A Luddite analysis of smart(er) cities
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A Luddite analysis of smart(er) cities

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There's more to smart cities than technology and traffic management. Really smart cities are cities that think about the future and how to ensure everyone can enjoy the benefits of urban improvements. ...

There's more to smart cities than technology and traffic management. Really smart cities are cities that think about the future and how to ensure everyone can enjoy the benefits of urban improvements. This presentation seeks to challenge conventional thinking on smart cities and raise the questions that really need to be addressed.

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A Luddite analysis of smart(er) cities A Luddite analysis of smart(er) cities Presentation Transcript

  • Trouble at t’mill A Luddite analysis of Smart[er] Cities? Julian Dobson • Urban Pollinators
  • Luddite (n.) ‘Person engaged in seeking to obstruct progress’ Really?
  • ‘In the foolishness of their hearts, they imagined that the maintenance and well- doing of the industrious poor were objects of a greater consequence than the enrichment of a few individuals...’ ~ Lord Byron, 1812
  • The Luddite agenda ~ skills ~ livelihoods ~ communities
  • ‘When capital enlists science in her service, the refractory hand of labour will always be taught docility.’ ~ Andrew Ure, 1835
  • Can slower be smarter? five principles for ‘smart cities’
  • Thought before technology it’s too easy to do something because everyone else thinks a good idea
  • Conversation before control do our technologies open up conversations or remove interaction?
  • The potential before the problem do we regard cities as social problems to be solved, or as places of possibility?
  • Fun before fear are we applying technology to build quality of life, or to ‘deliver us from evil’?
  • Cities for the next generation 100 years on, what will we think was smart?
  • Smarter sustainable livelihoods how will we help people up the ‘livelihoods ladder’ - from surviving to coping, to adapting, to accumulating?
  • Smarter lifetime communities how is technology helping us create communities where people can stay throughout their lives?
  • Smarter civic networking are we putting social tools in citizens’ hands and helping them learn how to use them to create change?
  • Smarter access to finance how can we build on the success of crowdfunding to create opportunities for enterprise?
  • Smarter ways to define value how can we ensure our cities encourage smarter perceptions of what creates social and economic value?
  • Smarter thinking on placekeeping if smart cities don’t preserve and sustain our natural environment, how smart can they claim to be?
  • Smart is a state of mind skills • livelihoods • communities