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Regeneration with a human face
 

Regeneration with a human face

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These slides were used to illustrate a lecture at Sheffield University, 'Regeneration with a human face: responsible urban recovery'. They look at the problem of knowing 'what works' in regeneration ...

These slides were used to illustrate a lecture at Sheffield University, 'Regeneration with a human face: responsible urban recovery'. They look at the problem of knowing 'what works' in regeneration and propose six people-centred approaches that can help us move forward. You can read the full text of the lecture here: http://urbanpollinators.co.uk/?page_id=1820

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    Regeneration with a human face Regeneration with a human face Presentation Transcript

    • Regeneration with a human facecan people-centred approaches help us develop policies thatwork?
    • A long and winding roadHow we got here and the challenge of knowing what worksThe persistence of palatable paradigmsQuestions that are embarrassing to ask in publicStepping stones to reciprocal regenerationSix pillars of people-centred policyRediscovering reciprocityFrom ‘something for nothing’ to sustainable livelihoods1234
    • Home sweet home: a way of thinking?‘Objects and places are centres of value. They attract or repel infinely shaded degrees.’ (Yi-Fu Tuan, Space and Place)
    • A long and winding roadHow we got here and the challenge of knowing what worksThe persistence of palatable paradigmsQuestions that are embarrassing to ask in publicStepping stones to reciprocal regenerationSix pillars of people-centred policyRediscovering reciprocityFrom ‘something for nothing’ to sustainable livelihoods1234
    • ‘Not knowing what works’‘The closer you get to the ground, the more intertwined thesocial issues are.’ (Chanan and Miller, Rethinking CommunityPractice)
    • ‘Not knowing what works’‘Within ten to 20 years, nobody should be seriouslydisadvantaged by where they live.’ (Tony Blair, Bringing BritainTogether, 2001)
    • ‘Not knowing what works’‘Raising the growth rate in all regions and reducing the gap ingrowth rates between regions remains extremelychallenging.’ (HM Treasury, Sub-national review of economicdevelopment and regeneration, 2007)
    • Definitions and destinations‘Regeneration is the action of citizens and those who work withthem to recreate home for new times, especially where there ispoverty and disadvantage.’ (New Start magazine, 2010)
    • The retreat from complexity‘It is only through economic growth that as a country we willhave the resources and opportunities to tackle unemployment,poverty, poor health and inequality...’ (DCLG, 2012)
    • The ‘get a job’ regeneration creed‘For too long, we’ve had a system where people who did theright thing - who get up in the morning and work hard - feltpenalised for it, while people who did the wrong thing gotrewarded for it.’ (George Osborne, 2 April 2013)
    • ‘Get a job’ regeneration in actionIn March, DFS in Wolverhampton advertised 22 jobs. Therewere 2,497 applicants.In February, Costa Coffee in Nottingham advertised 8 jobs.There were 1,700 applicants.Every month another 10,000 working families require housingbenefit to help pay the rent.
    • A long and winding roadHow we got here and the challenge of knowing what worksThe persistence of palatable paradigmsQuestions that are embarrassing to ask in publicStepping stones to reciprocal regenerationSix pillars of people-centred policyRediscovering reciprocityFrom ‘something for nothing’ to sustainable livelihoods1234
    • What if ‘growth’ is part of the problem?‘Prosperity for the few founded on ecological destruction andpersistent social injustice is no foundation for a civilisedsociety.’ (Tim Jackson, Prosperity Without Growth)Graphs: Tax Research UK, August 2012 (left); Earth Policy Institute, 2013 (right)
    • Is a blame culture making things worse?63% say the benefits system is not working; 72% say politiciansshould do more to cut benefits; 84% say there should be strictertesting for incapacity benefits (Ipsos MORI poll, October 2011)
    • C20 paradigms: nasty, brutish and rich?‘The realities of poverty, anxiety, environmental degradation,and unhappiness in the midst of great plenty should not beregarded as mere curiosities. They require our urgentattention...” (Jeffrey Sachs, World Happiness Report)
    • A long and winding roadHow we got here and the challenge of knowing what worksThe persistence of palatable paradigmsQuestions that are embarrassing to ask in publicStepping stones to reciprocal regenerationSix pillars of people-centred policyRediscovering reciprocityFrom ‘something for nothing’ to sustainable livelihoods1234
    • All in it together: WECH, London‘If more places were like WECH there would be morehappiness.’ (Local resident, 2010)
    • All in it together: Giroscope, Hull‘Being based in the community, you get to know the intricaciesof streets right down to quite a local level.’ (Martin Newman,Giroscope)
    • All in it together: If you eat, you’re in‘This isn’t a veg scheme, it’s a behaviour shift scheme.’ (PamWarhurst, Incredible Edible Todmorden)
    • Reframing reciprocity: the Big Society?‘If the big society is anything better than a slogan... discussionhas to take on board what it is to be a citizen and where it is thatwe most deeply and helpfully acquire the resources of civicidentity and dignity.’ Rowan Williams, July 2012
    • Reframing reciprocity: relational welfare‘Taking the “relational practice” concept seriously would involvethe largest departure from the traditional focus of welfarepolicy... the central concern would be whether welfare treatspeople as human beings.’ (Graeme Cooke, Contributory Welfare)
    • Reframing reciprocity: building trust‘Reputation is a personal reward that is intimately bound upwith respecting and considering the needs of others.’ (RachelBotsman and Roo Rogers, What’s Mine is Yours)
    • Towards sustainable livelihoods‘The starting point is not deprivation but assets: the strengthsand capabilities of people living in poverty, and the strategiesthey use, through drawing on these different assets, to “getby”.’ (IPPR, Community Assets First)
    • A long and winding roadHow we got here and the challenge of knowing what worksThe persistence of palatable paradigmsQuestions that are embarrassing to ask in publicStepping stones to reciprocal regenerationSix pillars of people-centred policyRediscovering reciprocityFrom ‘something for nothing’ to sustainable livelihoods1234
    • Stepping stone 1: build networks‘“Familiar strangers” like postmen and dustmen appear to beunder-utilised community resources... more people recogniseand find value in their postman than in their localcouncillor.’ (Connected Communities, RSA)
    • Stepping stone 2: build resilience‘...translational leaders play a critical role, frequently behind thescenes, connecting constituencies, and weaving various networks,perspectives, knowledge systems and agendas into a coherentwhole.’ (Andrew Zolli and Ann Marie Healy, Resilience)
    • Stepping stone 3: build participationA study of participatory budgeting in Govanhill, Glasgow, foundthat ‘the process has enabled purposeful and reciprocal dialoguebetween community members and the public and third sectors’.(Harkins and Egan, 2012)
    • Stepping stone 4: ownership & accessIn 35 years, Coin Street Community Builders has turned 13acres of derelict land on London’s South Bank into a thrivingneighbourhood, with co-operative housing, businesses, gardensand a riverside walkway.
    • Stepping stone 5: maximise rewardsOrganisations such as WiganPlus and Rewardyourworld.comare developing reward schemes where people can earn points forvolunteering or supporting local businesses, and spend them onlocal services or donate them to charities.
    • Stepping stone 6: build the job market‘Services that are provided within a locality should be done asfar as possible by the people who live there, and public servicecontracts specified in ways that facilitate this.’ (ResPublica,Responsible Recovery)
    • Three redistributions: income, work, value‘The true meaning of life is to plant trees under whose shadeyou do not expect to sit.’ (Nelson Henderson)