul><li>The author’s purpose… </li></ul><ul><li>Preview text: </li></ul><ul><li>What do you see? </li></ul><ul><li>What are you reading? </li></ul><ul><li>What do you already know? </li></ul>Introduce text: This is an informational selection about skin and I want you to visualize by taking the words and make them into pictures in your head . <ul><li>Predict text: </li></ul><ul><li>I predict the text will be… </li></ul><ul><li>I predict I will learn … </li></ul><ul><li>Question text: </li></ul><ul><li>I wonder… </li></ul>
    27. 29. Think marks Genre Elements Character Setting Plot Theme Reading Strategies Predicting Making Connections Questions Author’s craft Leads/endings Imagery Sentence Structure Mood
    28. 30. Think marks Genre Elements Author’s Purpose Main Idea Supporting Details Vocabulary Reading Strategies Making Connections Questions Summarizing Author’s craft Leads/endings Point of View Evidence(Fact/Opinion) Bias
    29. 31. Think marks Genre Elements Emotion Sensory Images Music Theme Reading Strategies Clarify Make Connections Questions Author’s craft Rhyme (snow/slow) Rhythm (beats) Figurative Language (simile, metaphor) Language Patterns (alliteration) Repetition
    30. 32. <ul><li>Topics for theme: </li></ul><ul><li>Childhood race relations self-improvement trust death </li></ul><ul><li>Courage dreams family prejudice freedom </li></ul><ul><li>Equality imagination loneliness friendship independence </li></ul><ul><li>Revenge suffering understanding growing up violence </li></ul><ul><li>Desire faith fears love war </li></ul><ul><li>Universal themes: </li></ul><ul><li>How we relate to each other: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Family is more important than popularity, wealth, etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sometimes we must go against what everyone else is doing and make our own path. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A true friendship can withstand tests. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fighting doesn’t solve problems. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Others may help us, but we must figure out who we really are on our own. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>People who don’t believe everyone is created equal can often act unfairly and sometimes can be dangerous. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>How we relate to nature: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>It is difficult for people from today’s modern age to survive in the natural world. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Nature is a healing force. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>People are destroying nature and humanity with uncontrolled technology. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Good can come from bad. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Persistence and effort pay off in the end. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cheaters never win. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Honesty is the best polity </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Growing up: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Growing up requires a person to make many difficult choices. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Growing up is confusing. The Reading Handbook </li></ul></ul>
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