Trends in Teaching and Learning: Enhancing Academic Library Services

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Collaboration, Technologies, and Interactive instruction are foundational trends in the context of university teaching and learning. Each have functioned in isolation, often independently of another, as three separate silos.
1) Instructors collaborated to create curriculum.
2) Technologies are now ubiquitous with classroom instruction yet not always used to their maximum potentials
3) Instruction and learning are blended incorporating face-to-face class time with the expectation of participation in an online environment such as Moodle and Blackboard.
4) I believe that blended learning is heavily influenced by social / web 2.0 technologies engaging both instructors and students in new ways not only to the material covered but in the process of discovery which might be referred to as interactive engagement and include gaming. I believe blended learning is going to be the most changed trend in coming years.

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  • Click for animationWelcome. I am honoured to be here presenting to you today as part of the process for selecting an Information Literacy Librarian. Click
  • I have been asked to present on the question:“What are the most important variations or trends in university teaching & learning to be considered while enhancing library services?” CLICK - for animationI will present a few important trends, provide examples, and talk about what some libraries are doing and what libraries might be considering while enhancing library services.CLICK
  • Looking at the question, the keywords that caught my attention are:CLICKimportant, trends, teaching, learning, enhancing, and services.I have ruminated on the question reflecting upon my experiences to couch this presentation on a foundation from which ideas can develop and focus on executable activities for libraries and librarians
  • CLICKCollaborationCLICKTechnologiesCLICKand Interactive instructionare foundational trends in the context of university teaching and learning. Each have functioned in isolation, often independently of another, as three separate silos. Instructors collaborated to create curriculum. Technologies are now ubiquitous with classroom instruction yet not always used to their maximum potentialsInstruction and learning are blended incorporating face-to-face class time with the expectation of participation in an online environment such as Moodle and Blackboard. I believe that blended learning is heavily influenced by social / web 2.0 technologies engaging both instructors and students in new ways not only to the material covered but in the process of discovery which might be referred to as interactive engagement and include gaming. I believe blended learning is going to be the most changed trend in coming years.CLICK
  • No longer are these foundational elements acting in isolation, singularly,CLICK but are now often intuitively and routinely interconnected and unified in university teaching and learning environments. Blended instruction is the least constant of these trends informed by technology and explored through collaborationCLICK
  • CLICKWeb 2.0 has taught us the value of collaboration. Instructors and learners share information, data, research, and collaborate with others across campus’ , institutions, and nations demonstrating the power of various technologies including social web technologies. They find one another on blogs – personal or institutional, on Facebook and Twitter. CLICKInstructorsare entering the online social world to instruct where their students live – the tech-powered environment. Educators are using technologiesto engage students in curriculum content with tools such as Twitter, clickers, Poll-everywhere,iPads, and text messaging. Librarians create embedded objects such as podcasts, videos, and tutorials to deliver instruction.CLICKCourse management software such as Moodle or Blackboard extend and amplify the classroom teaching and learning to where students can access information, discussions, and complete quizzes in their own time, their own space. Blogs, wikis, and Twitter feeds embedded into these programs, interconnecting social technologies, offering opportunities to collaborate, disseminate information, and engage students.On Penn State’s Web learning website you will find a definition of blended learning stating: “In the past, digital materials have served in a supplementary role, helping to support face to face instruction.” Digital materials and technologies are no longer in supporting roles. I instruct information literacy sessions using Twitter not in a supplementary role but as a primary tool for cross-class and backchannel communication, assessment, and feedback. Incorporating technological instructional tools into teaching and learning offers instructors tremendous flexibility to provide students with multimedia-rich content at any time of day. Students are using iPads, tweeting, clickers to answer polls and quizzes, work with Google maps to complete a history, geography, or science project, and while spending one or two sessions a week in the physical classroom are expected to complete work in the online environment. CLICK
  • Click The most recent entry into the tech-powered, collaborative, and blended trend track is “mobile” use of applications including gaming. Instructors and students use mobile devices to access information repositories, scan QR codes to access embedded information in the library catalogue, on instructional support materials or wayfinding labels in the stacks, library research guides and resources, to share, collaborate, and broadcast.I read in a recent study that when using their devices mobile users spend 43% of their time using the technology and applications on their handsets to find and /or verify information. If that is anywhere near accurate, how do academic libraries enhance services for this user group? Click
  • Click, Click, Click, ClickThese trends are not new but what is emerging is now university instructors are synchronously integrating and melding these trends in teaching and learning environments. Technology use is at the core of innovative teaching and learning practices and enhancing library services. There are many examples of when collaboration, technologies, and blended instruction meld, but I will talk about a few. Click
  • ClickClemson University has designed a classroom using a converted swimming pool from a retired YMCA. Barbara Weaver, Clemson University’s manager of instructional services states; “ Our goal with the room's design is to explore the use of existing technologies while building in the ability to accommodate future technologies. We are in a position now to take advantage of the interactive age. We plan to share with other instructors and administrators what we learn in here, what works best for student comprehension and development."  Click
  • ClickThe 90-seat classroom is equipped with multiple projection screens, Internet access, and laptop computers. Tablets are used during class for students to submit solutions simultaneously and anonymously to the instructor. The instructor then projects, discusses, annotates and saves the submissions.  Session details are posted on a course management software where students access more information and exercises for follow-up work on their own time outside the classroom.This is demonstrates of collaboration actualized by the integration of various technologies, and realised in blended instruction practices.http://www.clemson.edu/media-relations/archive/newsroom/articles/top-stories/sandboxclassroom.php5 CLICK
  • CLICKLeveragingWeb 2.0 social web tools offers teaching and learning environments new opportunities to broaden and deepen collaboration and deliver flexible blended learning instruction. But how is this working? Are instructors embracing these technologies? What do students expect? Last January here at Concordia, a debate was organized by communications professor Leslie Shade Students were asked to reflect on a series of issues related to how universities, who rely on traditional forms of instruction, can meet the learning needs of digitally savvy students. They contributed through online discussions and a conversation, moderated by Shade. When reading about this session and watching the video, I was stuck by the passion with which ideas and perspectives on university teaching and learning are actively debated within the context of student experiences and expectations. Students expressed advanced ideas about what Web 2.0 technologies mean in the context of their university experience. Issues that arose included a perspective that some instructors seemed to be forced to use technologies about which they know little. Another point was made that the current number of social web technologies in use is overwhelming and yet the use of those technologies undervalued. Students voiced their hope that in the near future there will be a unification of social technologies. The value of this session was not lost on university staff. John Bently, a program coordinator and instructional developer at the Centre for Teaching and Learning Services (CTLS) commented that the discussion “can be used to help form Concordia’s planning policies and guidelines in terms of emerging technologies. Media platforms and learning in the 21st Century classroom.” Many universities have dedicated centres mandated to support innovation in teaching and learning. I have participated in workshops and events at such centers gaining insights into emerging instructional trends and practices, and share ideas with colleagues. I am always astonished at the expertise others enthusiastically share.
  • Librarians can bring expertise to other departments and programs in the university community, building relationships while positioning the library at the table where innovation is being discussed. Recently I’ve collaborated with the equivalent of your CTLC - Thompson Rivers University’s Teaching with Technology lunch and learn workshops program of the Centre for Student Engagement and Learning Innovation. I presented Twitter as an instructional tool and professional development to faculty. During the sessions participants tweeted using a hashtag creating a backchannel conversation where they shared insights, resources, and experiences.
  • ClickClickClickThese examples of rethinking and redesigning teaching and learning physical space, encouraging and supporting teaching and learning innovation, and opening the conversation to all stakeholders, demonstrate that the higher education community’s has an understanding of, need for, and commitment to teaching and learning based in collaboration, using technologies, and blended instruction.
  • An vivid example of these trends in action, especially the change of blended learning in university teaching and learning is the development of MOOC’s – Massive Open Online Courses. In 2008 at the University of Manitoba,George Siemens and Stephen Downes of the National Research Council –offered what is considered the first MOOC - where 2,300 people over 60 countries joined the course. This model of delivering high quality learning in a collaborative, blended, tech-powered format has expanded exponentially. It is estimated that these courses are not attended by million of students. Reporter John Bradshaw of the Globe and Mail reported on open education in Canada in last weekend’s paper. He wrote that in today’s university teaching and learning environment it is believed “that universities should be less protective of their newest ideas and brightest minds, allowing them to mingle more freely online”,Bradshaw when on to report that, “Of late, MOOCs have dominated the conversation around online learning. They drastically change distance learning, breaking down the barriers of geography and fees, while connecting students across the globe with each other and with some of the world’s top teaching talents.” The University of British Columbia and the University of Toronto are two Canadian universities participating in Coursera’s MOOC. Other free online courses are offer through edX, and Udacity.I am interested in MOOC as it is a trend university teaching and learning is exploring. I have signed on for a course offered through Duke University called” Think Again: How to Reason and Argue instructed by a Penn State professor and Health Informatics in the Cloud instructed a Georgia Tech instructor.Why? I am interested in the topics, I want to know how the courses are structured and delivered from a students perspective and if they differ from those I take from the University of Calgary and Victoria for which I pay. From a librarian’s perspective, I am interested to know how these courses are supported by libraries. To what resources are students pointed? What Library? Open Access?
  • Open-access (OA) literature is digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Each year a week is dedicated to highlight the concept and is an opportunity for the academic and research community to continue to learn about the potential benefits of Open Access, to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to help inspire wider participation in helping to make Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research.Open Access (OA) offers to increase the exposure and use of published research, and facilitate the ability to conduct research across available literature. Research funding agencies, academic institutions, researchers and scientists, teachers, librarians, students, and members of the general public are supporting a move towards Open Access in increasing numbers every year.There are OA archives or repositories and there are OA journals. A discussion on open access is for another presentation.
  • It is particularly important for students and researchers to understand the issues surrounding copyright and publishing, especially those actively engaged in research projects and the publishing process,. During Open Access week, Thompson River’s University Library is hosting an event with a headliner speaker from Simon Fraser University and faculty panel discussion. Thompson Rivers University does offers Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)  available through the database listing. In support of Open Access and open sources, I am writing an Open Sources Research guide using Springshare’sLibGuide platform, to support use of and research about open access sources. http://libguides.tru.ca/openaccess
  • Many libraries are collaborating with faculty to design and develop Institutional Repositories.While at the University of Lethbridge I assisted in a small way with the development of an institutional repository. At that point in development, promotion and training were key elements and project to which I contributed. In preparation for today, I learned that Concordia has a long standing repository considered one of the first in Canada.
  • ClickClickClickOpen Access, Institutional Repositories, and MOOC’s demonstrate cross pollination of ideas through collaboration using technologies and delivering variations of blended instruction. Ideas and opportunities resulting from integrating these three particular trends has the power to change the path of university teaching and learning and compel libraries to embrace and support such variances when considering enhancing services.
  • ClickClickClickBut what does that look like for libraries? What are libraries doing to enhance services & what services?
  • Demonstration of these three trends – collaboration, using technology, and blended learning - offers libraries and librarians flexible and creative ways to collaborate with faculty, re-tool our reference and instruction services, and extend services more deeply into the classroom and across our university community. Carolyn Carpan published a paper recently titled “Library services in the age of Google, Introducing Information Literacy 2.0” and lobs the following opening salvo: ClickClickClickAlthough academic librarians have become experts in using Web 2.0 techniques to promote library services, we are just beginning to think about how academic librarians can collaborate with faculty and information technologists to incorporate these tools and technologies into our teaching to support learning goals and outcomes.In our aim to deliver exemplary services the savvy and sophisticated university students or technologically curious instructors, we must consider other areas where we can collaborate – event planning, organizing data, evaluating tech tools, media/digital literacies, using appropriate Web 2.0 technologies in reference interactions and instruction sessions, I contend that we are already there, already doing this but perhaps not at levels needed to meet increasing demands of educators and students. Enhancing library services is not about offering more library tours, more reference and instructional opportunities;it’s about using Web 2.0 technologies to conduct tours, execute a reference interaction, and to instruct. Students are deft a finding information on YouTube, Flickr, and the Web . . . We are too. The next step is to determine which tech-powered tool to use to bridge users to library services and library resources.
  • ClickWe know students now need to know how to evaluate text, images, videos, podcasts, blogs, and tweets, to name a few, for their accuracy, reliability, and validity as information sources. We are already teaching evaluating tools and assessment rubrics. But could we do more? Could an enhanced library service in the context of information literacy include creating a teaching environment using Web 2.0 tools such as Twitter, Facebook, Blogs, and wikis for the one-off, single or embedded session and the term-long credit courses?ClickClickWe already show faculty how the technologies can support their work in the classroom and beyond campus walls – institutional repositories, open access. Libraries might consider enhancing library services to include Web 2.0 extending learning beyond the classroom. For example; have we been instructing faculty to use RSS readers, social bookmarking sites, and wikis to organize and share information for their student group projects? If not, what would it take or look like to enhance library services to incorporate these tools in the context of accessing library resources and services?We instruct information literacy session usually within the context of finding and evaluating resources. We could enrich those session by instructing faculty and students how to organize and share their information – resource lists, study results, projects, etc. – think social bookmarking like Delicious. Click
  • ClickClickClickThinking about the services we already enhance and the teaching and learning environment we support. . . What more could be do?
  • Considering front line service enhancements, screen casting is used by libraries for instruction and outreach / tutorials, as well as.Librarians use screen casting to create video tutorials to provide library tours, demonstrate conducting a keyword search in online databases, or show how to format citations. Using Jing to create an on the fly screen casting of a reference interaction, emailing that screen cast to the student turns a strained or failed reference transaction into a success. That teaching moment extends from the reference desk to the students environment. During information literacy instruction sessions, I often teach by modelling and use JING to screen cast a search that didn’t work and one that did, or screen cast the development of a citation telling the students I will upload it to the class Moodle where all students can access it and review it – an example of collaborating with students in the classroom using technology and demonstrating a blended learning approach continuing teaching and learning outside class time.While at Red Deer College where I was the Information Literacy Coordinator, I taught classes where a I used a Google Doc for students and the instructor to collaboratively write notes, ask questions, share information and resources during the class. Afterward, the Google Doc was accessed through the class BlackBoard. There are many more ways we might leverage these university teaching and learning trends. 1) QR codes for wayfinding, reference, instruction, and polling reaches and engages the mobile user 2) Pinterest – the online pin board for gathering and sharing images from web resources tapping into new trends for collections discovery, collaboration, and for instruction where classes open boards to create project or share resources. Pinterest offers opportunities for enhancing services by curating instruction resources, facilitating collaboration, teach as a discovery took, or create a reference resources board.
  • I presented a few important trends – collaboration, technologies, and blended learning, provided examples, and talked about what some libraries are doing and what libraries might consider when enhancing library services.The underpinning for these trends are binding principles by which library’s and librarians function, core values that define, inform, and guide our professional practice. All information resources that are provided directly or indirectly by the library, regardless of technology, format and should be readily, equally, and equitably accessible to all library users. (ALA) Core values of librarianship.We strive for excellence in the profession by maintaining and enhancing our own knowledge and skills.We are always learning. We are constantly exploring new ways of doing things better and doing better things.Finally, library’s and librarian continue to collaborate, explore using technologies, particularly social technologies or Web 2.0 technologies, and must now think about how to use those technologies in our services in a meaningful way, appropriately, yet creatively. I am honoured to have presented to you today and appreciation your attention.Thank You
  • Trends in Teaching and Learning: Enhancing Academic Library Services

    1. 1. University TEACHING LEARNING library services Julie Kent, Hons. B.A., M.L.I.S. http://juliekent.ca http://transliteracylibrarian.wordpress.com @agentlibrarianConcordia University Presentation / Julie Kent Hons. B.A., M.L.I.S./ October, 2012 1
    2. 2. “What are the most important variations or trends in university teaching presentation & learning to be considered while enhancing library services?”Concordia University Presentation / Julie Kent Hons. B.A., M.L.I.S./ October, 2012 2
    3. 3. “What are the most important variations or trends in university teaching & presentation learning considered while to be enhancing library services?”Concordia University Presentation / Julie Kent Hons. B.A., M.L.I.S./ October, 2012 3
    4. 4. Collaboration teaching & learning trends Using Technologies Blended Instruction 4Concordia University Presentation / Julie Kent Hons. B.A., M.L.I.S./ October, 2012
    5. 5. teaching & learning trends collaboration Blended Instruction Using Technologies Collaboration teaching & learning using blended technology instruction 5Concordia University Presentation / Julie Kent Hons. B.A., M.L.I.S./ October, 2012
    6. 6. Collaboration Using Technologies Blended Instruction 6Concordia University Presentation / Julie Kent Hons. B.A., M.L.I.S./ October, 2012
    7. 7. Mobile 7Concordia University Presentation / Julie Kent Hons. B.A., M.L.I.S./ October, 2012
    8. 8. Collaboration Using Technologies Blended Instruction 8Concordia University Presentation / Julie Kent Hons. B.A., M.L.I.S./ October, 2012
    9. 9. Clemson Universitys Holtzendorff Teaching with Technology Experimental Classroomhttp://www.clemson.edu/media-relations/archive/newsroom/articles/top-stories/sandboxclassroom.php5 9 Concordia University Presentation / Julie Kent Hons. B.A., M.L.I.S./ October, 2012
    10. 10. http://www.clemson.edu/media-relations/archive/newsroom/articles/top-stories/sandboxclassroom.php5 10Concordia University Presentation / Julie Kent Hons. B.A., M.L.I.S./ October, 2012
    11. 11. Social Media in the classroom http://www.concordia.ca/now/what-we-do/teaching/20120119/social-media-in-the-classroom.phpConcordia University Presentation / Julie Kent Hons. B.A., M.L.I.S./ October, 2012 11
    12. 12. Teaching Twitter with TechnologyConcordia University Presentation / Julie Kent Hons. B.A., M.L.I.S./ October, 2012 12
    13. 13. Collaboration teaching & learning trends Using Technologies Blended Instruction 13Concordia University Presentation / Julie Kent Hons. B.A., M.L.I.S./ October, 2012
    14. 14. MOOC Massive Open Online CourseConcordia University Presentation / Julie Kent Hons. B.A., M.L.I.S./ October, 2012 14
    15. 15. Open Access October 22 – 28th, 2012 Everywhere. http://www.openaccessweek.org/Concordia University Presentation / Julie Kent Hons. B.A., M.L.I.S./ October, 2012 15
    16. 16. Thompson Rivers University Library Open Access http://libguides.tru.ca/openaccessConcordia University Presentation / Julie Kent Hons. B.A., M.L.I.S./ October, 2012 16
    17. 17. Institutional RepositoriesConcordia University Presentation / Julie Kent Hons. B.A., M.L.I.S./ October, 2012 17
    18. 18. Collaboration teaching & learning trends Using Technologies Blended Instruction 18Concordia University Presentation / Julie Kent Hons. B.A., M.L.I.S./ October, 2012
    19. 19. enhancing library services 19Concordia University Presentation / Julie Kent Hons. B.A., M.L.I.S./ October, 2012
    20. 20. • academic librarians are expertslibrary services • think about collaborating • incorporate technologies into our teachingCarpan, C. (2010). Library services in the age of Google: Introducing Information Literacy 2.0. College & Undergraduate Libraries. 17, 106-113. DOI: 10.1080/10691310903584627Concordia University Presentation / Julie Kent Hons. B.A., M.L.I.S./ October, 2012 20
    21. 21. enhancing library services 21Concordia University Presentation / Julie Kent Hons. B.A., M.L.I.S./ October, 2012
    22. 22. Collaboration enhancing library services Using Technologies Blended Instruction 22Concordia University Presentation / Julie Kent Hons. B.A., M.L.I.S./ October, 2012
    23. 23. enhancing library servicesConcordia University Presentation / Julie Kent Hons. B.A., M.L.I.S./ October, 2012 23
    24. 24. Collaboration enhancing library services Using Technologies Blended Instruction 24Concordia University Presentation / Julie Kent Hons. B.A., M.L.I.S./ October, 2012

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