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  • 1. Based on information from the book The Power of Pull:
    How Smart Moves, Smartly Made, Can Set Big Things in Motion
    Presented by: Julie Bollinger
    Hagel III, J., Brown, J. S., & Davison, L. (2010). The power of pull: How small moves, smartly made, can set big things in motion. New York: Basic Books.
  • 2. Most current work environments PUSH out creativity and talent. While most work environments do not intend to do this or even realize it is happening, it is. The result is a very rigid and restrictive work environment that unfortunately causes employees to lose their excitement about their work.
    Hagel III, J., Brown, J. S., & Davison, L. (2010). The power of pull: How small moves, smartly made, can set big things in motion. New York: Basic Books.
  • 3. This means our work environments would welcome employees’ creativity and various talents. The authors of The Power of Pull (Hagel III, Brown, & Davison, 2010) refer to the “power that PULL gives to individuals…as employees” because it “recognizes that unleashing the creative talent that resides, largely untapped, in all individuals will be the primary source of corporate profitability in the digital age” (p. 25).
    For us as educators “profitability” is preparing our students to the best of our abilities for the future.
    Hagel III, J., Brown, J. S., & Davison, L. (2010). The power of pull: How small moves, smartly made, can set big things in motion. New York: Basic Books.
  • 4. Currently at snyder isd we have the push mentality…we need to change this
    A little more about PUSH to help you see what I mean and distinguish the difference between it and PULL which is what we want to move toward.
    Most of us have lived with the PUSH mentality all of our lives. (Hagel III, et al., 2010)
    Assumes “that it is possible to forecast or anticipate demand”(p. 34)
    “Typified by what might be called ‘programs’ or ‘routines’” (p. 34)
    “Represents a top-down approach to dictating activities” (p. 35)
    “Restricted in terms of the number and diversity of participants” (p. 35)
    “Rigid and inflexible” (p. 35)
    “Tend to treat all relevant resources as fixed and scarce quantities” (p. 35)
    In this system “there is a hierarchy, with those in charge offering rewards (or punishments) to those lower down the ladder” (p. 36)
    “People participating in push programs are generally treated as instruments to ensure that activities are performed as dictated” (p. 36)
    “Leads to a curious combination of boredom and stress among participants” because they “are performing repetitive, tightly scripted roles, and they must suppress much of their natural curiosity and individuality” (p. 36)
    Hagel III, J., Brown, J. S., & Davison, L. (2010). The power of pull: How small moves, smartly made, can set big things in motion. New York: Basic Books.
  • 5. The need to move from push to pull is Because of the rapidly changing world
    The following is the description from The Power of Pull (HagelIII, et al., 2010) as to how educational systems are handling the changing world.
    “Our educational institutions are grappling with the need to move from being institutions of learning to learning institutions that rapidly evolve in response to the quickly changing learning needs of students and that find ways to extend the learning process well beyond the walls and semesters that define courses today” (p. 33).
    Thus, the necessity for PULL.
    Hagel III, J., Brown, J. S., & Davison, L. (2010). The power of pull: How small moves, smartly made, can set big things in motion. New York: Basic Books.
  • 6. NOW THAT WE UNDERSTAND ABOUT PUSH, WE NEED TO KNOWMORE ABOUT PULL IN ORDER TO start making changes
    “PUSH is no longer the dominant paradigm in business, education, or civic life. Welcome to the foundational change that makes pull the dominant paradigm in our lives” (p. 49).
    --from The Power of Pull (Hagel III, et al., 2010)
    Three Levels of Pull
    First Level—Access
    Second Level—Attract
    Third Level—Achieve
    --(Hagel III, et al., 2010)
    Hagel III, J., Brown, J. S., & Davison, L. (2010). The power of pull: How small moves, smartly made, can set big things in motion. New York: Basic Books.
  • 7. access
    What is it?
    How can we utilize it?
    “Access involves the ability to find, learn about, and connect with resources (people, products, and knowledge) on an as-needed basis to address unanticipated needs” (p. 69).
    --(Hagel III, et al., 2010)
    Take advantage of search engines to connect with others who share our interests from whom we can gain valuable insights and to find products or services that are geared toward our areas of interest
    Keep in mind when searching for information that “access only truly works when we know what we’re looking for” (p. 93)
    --(Hagel III, et al., 2010)
    Hagel III, J., Brown, J. S., & Davison, L. (2010). The power of pull: How small moves, smartly made, can set big things in motion. New York: Basic Books.
  • 8. Attract
    What is it?
    How can we utilize it?
    The level of “Attract” focuses “on techniques for drawing people or resources to us that we were not even aware existed but that prove to be relevant and valuable” (p. 91).
    --(Hagel III, et al., 2010)
    “We can make choices that will increase our ability to attract people and resources to us that we never knew existed, leading to serendipitous encounters that prove enormously valuable to us” (p. 91).
    “Foster encounters with people who can be helpful in expanding our horizons and creating the new knowledge that enables us to achieve new levels of performance” (p. 94).
    --(Hagel III, et al., 2010)
    Hagel III, J., Brown, J. S., & Davison, L. (2010). The power of pull: How small moves, smartly made, can set big things in motion. New York: Basic Books.
  • 9. Choices we can make that will increase our chance of “serendipitous encounters”
    Choose environments to associate in where there are people that share your same passions—these can be physical or virtual environments
    Continue interacting with the individuals you come in contact with that you can learn from
    Contribute to the learning of these individuals just as they are contributing to you
    Be prepared to be pushed out of your “comfort zone” (p. 114)
    --(Hagel III, et al., 2010)
    Hagel III, J., Brown, J. S., & Davison, L. (2010). The power of pull: How small moves, smartly made, can set big things in motion. New York: Basic Books.
  • 10. achieve
    What is it?
    How can we utilize it?
    The goal is “achieving our full potential as individuals and institutions by pulling out of each of us the potential that resides within” (p. 123).
    This is done through “creation spaces” that “help participants engage with each other around collaborative creation activities” which ultimately leads to “exploring innovative approaches to particularly vexing problems” (p. 129-130).
    --(Hagel III, et al., 2010)
    Love what we do as educators
    Embrace the reward of seeing our students learn
    Be willing to work with others
    Recognize “opportunities available” in “creation spaces” (p. 139)
    --(Hagel III, et al., 2010)
    Hagel III, J., Brown, J. S., & Davison, L. (2010). The power of pull: How small moves, smartly made, can set big things in motion. New York: Basic Books.
  • 11. At snyder isd, we must be willing to collaborate with others…it is paramount to achieving the power of pull
    “Collaboration has always been central to value creation, but harnessing these three levels of pull will amplify the power of collaboration, producing increasing returns that previously have been beyond the reach of most collaboration efforts” (p. 19).
    --(Hagel III, et al., 2010)
    Just imagine what we can achieve in our school district by embracing the three levels of pull and working collaboratively with each other!!
    Hagel III, J., Brown, J. S., & Davison, L. (2010). The power of pull: How small moves, smartly made, can set big things in motion. New York: Basic Books.
  • 12. In order to reach pull in snyder isd…
    As individual employees…
    We must sharpen our focus, strive to understand and learn from others, be passionate about out interests and work, and avoidsituations that are going to distract us from gathering knowledge.
    As the entire school district…
    We must embrace the fact that we cannot keep doing things the “old” way and articulate the goal of changing to all employees. Leaders must identify talented and passionate people who are interested in pursuing new ideas and finding solutions to hardships the institution is facing, specifically by focusing on more information technology. Leaders must also be willing to evaluate themselves and the model they are setting for the employees.
    --(Hagel III, et al., 2010)
    Hagel III, J., Brown, J. S., & Davison, L. (2010). The power of pull: How small moves, smartly made, can set big things in motion. New York: Basic Books.
  • 13. Summary of key points to remember as we begin this journey and Additional ways snyder isd administrators and teachers can apply these principles to achieve the power of pull
    Budget permitting, attend conferences and workshops at which you can mingle and develop relationships with others that share your same passions
    Utilize online networks to establish relationships with others from which you can obtain knowledge
    Be willing to throw your pride out the window and be able to admit that you don’t know the answers to everything
    Embrace all opportunities presented to you that enable you to learn more
    Be open to what chance encounters might bring to you
    Make decisions that will lead to more chance encounters
    Collaborate with others
    Be passionate about your work
    Be willing to move away from the PUSH way you have always known, and be open to moving toward PULL
    --(Hagel III, et al., 2010)
    Hagel III, J., Brown, J. S., & Davison, L. (2010). The power of pull: How small moves, smartly made, can set big things in motion. New York: Basic Books.
  • 14. “Don’t think these strategies are only for CEO’s or other leaders who wield enormous influence and resources. They’re for YOU. Shaping strategies show how small moves, smartly made, can have an impact far beyond the initial resources and effort invested” (p. 29).
    and finally,
    “When people chase what they love, they will inevitably seek out and immerse themselves in knowledge flows, drinking deeply from new creative wells even as they contribute their own experiences and insights along the way. (Remember, just as you’re seeking out people on your edge, others are looking for you)” (p. 20).
    --(Hagel III, et al., 2010)
    “CHASE” YOUR PASSION…
    Hagel III, J., Brown, J. S., & Davison, L. (2010). The power of pull: How small moves, smartly made, can set big things in motion. New York: Basic Books.
  • 15. references
    Hagel III, J., Brown, J. S., & Davison, L. (2010). The power of pull: How small moves, smartly made, can set big things in motion. New York: Basic Books.