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Teen/'Tween Proof Your Home
 

Teen/'Tween Proof Your Home

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Online version of our "Teen/'Tween - Proof Your Home Class."For more information, visit http://preventionlane.org. Updated July 2013.

Online version of our "Teen/'Tween - Proof Your Home Class."For more information, visit http://preventionlane.org. Updated July 2013.

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  • How many of you Baby-Proofed your home when your child was a baby/toddler?What were you concerned about? (list the concerns) How many of you have Teen-Proofed your home?What were you concerned about? (list all the concerns)Its all about keeping your child safe and healthywhat SAFETY issues are you most concerned about regarding your teen?list all ideas/group similar ones, etc. What are some ways you can minimize those risks, increase safety in your home?list all ideas STUDENTS: what would you like your parents to do to keep you safe?
  • How many of you Baby-Proofed your home when your child was a baby/toddler?What were you concerned about? (list the concerns) How many of you have Teen-Proofed your home?What were you concerned about? (list all the concerns)Its all about keeping your child safe and healthywhat SAFETY issues are you most concerned about regarding your teen?list all ideas/group similar ones, etc. What are some ways you can minimize those risks, increase safety in your home?list all ideas STUDENTS: what would you like your parents to do to keep you safe?
  • How many of you Baby-Proofed your home when your child was a baby/toddler?What were you concerned about? (list the concerns) How many of you have Teen-Proofed your home?What were you concerned about? (list all the concerns)Its all about keeping your child safe and healthywhat SAFETY issues are you most concerned about regarding your teen?list all ideas/group similar ones, etc. What are some ways you can minimize those risks, increase safety in your home?list all ideas STUDENTS: what would you like your parents to do to keep you safe?
  • There’s a common misconception that teens only listen to their friends. Regardless of what they tell you otherwise, they DO listen to you. Student Wellness Surveys show that kids listen to their parents.Over 70% of children say parents are the leading influence in their decision to drink or not (The Century Council, "Are You Doing Your Part?" 2010.).
  • Alcohol: keep locked/keep trackAlcohol is the most widely used addictive substance in OregonOne in three Lane County 8th graders, and almost half of Lane County 11th graders, had an alcoholic beverage at least once in the last month 45% of those who began drinking before age 14 developed later alcohol dependence, compared with only 10% of those who waited until they were 21 or older to start drinkingIn Oregon, youth who drink are more likely to be involved in other risky behaviorsYouth who drink are 8 times more likely to smoke cigarettes and 10 times more likely to smoke marijuanaRepeated alcohol exposure can alter the trajectory, or path, of teen brain development impacting adolescents even after they become adults. Even occasional heavy drinking injures young brains. Underage drinking is a leading contributor to death from injuries, which are the main cause of death for people under age 21.
  • Alcohol: keep locked/keep trackAlcohol is the most widely used addictive substance in OregonOne in three Lane County 8th graders, and almost half of Lane County 11th graders, had an alcoholic beverage at least once in the last month 45% of those who began drinking before age 14 developed later alcohol dependence, compared with only 5% of those who waited until they were 21 or older to start drinking.In Oregon, youth who drink are more likely to be involved in other risky behaviorsYouth who drink are 8 times more likely to smoke cigarettes and 10 times more likely to smoke marijuanaRepeated alcohol exposure can alter the trajectory, or path, of teen brain development impacting adolescents even after they become adults. Even occasional heavy drinking injures young brains. Underage drinking is a leading contributor to death from injuries, which are the main cause of death for people under age 21.
  • Alcohol: keep locked/keep trackAlcohol is the most widely used addictive substance in OregonOne in three Lane County 8th graders, and almost half of Lane County 11th graders, had an alcoholic beverage at least once in the last month 45% of those who began drinking before age 14 developed later alcohol dependence, compared with only 10% of those who waited until they were 21 or older to start drinkingIn Oregon, youth who drink are more likely to be involved in other risky behaviorsYouth who drink are 8 times more likely to smoke cigarettes and 10 times more likely to smoke marijuanaRepeated alcohol exposure can alter the trajectory, or path, of teen brain development impacting adolescents even after they become adults. Even occasional heavy drinking injures young brains. Underage drinking is a leading contributor to death from injuries, which are the main cause of death for people under age 21.
  • Teen parties: limit guest list; invite by phone, mail vs. email, set clear rules, checkMixed message when you allow underage drinking in your homeParents can be the excuse for youth who are hesitant to say no to drinking, drugs, etc. at partiesmake sure your teen knows they can call you if they need a safe ride homeEstablish clear rules—make sure they are realisticYouth who parents set clear rules for them are less likely to report using illicit drugs (national PRIDE
  • OTC/Prescription Meds: Lock & monitor; only buy what you need; dispose unused“Prescription drugs found in home medicine cabinets across the country have become the drug of choice among teens and every teen is at risk,” Ray Bullman, Exec. VP of National Council on Patient Information & EducationPrescription drugs are misused more by teens than any illicit drug, except marijuana (SAMHSA national Survey on Drug Use & Health) 60% of teens who have abused prescription painkillers did so before age 15Nationally, 1 in 5 teens has abused prescription drugsDangers: increased heart rate/bp, brain damage, overdose/poisoning, addiction, seizures, deathhttp://www.lockthecabinet.com/how/how-to-lock-the-cabinet/
  • Household Cleaners & Poisons: inventory, lock, monitorInhalant abuseMixing ingredients can produce toxic/deadly fumesOne in four 6th graders have used inhalants.High of choice for 6-12 year oldsCan lead to later abuse of illegal drugs
  • Household Cleaners & Poisons: inventory, lock, monitorInhalant abuseMixing ingredients can produce toxic/deadly fumesOne in four 6th graders have used inhalants.High of choice for 6-12 year oldsCan lead to later abuse of illegal drugs
  • Internet Use: Computer placed in open room so can monitor; check website use-block inappropriate sitesSocial networking sites: check privacy settings so identifying info not available to outsiders, even “friends of friends.” Become a “friend” to them on FacebookCheck privacy settings so identifying info not available to outsiders, even “friends of friends.” Insist on access to their pages. Online gamblingCELL PHONE: GPS device activatedhttp://preventionlane.org/parents/Net-Cetera-Chatting-with-Kids-About-Being-Online1.pdf
  • Internet Use: Computer placed in open room so can monitor; check website use-block inappropriate sitesSocial networking sites: check privacy settings so identifying info not available to outsiders, even “friends of friends.” Become a “friend” to them on FacebookCheck privacy settings so identifying info not available to outsiders, even “friends of friends.” Insist on access to their pages. Online gamblingCELL PHONE: GPS device activatedhttp://preventionlane.org/parents/Net-Cetera-Chatting-with-Kids-About-Being-Online1.pdf
  • Internet Use: Computer placed in open room so can monitor; check website use-block inappropriate sitesSocial networking sites: check privacy settings so identifying info not available to outsiders, even “friends of friends.” Become a “friend” to them on FacebookCheck privacy settings so identifying info not available to outsiders, even “friends of friends.” Insist on access to their pages. Online gamblingCELL PHONE: GPS device activatedhttp://preventionlane.org/parents/Net-Cetera-Chatting-with-Kids-About-Being-Online1.pdf
  • http://www.stopbullying.gov/prevention/talking-about-it/index.htmlSigns of bullying & cyberbullying: withdrawal from family/friends, anxious when they get a text or callDepressed/frustrated/suicidalTips on cyberbullying protection: internet & mobile safetyWHS resourcesDepression is common for the bullies in addition to the the bullied.Bethel S.D. policy:http://163.41.16.10/policies/JFCF%20P.pdf Harassment policy in the WHS handbook: http://www.bethel.k12.or.us/willamette/files/2012/02/WHS-Hand-book-PDF-2011-2012.pdf
  • Signs of bullying & cyberbullying: withdrawal from family/friends, anxious when they get a text or callDepressed/frustrated/suicidalTips on cyberbullying protection: internet & mobile safetyWHS resourcesDepression is common for the bullies in addition to the the bullied.Bethel S.D. policy:http://163.41.16.10/policies/JFCF%20P.pdf Harassment policy in the WHS handbook: http://www.bethel.k12.or.us/willamette/files/2012/02/WHS-Hand-book-PDF-2011-2012.pdf
  • http://public.health.oregon.gov/DiseasesConditions/InjuryFatalityData/Documents/Suicide,%20Suicide%20Attempts,%20and%20Ideation%20among%20Adolescents%20in%20Oregon.pdfIn 2009, 18% of 8th graders and 14% of 11th graders seriously considered suicide in the past year.(page 7, decimals rounded to nearest percentage)Firearms: Store in LOCKED cabinet Store UNLOADED & keep ammo separatedUse trigger LOCKstore unloaded, store in locked cabinet, use trigger lock, ammo separated26% of firearms found in homes are loaded; 64% of those are also unlockedGuns in the home increase the risk of youth accidents & suicide 2/3 of all teen suicides involve gunsSuicide is the second leading cause of injury death among Oregon youth 10-24 (motor vehicle injury is 1st)Over half the suicide deaths in youth ages 10-24 are from firearms. (10% from poison)
  • Firearms: store unloaded, store in locked cabinet, use trigger lock, ammo separated26% of firearms found in homes are loaded; 64% of those are also unlockedGuns in the home increase the risk of youth accidents & suicide 2/3 of all teen suicides involve gunsSuicide is the second leading cause of injury death among Oregon youth 10-24 (motor vehicle injury is 1st)Over half the suicide deaths in youth ages 10-24 are from firearms. (10% from poison)
  •  ClosingAlthough can’t teen-proof your teen…Be authoritative not authoritarian; set clear limits/communicate expectations i.e., youth who know their parents disapprove of underage drinking are less likely to drink alcohol. Keep communicating with your teen; staying engaged 
  •  ClosingAlthough can’t teen-proof your teen…Be authoritative not authoritarian; set clear limits/communicate expectations i.e., youth who know their parents disapprove of underage drinking are less likely to drink alcohol. Keep communicating with your teen; staying engaged 
  •  ClosingAlthough can’t teen-proof your teen…Be authoritative not authoritarian; set clear limits/communicate expectations i.e., youth who know their parents disapprove of underage drinking are less likely to drink alcohol. Keep communicating with your teen; staying engaged 

Teen/'Tween Proof Your Home Teen/'Tween Proof Your Home Presentation Transcript

  • Online Version www.preventionlane.org Modified July 2013
  • Image source: http://www.abc.virginia.gov/Education/underagedrinking/UnderAgeDrinking.pdf
  • are the #1 INFLUENCE in your teen’s life. Image source: http://www.abc.virginia.gov/Education/underagedrinking/UnderAgeDrinking.pdf Know that
  • Monitor, be there, talk. • Maintain family rituals such as eating  dinner together.  • Incorporate religious and spiritual practices  into family life.  • Engage the larger “family” of your  children's friends, teachers, classmates,  neighbors and community. 
  • Image source: fanpop.com
  • (Click the link to go to Dr.  Ken Winters’ video on  the teen brain – he helps explain why  teens are so weird!)
  • The PREFRONTAL CORTEX is the LAST PART to develop. years old! The brain is still developing until
  • ALCOHOL is the #1 drug used by youth Source: Student Wellness Survey 2012 11th Grade Students – Past 30 Day Use 8th Grade Students – Past 30 Day Use
  • What’s a “standard” serving of alcohol?
  • Youth who drink are 8x more likely to smoke cigarettes and 10x more likely to smoke marijuana. Even occasional heavy drinking injures young brains.
  • Lifetime problems based on age that drinking starts: But look  what  happens  when  they  wait to  start! 
  • • NO booze is safe for teens. • It’s illegal and damages young brains. • Keep your alcohol locked up – and keep  track of it (mark liquor bottles, count cans  etc.) • Be the parent!
  • If it’s at your house: – Limit guest list. – If invited by social media, set to “private.” – Lock up your alcohol.
  • If it’s not at your house: – Check with host parents about what is involved. – Set clear rules – and keep to them. – Make sure your child can get home safely.
  • prescriptions Misused by more teens than any illicit  drug except marijuana. Monitor & lock them up. Buy only what you need. Dispose unused meds.
  • over-the- counter • Monitor/measure/lock.   • Buy only what you need. • Dispose unused meds.
  • Weed is the 2nd most used drug among high school youth.
  • “But it’s natural!”
  • Impact on learning and memory Heart & respiratory problems Accidents Mental illness Addiction (9% of users)
  • Inhalants are the high of  choice for 6‐12  year olds due to  availability.
  • • Keep track of your household products. • Watch for warning signs. • Educate on no mixing of chemicals.
  • One teen in every classroom (4-6 ) already has problems with gambling Online most popular with young people Problems are connected! – Gambling connected with drinking, substance use, delinquency, & more
  • And understand that gambling is not risk-free.
  • > Keep device use in an open area, if possible. > Monitor, monitor, monitor. • Gambling, chat, parties, “how-to” videos, etc. • Ensure accounts are set to “private” or “friends” only. • Social media accounts—PASSWORD (not just “friend”)
  • Set parental controls for your wireless devices Yep, go here 2 get started: www.preventionlane.org/tech GPS, etc.? How? & check phone 2 right? Do occasional checks of their devices. Keep tabs on apps & sites. Keep them safe! Teen Proof Your Tech 10:49PM 5:11PM
  • 2/3 of all teen suicides  involve guns
  • depression
  • Suicide is the second-leading cause of death among 15-25 year old Oregonians. Psychological issues & substance abuse are the biggest factors. http://public.health.oregon.gov/DiseasesConditions/InjuryFatalityData/Documents/Suicide,%20Suicide%20Attempts,%20and%20Ideation%20among%20Adolescents%20in%20Oregon.pdf
  • Communicate. Asking them about suicide is NOT going to “give them the idea.”
  • Summing it up.
  • They need you now more than ever.
  • “teen-proof” your teen… You can set clear & stick to clear limits & expectations. You can be consistent. You can communicating with your teen, staying engaged.
  • Ask Who Where What When Listen Without judging Allow venting
  • Set a good example. (!) Pay attention to clues: restless, withdrawal, lack of interest, different friends, etc. Intervene if you see warning signs. (Get intervention tips: www.drugfree.org/intervene) Monitor Act
  • And a last reminder…
  • are the #1 influence    in your teen’s life. Image source: http://www.abc.virginia.gov/Education/underagedrinking/UnderAgeDrinking.pdf
  • preventionlane More Teen-Proof campaign resources: preventionlane preventionlane Connect: