Creating Moving Images
      Juliancoultas@mac.com
      www.digitalroadtrip.org
a route .....
a route .....                                            start with....

                                     Photo/images...
a route .....                                               start with....

                                       Photo/i...
a route .....                                               start with....

                                       Photo/i...
a route .....                                               start with....

                                       Photo/i...
Models
Models

In the classroom
Explore > Plan > Create > Edit > Share/Publish > Review
Models

In the classroom
Explore > Plan > Create > Edit > Share/Publish > Review


In Industry
Pre production > Production...
The Process
The Process
• Telling stories - events - fiction - non fiction
• Screen Writers (film)- scripts and action
• Director - in ch...
Shot Types that help tell a story




          source Google images
Planning + Story Telling
Example Pro Storyboard
        source Google images
Contrast and
   juxtaposition
  of shots creates
interest and drama
source BBC iPlayer


                     Framing/Shot Type examples
                      from BBC’s Design for Life
Camera Movement



    Pan - left and right
    Tilt - up and down
Track - following the action
Random Top tips
1. Storyboard in pencil - encourage students to frame the action in a
way that supports the meaning of the...
Doing it in class!

Combining shot types, angles, camera movement
Establishing Shot
Your audience is limited to what
you show them so it's important to
let them know where you are.
Usually...
Long Shot
A long shot allows your audience to see
everything. It shows the big picture.


Continuity Considerations
This s...
Long Shot
A long shot allows your audience to see
everything. It shows the big picture.


Continuity Considerations
This s...
Medium Shot
This shot gets rid of any distractions in the
picture and starts the process of zeroing in
on the action.


Co...
Medium Shot
This shot gets rid of any distractions in the
picture and starts the process of zeroing in
on the action.


Co...
Extreme Close-up
Use this shot to focus attention on what's
important. It enlarges small objects to
show details.


Contin...
Extreme Close-up
Use this shot to focus attention on what's
important. It enlarges small objects to
show details.


Contin...
Close-up
This shot cuts out extraneous visual material.
Faces should fill up the screen. Who wants to
see a person's feet w...
Close-up
This shot cuts out extraneous visual material.
Faces should fill up the screen. Who wants to
see a person's feet w...
Reestablishing Shot
This shot reminds people where
you are.

Continuity Considerations
It's good to end with a shot that
r...
Reestablishing Shot
This shot reminds people where
you are.

Continuity Considerations
It's good to end with a shot that
r...
complete text
complete text
Continuity


A good videographer and editor will look for movements
within a sequence that tie the shots together.

When c...
Conitnuity - 180 degree rule / crossing the line




                                                    Anywhere
        ...
Let’s shoot!
Juliancoultas@mac.com
www.digitalroadtrip.org
Framing+Continuity
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Framing+Continuity

1,065 views
1,030 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,065
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
5
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
55
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • PBS 45 & 49 is two separately licensed public television stations (WNEO and WEAO) operating under one 501(c)(3) corporation, Northeastern Educational Television of Ohio, Inc. (NETO). WNEO/PBS 45 was established in 1971, is licensed to the city of Alliance and serves the Youngstown designated television market. WEAO/PBS 49 went on the air in 1975, is licensed to the city of Akron and serves the Cleveland/Akron/Canton designated television market. All programming is simulcast on the two signals.
  • Framing+Continuity

    1. 1. Creating Moving Images Juliancoultas@mac.com www.digitalroadtrip.org
    2. 2. a route .....
    3. 3. a route ..... start with.... Photo/images (a simpler unit of meaning, they don’t move, but they can speak!)
    4. 4. a route ..... start with.... Photo/images (a simpler unit of meaning, they don’t move, but they can speak!) move to.... Audio (more complex - time based layers of sound a sound canvas)
    5. 5. a route ..... start with.... Photo/images (a simpler unit of meaning, they don’t move, but they can speak!) move to.... Audio (more complex - time based layers of sound a sound canvas) both feed into
    6. 6. a route ..... start with.... Photo/images (a simpler unit of meaning, they don’t move, but they can speak!) move to.... Audio (more complex - time based layers of sound a sound canvas) both feed into Moving images (the most complex - time based and visual)
    7. 7. Models
    8. 8. Models In the classroom Explore > Plan > Create > Edit > Share/Publish > Review
    9. 9. Models In the classroom Explore > Plan > Create > Edit > Share/Publish > Review In Industry Pre production > Production > Post Production
    10. 10. The Process
    11. 11. The Process • Telling stories - events - fiction - non fiction • Screen Writers (film)- scripts and action • Director - in charge of creative decisions • Pre Production team - storyboard artists • Production team (sound-camera-direction + edit) • Post production team (titles, credits, music, effects, stills and voice overs) • Distribution - Exhibition - Self Publish
    12. 12. Shot Types that help tell a story source Google images
    13. 13. Planning + Story Telling
    14. 14. Example Pro Storyboard source Google images
    15. 15. Contrast and juxtaposition of shots creates interest and drama
    16. 16. source BBC iPlayer Framing/Shot Type examples from BBC’s Design for Life
    17. 17. Camera Movement Pan - left and right Tilt - up and down Track - following the action
    18. 18. Random Top tips 1. Storyboard in pencil - encourage students to frame the action in a way that supports the meaning of the moment 2. Try storyboard with a stills camera -use comic life as layout tool 3. Include timings of action and camera movement on storyboards 4. Use a tripod (unless there is an artistic reason for hand held!) 5. Use a paper clapper board at the beginning of each scene ( number the scenes and the take.) An A4 jotter will suffice. 6. refrain from using the zoom - set the shot up 7. Explore rhythm and tempo when editing 8. Explore the use of none-diegetic* sound creatively * sound that isn’t within the world of the characters eg. music
    19. 19. Doing it in class! Combining shot types, angles, camera movement
    20. 20. Establishing Shot Your audience is limited to what you show them so it's important to let them know where you are. Usually a long shot. Continuity Considerations Plan how you enter and exit the frame so the edited sequence looks like one continuous action.
    21. 21. Long Shot A long shot allows your audience to see everything. It shows the big picture. Continuity Considerations This shot allows the editor to match the action in the previous shot. The edit should take place when the man is in approximately the same location in each shot.
    22. 22. Long Shot A long shot allows your audience to see everything. It shows the big picture. Continuity Considerations This shot allows the editor to match the action in the previous shot. The edit should take place when the man is in approximately the same location in each shot.
    23. 23. Medium Shot This shot gets rid of any distractions in the picture and starts the process of zeroing in on the action. Continuity Considerations The editor should allow the man to walk out of the previous shot then walk into this shot. This helps the audience get a sense of the size of the room.
    24. 24. Medium Shot This shot gets rid of any distractions in the picture and starts the process of zeroing in on the action. Continuity Considerations The editor should allow the man to walk out of the previous shot then walk into this shot. This helps the audience get a sense of the size of the room.
    25. 25. Extreme Close-up Use this shot to focus attention on what's important. It enlarges small objects to show details. Continuity Considerations The editor should match the hand location in the previous shot.
    26. 26. Extreme Close-up Use this shot to focus attention on what's important. It enlarges small objects to show details. Continuity Considerations The editor should match the hand location in the previous shot.
    27. 27. Close-up This shot cuts out extraneous visual material. Faces should fill up the screen. Who wants to see a person's feet when they are saying something we need to hear? Continuity Considerations This close-up is used as a cutaway. A cutaway is any shot that covers an edit. It's most commonly used to shorten interviews.
    28. 28. Close-up This shot cuts out extraneous visual material. Faces should fill up the screen. Who wants to see a person's feet when they are saying something we need to hear? Continuity Considerations This close-up is used as a cutaway. A cutaway is any shot that covers an edit. It's most commonly used to shorten interviews.
    29. 29. Reestablishing Shot This shot reminds people where you are. Continuity Considerations It's good to end with a shot that reminds people where you are. Exiting the frame is also a good closer.
    30. 30. Reestablishing Shot This shot reminds people where you are. Continuity Considerations It's good to end with a shot that reminds people where you are. Exiting the frame is also a good closer.
    31. 31. complete text
    32. 32. complete text
    33. 33. Continuity A good videographer and editor will look for movements within a sequence that tie the shots together. When changing to a different shot within a sequence, you should plan to have things in the same position. For example,when switching from a medium shot to a close-up of someone writing, their hand should be in the same place when the edit is made. Make sure movement in the frame goes in the same direction. For example, have your actor walk out of the frame to the left and into the next shot from the right. http://www.pbs4549.org
    34. 34. Conitnuity - 180 degree rule / crossing the line Anywhere this side of the dotted line is OK!
    35. 35. Let’s shoot! Juliancoultas@mac.com www.digitalroadtrip.org

    ×