<ul><li>Kelsey </li></ul><ul><li>Jymlise  </li></ul><ul><li>Tanquasia </li></ul><ul><li>Tayyiba </li></ul><ul><li>Austin <...
5 minute quiz <ul><li>Tell me what each letter in the FLIRT acronym stands for. I will show you the motions in a different...
Mental and Physical Behaviors Physical “ read ” Mental “ mind ” F I preview the text to determine the genre demands and es...
Before you read, FLIRT with the text. FLIRT Find the form Look at text features Identify connections Reveal the purpose Tr...
Please pick up a few things for me at the grocery store. Chips Broccoli Oranges M&Ms Bananas Sugar Bread Tomatoes Flour Le...
Please pick up a few things for me at the grocery store. Fruits Bananas Oranges Grapes Veggies Lettuce Broccoli Tomatoes B...
Please pick up a few things for me at the grocery store, I am making  dessert. Fruits Bananas Oranges Grapes Veggies Lettu...
Please pick up a few things for me at the grocery store, I am making a  cake . Here is the  recipe : Fruits Bananas Orange...
Recipe for Reading Highlight signal words in text features Identify foundation : Based on time Based on describing Identif...
Enumeration Description Compare/ Contrast Sequence Cause/ Effect Problem/ Solution Author’s Purpose To list or identify fa...
Describe Time
 
SURVEY SAYS… One problem to resolve in crocodile watching is transportation. Time – Problem/Solution
SURVEY SAYS… We observed the crocodile as it stalked a raccoon…As a result of the noise we made, the raccoon bolted… Time ...
SURVEY SAYS… The power of the crocodile is like that of a monstrous machine. With one lunge it can…Compared to the alligat...
SURVEY SAYS… The crocodile mostly feed on vertebrates like fish, reptiles, and mammals, sometimes with invertebrates like ...
SURVEY SAYS… Crocodiles are very fast over short distances, even out of water. They have extremely powerful jaws capable o...
How does knowing the text structure  BEFORE  reading help you locate important information?
  F.L.I.R.T. This is a:  about:  I already know…   I’m curious about…  The author wants me to: Read and Organize Write Thi...
Read and Organize   F.L.I.R.T. This is a/an:  about:  I already know…  The author wants me to: So the process will be… Wri...
  Sedimentary Rocks In most places on the surface, the igneous rocks which make up the majority of the crust are covered b...
  Time-honored cookie recipes tend to manipulate flour and fat in special ways to produce the tender, rich textures that a...
Text Structures Monitoring what’s important to the author Find someone who can define text structure. Find someone who can...
F.L.I.R.T. This is a:  about:  I already know…   I’m curious about…  The author wants me to: Read and Organize Write This ...
FLIRT with Writing <ul><li>Trace the history of the treatment of mental illness. </li></ul><ul><li>Contrast the health-car...
Check this out… Are Humans and Neanderthal Linked?   - 16-Jan-2006 Scientists believe that early humans known as Neanderth...
Are Humans and Neanderthal Linked?   - 16-Jan-2007 Neanderthal vs. Homo sapiens Scientists believe that early  humans  kno...
Metacognition Log Date I already know… I now know… Comments What was easy about identifying the text structure for each se...
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  • When you know the physical and mental steps you need to take for every step in the FLIRT process, the process becomes easy. When things are easy, they are fun and when reading is fun, you are willing to get it done.
  • Flirt – get interested When you started to flirt, you need a clear purpose, are you looking for a friend, someone to date, to make yourself feel good? When you read, you can’t just say, I am going to read to read. You have to be clear on your purpose and your direction. You have to go in to win, don’t go in to finish.
  • You don’t know what’s important until you read the recipe.
  • Use this think mark anytime you begin reading to remind yourself of ROW. If you read with passion, interest and motivation to learn and you will stay focused and have fun.
  • Survey says keeps all students involved and gives you immediate feedback.
  • These are the specific text structures for each type.
  • In terms of modeling, it is important to remember that students need examples of the type of thinking required of a task before being asked to complete the task with peers or independently. I am going to FLIRT with the text and figure out what the author wants me to learn.
  • In terms of modeling, it is important to remember that students need examples of the teype of thinking requried of a task before being aske to complete the task with peers or independently. I am going to FLIRT with the text and figure out what the author wants me to learn.
  • In terms of modeling, it is important to remember that students need examples of the teype of thinking requried of a task before being aske to complete the task with peers or independently. I am going to FLIRT with the text and figure out what the author wants me to learn.
  • Here is a check list for you to use while you compare a textbook to real life reading material. What did you find? How can you transfer the same motivation and reading strategies students use with real life reading to a textbook? Right now would be a great time to ask your students to reflect on their learning from your class. What did they learn that they already know they will use in real life. What learning did they do that they don’t see a purpose. Use this information this summer to start to build a collection of real life reasons that you can weave into your content next year.
  • Call one person from each team up to the staples “Easy” button. Ask a question about text structures. The first person to press the button…
  • FLIRT to determine what information is important to the author.
  • 11 lled 12 text structure

    1. 1. <ul><li>Kelsey </li></ul><ul><li>Jymlise </li></ul><ul><li>Tanquasia </li></ul><ul><li>Tayyiba </li></ul><ul><li>Austin </li></ul><ul><li>Willie </li></ul>
    2. 2. 5 minute quiz <ul><li>Tell me what each letter in the FLIRT acronym stands for. I will show you the motions in a different order: </li></ul><ul><li>1. </li></ul><ul><li>2. </li></ul><ul><li>3. </li></ul><ul><li>4. </li></ul><ul><li>5. </li></ul>
    3. 3. Mental and Physical Behaviors Physical “ read ” Mental “ mind ” F I preview the text to determine the genre demands and establish my reading behaviors. L I skim the text features to create interest and identify essential themes. I I make connections to determine what I already know about the topic and identify difficult sections. R I ask questions to set a purpose and to anticipate the author’s point of view. T I scan for transition words to determine the external text structure and establish a system for organizing new information.
    4. 4. Before you read, FLIRT with the text. FLIRT Find the form Look at text features Identify connections Reveal the purpose Transfer to organizer F Fiction, nonfiction and poetry genres place different demands on a reader’s mental behaviors . L Look at text features The author uses text features to advertise important information, alert you to new vocabulary words and provide visuals to help your mind stay focused and interested in the text. I Identify connections useful information to help make meaningful connections between my mind and the author’s message. T Text structure helps you monitor what information is important to the author . R Reveal the purpose for reading to help your mind stay focused, organized and locate the most important information.
    5. 5. Please pick up a few things for me at the grocery store. Chips Broccoli Oranges M&Ms Bananas Sugar Bread Tomatoes Flour Lettuce Eggs Grapes Bagels Milk Chicken Vanilla Butter Baking Soda Yogurt Nuggets Pork Salt
    6. 6. Please pick up a few things for me at the grocery store. Fruits Bananas Oranges Grapes Veggies Lettuce Broccoli Tomatoes Bread Bagels Bread Flour Dairy Milk Butter Yogurt Protein Chicken Nuggets Eggs Fats Sugar Chips M&Ms Other Vanilla Baking Soda Salt
    7. 7. Please pick up a few things for me at the grocery store, I am making dessert. Fruits Bananas Oranges Grapes Veggies Lettuce Broccoli Tomatoes Bread Bagels Bread Flour Dairy Milk Butter Yogurt Protein Chicken Nuggets Pork Fats Sugar Chips M&Ms Other Vanilla Baking Soda Salt
    8. 8. Please pick up a few things for me at the grocery store, I am making a cake . Here is the recipe : Fruits Bananas Oranges Grapes Veggies Lettuce Broccoli Tomatoes Bread Bagels Bread Flour Dairy Milk Butter Yogurt Protein Chicken Nuggets Pork Fats Sugar Chips M&Ms Other Vanilla Baking Soda Salt Cream butter and sugar . Add eggs and vanilla . Mix flour, salt and baking soda . Slowly add to wet mixture. Pour into greased pan and bake at 350.
    9. 9. Recipe for Reading Highlight signal words in text features Identify foundation : Based on time Based on describing Identify text structure: Enumeration Description Compare/Contrast Sequence Cause/Effect Problem/Solution Read and highlight Organize notes Write/draw a summary Recipe for Reading Describe Time
    10. 10. Enumeration Description Compare/ Contrast Sequence Cause/ Effect Problem/ Solution Author’s Purpose To list or identify facts, parts, or categories in any order To give information about a topic, person or an animal. To point out how two topics are the same and/or different. To tell about a specific order of events or steps in a process. To explain why or how something happened. To describe a problem and what was done to solve it. Topic Focus Several categories Types Size Some characteristics Most important Similarly Alike Difference On (date) On (time) Order Because Since Consequently The problem What happens Why does Transition Words In addition Another For instance Also For example For instance Such as However On the other hand As well as Unlike Next After Finally First The effect This led to Therefore One challenge A difficulty Having solved Task Words List Define Discuss Describe Illustrate Compare Contrast Prove Summarize Discuss Trace Justify Explain Illustrate Evaluate Criticize Prove Graphic Organizers
    11. 11. Describe Time
    12. 13. SURVEY SAYS… One problem to resolve in crocodile watching is transportation. Time – Problem/Solution
    13. 14. SURVEY SAYS… We observed the crocodile as it stalked a raccoon…As a result of the noise we made, the raccoon bolted… Time – Cause/Effect
    14. 15. SURVEY SAYS… The power of the crocodile is like that of a monstrous machine. With one lunge it can…Compared to the alligator the crocodile… Description – Compare/Contrast
    15. 16. SURVEY SAYS… The crocodile mostly feed on vertebrates like fish, reptiles, and mammals, sometimes with invertebrates like mollusks and crustaceans, depending on species. . Description - Enumeration
    16. 17. SURVEY SAYS… Crocodiles are very fast over short distances, even out of water. They have extremely powerful jaws capable of biting down with immense force, by far the strongest bite of any animal. Description - Describe
    17. 18. How does knowing the text structure BEFORE reading help you locate important information?
    18. 19.   F.L.I.R.T. This is a: about:  I already know…   I’m curious about…  The author wants me to: Read and Organize Write This passage was about: The Fire Escape by Michelle Chen Heat hung like damp stockings over the taut wire of the neighborhood upon which we balanced and let the heaving warmth drop into our lungs. Long, dewy limbs propped against the grainy edge of a building’s roof, scorched tarpaper sanding down the edges of the sun. Surfaces turned to bisque in the blurry air of this fiery kiln, our grandmothers below feeding pigeons beneath the cheap shade of nylon umbrellas. You, looking for a soda, me, watching boys on bicycles, rubber wheels broiling on crumbling asphalt. It was too hot to speak, so we watched the radiant city, like watching a cake rise, from the fire escape. 8 th grade PSSA Explain how the title of the poem has more than one meaning. Use at least three examples from the poem in your explanation.
    19. 20. Read and Organize   F.L.I.R.T. This is a/an: about:  I already know…  The author wants me to: So the process will be… Write The answer is… A.2.1.1 1. Simplify: 8 • 3² + 7 • (6 - 4) A 62 B 86 C 110 D 590 www.pde.state.pa.us
    20. 21.   Sedimentary Rocks In most places on the surface, the igneous rocks which make up the majority of the crust are covered by a thin veneer of loose sediment, and the rock which is made as layers of this debris get compacted and cemented together. Sedimentary rocks are called secondary, because they are often the result of the accumulation of small pieces broken off of pre-existing rocks. There are three main types of sedimentary rocks: Clastic : your basic sedimentary rock. Clastic sedimentary rocks are accumulations of clasts: little pieces of broken up rock which have piled up and been &quot;lithified&quot; by compaction and cementation. Chemical : many of these form when standing water evaporates, leaving dissolved minerals behind. These are very common in arid lands, where seasonal &quot;playa lakes&quot; occur in closed depressions. Thick deposits of salt and gypsum can form due to repeated flooding and evaporation over long periods of time. Organic : any accumulation of sedimentary debris caused by organic processes. Many animals use calcium for shells, bones, and teeth. These bits of calcium can pile up on the seafloor and accumulate into a thick enough layer to form an &quot;organic&quot; sedimentary rock. F.L.I.R.T. This is a: about:  I already know…   I’m curious about…  The author wants me to: Read and Organize Write This passage was about:
    21. 22.   Time-honored cookie recipes tend to manipulate flour and fat in special ways to produce the tender, rich textures that are often the mark of special holiday fare. We call this manipulation &quot;building frameworks.&quot; In talking about frameworks, let's begin with flour, because all baking needs a structure to hold the dough together. The most common framework for cookies comes from wheat flour. In particular, two of flour's proteins form gluten when flour is moistened and mixed. Gluten resembles a mesh that gives the framework strength, while the starches in flour swell with moisture, then set in the oven, reinforcing the network. See how gluten forms and how mixing influences its strength in the Bread section. Once you know how gluten works, however, don't be fooled into assuming you only need to consider gluten's influence with breads. In contrast to maximizing gluten development in yeast breads, festive cookies often require a framework in which gluten development is deliberately minimized. So how do you handle flour to make a more delicate framework? Some recipes call for pastry or cake flours, which are wheat flours with lower protein contents so they have less potential to form gluten. Others call for a mixture of wheat flour and specialty flours made from grains that don't contain gluten-forming proteins. For instance, rice flour or cornstarch in shortbread recipes helps keep the dough tender, despite the fact that shortbread requires considerable mixing. Another characteristic of many special cookies is their richness, which is usually associated with using a high proportion of fat (often butter). Calories aside, fats are major tenderizers because they physically interrupt the formation of gluten. So perhaps it's not surprising that many holiday cookies seem to melt in your mouth! Fat is also a fine carrier of flavors because it absorbs the flavors of other ingredients and holds them inside the dough, so fewer essential oils and essences evaporate during baking. Think of the pungency and aroma of cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice, and cloves. Holiday baking often uses exotic spices and flavorings with liberal abandon. As a final hint, read your recipe through carefully before beginning. Think about which ingredients are building structure and which act as tenderizers. And if your recipe isn't high in fat, remember that the more you work the dough, the more the gluten develops and the stronger and less tender its framework becomes. Of course there's much more to cookies than simply their framework. But as is the case with putting most things together, the framework comes first! F.L.I.R.T. This is a: about:  I already know…   I’m curious about…  The author wants me to: Read and Organize Write This passage was about:
    22. 23. Text Structures Monitoring what’s important to the author Find someone who can define text structure. Find someone who can list at least five different types of text structures. Find someone who can explain why text structures are helpful to the author and reader. Find someone who can give a real life example of a problem and solution. Find someone who can explain the difference between descriptive and sequential writing. Find someone who can give a real life example of a cause and effect. Find someone who can give a real life example of compare and contrast. Find someone who can give a real life example of listing items in a category. Find someone who can give a real life example of sequencing.
    23. 24. F.L.I.R.T. This is a: about:  I already know…   I’m curious about…  The author wants me to: Read and Organize Write This passage was about: The artists Mark Rothko and Barnett Newman are considered Abstract Expressionists. Compare two of their large, abstract, colorful canvases.
    24. 25. FLIRT with Writing <ul><li>Trace the history of the treatment of mental illness. </li></ul><ul><li>Contrast the health-care systems in the United States with those in England. </li></ul><ul><li>Define thermal pollution and include several examples. </li></ul><ul><li>State Boyle’s law and illustrate its use. </li></ul><ul><li>Describe the experimentation that test whether plants are sensitive to music. </li></ul>FLIRT This is a: about:  I already know…   Interesting points are…  The author wants me to: DRIVE RELAX
    25. 26. Check this out… Are Humans and Neanderthal Linked? - 16-Jan-2006 Scientists believe that early humans known as Neanderthals were on the earth at the same time as people of our species, Homo sapiens. Researchers have debated for a long time whether the two groups actually mixed together. Neanderthals were shorter than today's humans. They had sloping foreheads and inhabited Europe and the Near East. Neanderthals became extinct about 30,000 years ago. Meanwhile, Homo sapiens took over. Erik Trinkaus of Washington University in St. Louis and Joao Zilhao of the University of Bristol, England co-authored a paper about the findings. Skull Raises Questions The skull was found in Pestera cu Oase, or the Cave with Bones, in southwestern Romania in 2004 and 2005. A test called radiocarbon dating indicates it is at least 35,000 years old and may be more than 40,000 years old! Researchers say the skull had the same proportions as a modern human head and lacked the large brow ridge associated with Neanderthals. There are also features that are unusual in modern humans, such as frontal flattening and a fairly large bone behind the ear. The skull also has exceptionally large upper molars, which are seen among Neanderthals and other early hominid species. ''Such differences raise important questions about the evolutionary history of modern humans,'' said Zilhao. The skull's characteristics could mean a mixture of populations or it could be a case in which ancient traits reappear in a modern human, Zilhao said. It could also mean that science hasn't been able to study enough early modern people to understand their differences. www.timeforkids.com
    26. 27. Are Humans and Neanderthal Linked? - 16-Jan-2007 Neanderthal vs. Homo sapiens Scientists believe that early humans known as Neanderthals were on the earth at the same time as people of our species, Homo sapiens . Researchers have debated for a long time whether the two groups actually mixed together. Neanderthals were shorter than today's humans . They had sloping foreheads and inhabited Europe and the Near East. Neanderthals became extinct about 30,000 years ago. Meanwhile, Homo sapiens took over. Erik Trinkaus of Washington University in St. Louis and Joao Zilhao of the University of Bristol, England co-authored a paper about the findings. www.timeforkids.com
    27. 28. Metacognition Log Date I already know… I now know… Comments What was easy about identifying the text structure for each section of your text?

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