Concept Mapping
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Concept Mapping

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Library Information Fluency follow-up handout for Education students in 2nd year studies at a college in Western Canada, March 2011.

Library Information Fluency follow-up handout for Education students in 2nd year studies at a college in Western Canada, March 2011.

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Concept Mapping Concept Mapping Document Transcript

  • Information Capabilities Library Instruction – Information LiteracyConcept MappingConcept mapping (and other visualinformation organization techniques) is amethod used to represent informationgraphically as you organize or brainstormconcepts, identify hierarchies, and perhaps,find your way to higher-level, criticalthinking. See fig.1.Mind maps are used to summarize books,organize information for essays andarticles, or brainstorm ideas.This handout will guide you as you makeconcept maps and use other kinds of visualrepresentations to organize information.Here are some books on concept mapping Fig. 1. St. Aloysious College. See examples ofand related subjects: explicit mind maps and a wide variety of others for use in specific subject areas: Collaborative http://www.sac.sa.edu.au/Library/Library/Topics/t Learning: Using hinking_skills/program9.html Concept Mapping Authors: Patricia Lupion Torres, Rita de Cassia Veiga Marriott Available through Inter Library Loan (ILL). Ask a librarian for help requesting this book through our ILL service. Call number LB 1032 H367 2010The Back of the Napkin by Dan RoamCall Number HD 30.29 R636 2008This book is on the second floor of the library. 1|PageCreated by Julie Anne Kent, Hons. B.A., M.L.I.S. Academic Librarian, March 2011/Updated October 2012This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License.
  • Information Capabilities Library Instruction – Information LiteracyConcept MappingThis tool is a dynamic and active learning strategy taking you from rote learning and memorization tocritical thinking. You will be able to see all important ideas and concepts of your topic on one page –great for reviewing. What is it?  A graphical and visual way of organizing your ideas and showing where and how concepts are related or differentiated  Connected branches linking a central or core concept to subtopics and related ideas  Concepts and ideas are labelled by relationship, cause & effect, hierarchies, contraindications Why use it?  A visual representation of organizing your ideas and showing where and how concepts are related or differentiated  Help you to identify what aspects of the concept you know well and where gaps in your knowledge appear  Clearly identifying relationships between ideas and concepts from which you can choose to focus or expand How is it used?  Study and review for tests, exams, assignments  Demonstrate processes, relationships, systems  Brainstorming individually or in groups  Documenting prior knowledge, asking questions, organizing arguments, asking questions Who can use it?  Anyone. Everyone.  Singularly or collectively  Corporate teams, college students, professionals, lay people, primary school students, teachers, etc. How is it created?  Place central idea or concept in centere of page  Write down all known knowledge of concept on branches and lines radiated from central idea  Organize ideas according to importance, hierarchy, association, differences, etc.  Use images, different fonts, colours, etc.  Indicate where possible equations, explanations, definitions, synonyms 2|PageCreated by Julie Anne Kent, Hons. B.A., M.L.I.S. Academic Librarian, March 2011/Updated October 2012This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License.
  • Information Capabilities Library Instruction – Information Literacy Then what?  Analyse and assess your map as you create it  Look to see how the ideas fit together  Is your core concept or research question accurately defined or stated?  Have I looked in reference books, my class and lab notes, etc. for associating ideas and words?  Have I used colours and images to sufficiently indicate conditions, relevancy, logic, and other details?  Where are the most confusing sections of the map and how can I better organize and clarify those points?CONNECTIVE TISSUE CONCEPT MAPThis concept map was created collaboratively over several days for the purpose of consolidation and review.Created by Learning Commons Peer Helpers: Kaïssa de Boer, Melissa Harvey and Ian Wagg © 2010 3|PageCreated by Julie Anne Kent, Hons. B.A., M.L.I.S. Academic Librarian, March 2011/Updated October 2012This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License.
  • Information Capabilities Library Instruction – Information Literacy 4|PageCreated by Julie Anne Kent, Hons. B.A., M.L.I.S. Academic Librarian, March 2011/Updated October 2012This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License.