integrating
problem
gambling
in Prevention
Julie Hynes, MA, CPS
Four Directions: Tree of Healing Conference
October 2, 201...
Please…Not one
more thing!
goals
• Why problem gambling is so important to 
address
• Give you some time tested prevention tools 
so you can use them...
First thing’s first: 
www.preventionlane.org/4directions
Creating conditions in families,
schools, and communities that
promote the wellbeing
of people.
contribute
We do a lot to try to protect young
people…
PROBLEM BEHAVIORS
Effects of Problem Gambling on
Children
“A” Unique Set of Risks
Youth
gambling is
still under
the radar.
Another
risk
factor
The PREFRONTAL
CORTEX is the
LAST PART to
develop.
years old!
The brain
is still
developing
until
•Amygdala active  
•Fight or flight, emotion
•Decision‐making altered
•More vulnerable to risk‐
taking & impulsive 
behavi...
5.6% college age (18‐24)
2½ % all adults (18+)
4% teens (13‐17)
This is the first generation of widely 
available electron...
AWARENESS (low)
2012 Oregon Student Wellness Survey, Lane County (“ESD”) and Oregon; available at 
http://oregon.pridesurv...
Targeting Parental Attitudes
Most parents believe:
• Youth gambling is harmless 
• Youth who gamble are unlikely to have 
...
ATTITUDESOregon parent/youth focus groups revealed:
All parents in their focus groups said their 
kids didn’t gamble
All o...
2012 Oregon
Student Wellness Survey (SWS)
2012 Gambling, Substance Use and Mental Health 
among Oregon Youth
0%
10%
20%
30...
Used alcohol in the past
month
3.1%
14.6%
29.5%
14.9%
30.9%
46.9%
Grade 6 Grade 8 Grade 11
Did not gamble Gambled
Binge drank in the past
month
0.5%
5.6%
16.4%
4.3%
12.7%
28.7%
Grade 6 Grade 8 Grade 11
Did not gamble Gambled
Available a...
Smoked cigarettes in the past
month
1.1%
6.2%
12.5%
5.1%
10.8%
18.7%
Grade 6 Grade 8 Grade 11
Did not gamble Gambled
Avail...
Used marijuana in the past
month
0.7%
8.3%
19.3%
4.3%
15.8%
28.4%
Grade 6 Grade 8 Grade 11
Did not gamble Gambled
Availabl...
Skipped school one or more
days in the past month
5.7%
12.8%
22.5%
15.4%
23.0%
35.4%
Grade 6 Grade 8 Grade 11
Did not gamb...
7.2%
5.0%
11.3%
9.0%
Grade 8 Grade 11
Did not gamble Gambled
Available at: www.preventionlane.org/sws.htm
Attempted suicid...
Attempted suicide in the past year
10.1%
8.0%
21.0%
18.6%
Grade 8 Grade 11
Did not bet/gamble more than wanted to
Bet/gamb...
Delinquency (physical fight in
last month)
41.80%
22.40%
Physical fight
Gambled Did not gamble
CONCLUSION?
Teens who gamble are
smoked up, toked up,
drunk emo delinquents.
CONCLUSION?
Teens who gamble are
smoked up, toked up,
drunk emo delinquents.
What do the data tell us 
about risk & youth 
gambling? How would you 
interpret the data?
delinquency
sexual
behavior
depression
substance
use
gambling
Problem
Behaviors
Conclusion: Problem Gambling
is ONE COMPON...
Protective Factors &
Gambling
60.60%
29%
65.90%
21.80%
Strong Positive Youth development Depression
Gambled Did not gamble
43.80%
32.90%
53.70%
23.20%
Likes school absenteeism
Gambled Did not gamble
Protective Factors &
Gambling
TAKING THAT…
And Using PREVENTION science
contribute
ResiliencyTheory
ADVERSE CHILDHOOD
EXPERIENCES (ACE)
40 DEVELOPMENTAL
ASSETS
SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT
STRATEGY
PROMOTIVE FACTORS...
• Similar to medical model
• Problem behaviors share common
risk factors
• Risk factors increase the chance of
behavior pr...
Risk-Focused Prevention
• Prevent problem behavior from happening:
– Identify factors that increase risk of problem and 
t...
Risk & Protective Factors
• Exposure to a greater number of risk
factors  a young person’s risk
exponentially
• Reducing ...
Risk Factors for Adolescent
Problem Behavior
Recognized Problem Behaviors
• Substance abuse
• Violence
• Delinquency
• Teenage pregnancy
• School dropout
 Problem gam...
Potential Risk Factors for Problem
Gambling
• Community:
– Availability
– Community Laws & Norms
• Family:
– Family Histor...
Source: Marotta & Hynes, 2003
Potential Risk Factors for Problem
Gambling
• School:
– Anti‐Social behavior
• Individual/Pe...
 Being male, older teen
 Single‐parent household
 Gambling on 
cards/sports
 Lower household income
 Competitive
 Ha...
Protective Factors: Characteristics
• Individual Characteristics:
– Gender
– Resilient Temperament
– Positive Social Orien...
“The earlier people begin
gambling, the more likely
they are to experience
problems from gambling.”
- National Academy of ...
By creating nurturing
environments using
EVIDENCE-BASED
PREVENTION PRACTICES
NOW:
PREVENTION in action
Common Goals
“Denormalization”
Prevention
Protection
Harm Reduction
using our
evidence base
Follow-up link: best practices
http://preventionlane.org/best-practices.htm
Find a
focus (or
two)
• Public awareness
• Policy
• School‐based 
curriculum
• Parent education
The right support to the
right people
Ideally, we would have varying levels of 
support to meet the needs of diverse 
yout...
 Information
Dissemination
 Prevention Education
 Alternative Activities
 Community-Based
Processes
 Problem
Identifi...
Prevention Efforts:
Shared Environments
• Information Dissemination: moving 
readiness… first step is to acknowledge 
ther...
Prevention Efforts: Individualized
Environments
• Identification & referral
• Problem gambling  ‐ LIE‐BET (see 
www.preven...
SPECIFIC 
examples
 Information
Dissemination
 Prevention Education
 Alternative Activities
 Community-Based
Processes...
Peer to Peer Campaign
Video Contest & Art Search
• Cheap
• Great for integration in schools where health 
curriculum not a possibility
• Ask med...
Social Media
• Websites, Blogs, Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, 
etc.
• Fairly inexpensive & easy to update!
SPECIFIC 
examples
 Information
Dissemination
 Prevention Education
 Alternative Activities
 Community-Based
Processes...
Department of Education
• Exhibiting and presenting at school teacher 
trainings
• ODE health education standards now 
inc...
Partnering with schools
• Casino night alternatives
• Parenting programs (e.g., Strengthening Families)
• Selective preven...
•Refusal skills
•Media advocacy
•Decision making
This is an ADD-IN to other
material; addictions
prevention curricula
• 1 in 175
• 1 in 175,000
• 1 in 175 million
• 1 in 175 billion
1 in 175 Million
(174,233,510)
Odds of getting struck by lightning:
1 in 280,000
Name at least 2
consequences that
someone may experience
due to his/her gambling
problem
• Debt
• Crime
• Depression/Suicide
• Relationship problems
• Employment problems
• Alcohol and/or drug problems
Use Your Area’s Existing Best
Practice Curricula…add in
language!
• Project Northland
• Life Skills
• Project Alert
• Stre...
SPECIFIC 
examples
 Information
Dissemination
 Prevention Education
 Alternative Activities
 Community-Based
Processes...
Casino night alternatives, art
projects, etc.
SPECIFIC 
examples
 Information
Dissemination
 Prevention Education
 Alternative Activities
 Community-Based
Processes...
Coalitions:
Giving People
A Voice
• Youth coalitions
• Integrating in your 
prevention coalition
• Specific problem 
gambl...
SPECIFIC 
examples
 Information
Dissemination
 Prevention Education
 Alternative Activities
 Community-Based
Processes...
Screening & Assessment Tools
• Lie/Bet
• South Oaks Gambling Screen (SOGS)
• DSM‐V criteria
• National Opinion Diagnostic ...
Screening Techniques
• Add to SBIRT (Screening, Brief 
Intervention, & Referral to Treatment) ‐
SAMHSA
• Community health ...
SPECIFIC 
examples
 Information
Dissemination
 Prevention Education
 Alternative Activities
 Community-Based
Processes...
Reward and Reminders
Lottery Scratch Tickets
Thanks to Shawn Martinez of Josephine County, Oregon
Evidence‐Based Strategy ...
CONDUCTING REWARD AND
REMINDER VISITS
•Student/ Parent  training
•Parent and Student consent 
form signed and returned
•Pr...
Clerk Sales
• Students only have one dollar in cash with them and ID
• Two students enter store with adult advisor followi...
Clerk Sales
• Never lie
• If they are in a tough situation leave the 
store
• If student is uncomfortable for any reason –...
JUST A REMINDER!
One in every 25 Oregon teens (13‐17 year olds) is a problem or at risk 
gambler– that’s more than 10,000 ...
Yay!... The Reward
• GIFT CARD (coffee, pizza, movie ticket)
• T‐shirt
• Coffee Mug
• Keychain
• Pencil / Pen
Vending Machine
• Students only have one dollar in cash with them and 
ID
• Two students enter store with adult advisor fo...
Vending Machine
• Never lie
• If they are in a tough situation leave the 
store
• If student is uncomfortable for any reas...
FOLLOW UP AFTER VISITS
• Letter to store owner manager
– Congratulation s
– Regretfully 
– Information to share with emplo...
Observations
• Youth felt some of the vending machine were in 
hidden areas or not in sight of any employees to 
monitor. ...
Instant Ticket Vending Machine
(ITVM)
Lottery ticket machine 
(RIGHT)  is out of 
sight of cashier, 
whereas movie 
machin...
 Information
Dissemination
 Prevention Education
 Alternative Activities
 Community-Based
Processes
 Problem
Identifi...
right path
System Evaluation Results
Prevention and outreach are working:
• Evaluation report in Oregon shows many 
successes; see 
h...
Evidence-based prevention
programs save money
• On average, for every dollar invested in 
these evidence‐based prevention ...
Youthful subject
Perception of 
harmlessness
Stigma/shame
Industry
KEY challenges
Gratuitous pic of my kid
Successes… &
Challenges
• Approaching 
schools/coalitions with 
internal partners
• Sharing how this BENEFITS 
them, not a...
Where can I find these
materials?
www.problemgamblingprevention.org
and www.preventionlane.org
RECAP
MORE
RESOURCES
Excellent WA prevention resource:
evergreencpg.org
Info & general prevention
resource:
preventionlane.org/gambling
Curriculum, outreach resource:
problemgamblingprevention.org
Data & Info
• Updated annually
• Contains facts and figures, 
factsheets, overviews, 
templates, etc. for increasing 
awar...
The Take-Home
• Integration is needed in today’s world
• Don’t overcomplicate it
• Use tools available to you with the tim...
541.682.3928
For more info & resources,
visit www.preventionlane.org
hynes@uoregon.edu julhynes1
I can't fit one more thing on my plate! Infusing problem gambling prevention into other prevention efforts
I can't fit one more thing on my plate! Infusing problem gambling prevention into other prevention efforts
I can't fit one more thing on my plate! Infusing problem gambling prevention into other prevention efforts
I can't fit one more thing on my plate! Infusing problem gambling prevention into other prevention efforts
I can't fit one more thing on my plate! Infusing problem gambling prevention into other prevention efforts
I can't fit one more thing on my plate! Infusing problem gambling prevention into other prevention efforts
I can't fit one more thing on my plate! Infusing problem gambling prevention into other prevention efforts
I can't fit one more thing on my plate! Infusing problem gambling prevention into other prevention efforts
I can't fit one more thing on my plate! Infusing problem gambling prevention into other prevention efforts
I can't fit one more thing on my plate! Infusing problem gambling prevention into other prevention efforts
I can't fit one more thing on my plate! Infusing problem gambling prevention into other prevention efforts
I can't fit one more thing on my plate! Infusing problem gambling prevention into other prevention efforts
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I can't fit one more thing on my plate! Infusing problem gambling prevention into other prevention efforts

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Presented by Julie Hynes, MA, CPS at the Four Directions: Tree of Healing Conference.
October 2, 2013. www.preventionlane.org

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I can't fit one more thing on my plate! Infusing problem gambling prevention into other prevention efforts

  1. 1. integrating problem gambling in Prevention Julie Hynes, MA, CPS Four Directions: Tree of Healing Conference October 2, 2013 
  2. 2. Please…Not one more thing!
  3. 3. goals • Why problem gambling is so important to  address • Give you some time tested prevention tools  so you can use them where you work • Save you from reinventing the wheel • Encourage you to share whatever you come  up with as well!
  4. 4. First thing’s first:  www.preventionlane.org/4directions
  5. 5. Creating conditions in families, schools, and communities that promote the wellbeing of people.
  6. 6. contribute
  7. 7. We do a lot to try to protect young people…
  8. 8. PROBLEM BEHAVIORS
  9. 9. Effects of Problem Gambling on Children
  10. 10. “A” Unique Set of Risks Youth gambling is still under the radar.
  11. 11. Another risk factor
  12. 12. The PREFRONTAL CORTEX is the LAST PART to develop. years old! The brain is still developing until
  13. 13. •Amygdala active   •Fight or flight, emotion •Decision‐making altered •More vulnerable to risk‐ taking & impulsive  behaviors Source: Ramoski, S., Nystrom, R. (2007).  “The adolescent brain is especially sensitive to the effects of dopamine.
  14. 14. 5.6% college age (18‐24) 2½ % all adults (18+) 4% teens (13‐17) This is the first generation of widely  available electronic gambling.  We really don’t know the effects yet. Why? Is it the generation? Technology? Or what?
  15. 15. AWARENESS (low) 2012 Oregon Student Wellness Survey, Lane County (“ESD”) and Oregon; available at  http://oregon.pridesurveys.com/esds.php?year=2011
  16. 16. Targeting Parental Attitudes Most parents believe: • Youth gambling is harmless  • Youth who gamble are unlikely to have  problems in school • Youth gambling is not associated with alcohol  or drug use …and those beliefs are part of the problem
  17. 17. ATTITUDESOregon parent/youth focus groups revealed: All parents in their focus groups said their  kids didn’t gamble All of their kids, who were in their own focus  groups, said they did gamble Neither sees gambling as risky
  18. 18. 2012 Oregon Student Wellness Survey (SWS) 2012 Gambling, Substance Use and Mental Health  among Oregon Youth 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% Gambling Alcohol Binge Alcohol Marijuana CigarettesDepression Psych distress Percentage 6th 8th 11th Source: http://oregon.pridesurveys.com/esds.php?year=2011 n=55,611 students (18,885 6th grade; 21,368 8th grade; 15,358 11th grade) 
  19. 19. Used alcohol in the past month 3.1% 14.6% 29.5% 14.9% 30.9% 46.9% Grade 6 Grade 8 Grade 11 Did not gamble Gambled
  20. 20. Binge drank in the past month 0.5% 5.6% 16.4% 4.3% 12.7% 28.7% Grade 6 Grade 8 Grade 11 Did not gamble Gambled Available at: www.preventionlane.org/sws.htm
  21. 21. Smoked cigarettes in the past month 1.1% 6.2% 12.5% 5.1% 10.8% 18.7% Grade 6 Grade 8 Grade 11 Did not gamble Gambled Available at: www.preventionlane.org/sws.htm
  22. 22. Used marijuana in the past month 0.7% 8.3% 19.3% 4.3% 15.8% 28.4% Grade 6 Grade 8 Grade 11 Did not gamble Gambled Available at: www.preventionlane.org/sws.htm
  23. 23. Skipped school one or more days in the past month 5.7% 12.8% 22.5% 15.4% 23.0% 35.4% Grade 6 Grade 8 Grade 11 Did not gamble Gambled Available at: www.preventionlane.org/sws.htm
  24. 24. 7.2% 5.0% 11.3% 9.0% Grade 8 Grade 11 Did not gamble Gambled Available at: www.preventionlane.org/sws.htm Attempted suicide in the past year
  25. 25. Attempted suicide in the past year 10.1% 8.0% 21.0% 18.6% Grade 8 Grade 11 Did not bet/gamble more than wanted to Bet/gambled more than wanted to
  26. 26. Delinquency (physical fight in last month) 41.80% 22.40% Physical fight Gambled Did not gamble
  27. 27. CONCLUSION? Teens who gamble are smoked up, toked up, drunk emo delinquents.
  28. 28. CONCLUSION? Teens who gamble are smoked up, toked up, drunk emo delinquents.
  29. 29. What do the data tell us  about risk & youth  gambling? How would you  interpret the data?
  30. 30. delinquency sexual behavior depression substance use gambling Problem Behaviors Conclusion: Problem Gambling is ONE COMPONENT of Problem Behaviors
  31. 31. Protective Factors & Gambling 60.60% 29% 65.90% 21.80% Strong Positive Youth development Depression Gambled Did not gamble
  32. 32. 43.80% 32.90% 53.70% 23.20% Likes school absenteeism Gambled Did not gamble Protective Factors & Gambling
  33. 33. TAKING THAT… And Using PREVENTION science
  34. 34. contribute
  35. 35. ResiliencyTheory ADVERSE CHILDHOOD EXPERIENCES (ACE) 40 DEVELOPMENTAL ASSETS SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY PROMOTIVE FACTORS Risk & Protective Factor Theory
  36. 36. • Similar to medical model • Problem behaviors share common risk factors • Risk factors increase the chance of behavior problems • Protective factors can help buffer the effects of risk factors The Risk Factor/Protective Factor Theory
  37. 37. Risk-Focused Prevention • Prevent problem behavior from happening: – Identify factors that increase risk of problem and  then find ways to reduce those risks – Enhance protective/resiliency factors • 30+ years of research: Hawkins, Catalano &  other researchers • Four Domains:  – Community ‐‐ Family – School ‐‐ Individual/Peer
  38. 38. Risk & Protective Factors • Exposure to a greater number of risk factors  a young person’s risk exponentially • Reducing or eliminating even a few risk factors may significantly  risk for youth • Protective factors buffer exposure to risk • Protective factors build on strengths of individual, family, community
  39. 39. Risk Factors for Adolescent Problem Behavior
  40. 40. Recognized Problem Behaviors • Substance abuse • Violence • Delinquency • Teenage pregnancy • School dropout  Problem gambling?? – Apparently similar risk factors – Very high co-occurrence between problem gambling & other problem behaviors, especially alcohol/substance abuse
  41. 41. Potential Risk Factors for Problem Gambling • Community: – Availability – Community Laws & Norms • Family: – Family History – Family Conflict (competition) – Parental Attitudes/Involvement Source: Marotta & Hynes, 2003
  42. 42. Source: Marotta & Hynes, 2003 Potential Risk Factors for Problem Gambling • School: – Anti‐Social behavior • Individual/Peer: – Peer Involvement – Favorable Attitudes – Early Initiation  – Constitutional
  43. 43.  Being male, older teen  Single‐parent household  Gambling on  cards/sports  Lower household income  Competitive  Having lost more than  $50 in a single month Started gambling before  8th grade  Parents who are  alcohol/substance  abusers  Parents who gamble* Source: Volberg, et al (2008; bid). Key risk factors for YOUTH: * Youth are TWICE as likely to be at-risk gamblers & FOUR TIMES as likely to be PROBLEM GAMBLERS.
  44. 44. Protective Factors: Characteristics • Individual Characteristics: – Gender – Resilient Temperament – Positive Social Orientation – Intelligence • Protective Processes: – Opportunities for involvement – Social and cognitive skills – Recognition Dickson, Derevensky & Gupta, 2002
  45. 45. “The earlier people begin gambling, the more likely they are to experience problems from gambling.” - National Academy of Sciences
  46. 46. By creating nurturing environments using EVIDENCE-BASED PREVENTION PRACTICES
  47. 47. NOW: PREVENTION in action
  48. 48. Common Goals “Denormalization” Prevention Protection Harm Reduction using our evidence base
  49. 49. Follow-up link: best practices http://preventionlane.org/best-practices.htm
  50. 50. Find a focus (or two) • Public awareness • Policy • School‐based  curriculum • Parent education
  51. 51. The right support to the right people Ideally, we would have varying levels of  support to meet the needs of diverse  youth and their families. Size of population affected More intensive for at‐risk youth  and families ~15% Most intensive interventions for the  youth and families at highest risk ~10% Universal supports for all youth and families ~75%
  52. 52.  Information Dissemination  Prevention Education  Alternative Activities  Community-Based Processes  Problem Identification/ Referral  Environmental/Policy Approaches A Common Approach: Uses the Center  for Substance  Abuse Prevention  Strategies for  Effective  Prevention
  53. 53. Prevention Efforts: Shared Environments • Information Dissemination: moving  readiness… first step is to acknowledge  there’s an issue! • Community‐based prevention coalitions – Communities that Care  • Norms, Policies & Law – Social Host Ordinance – Gambling 
  54. 54. Prevention Efforts: Individualized Environments • Identification & referral • Problem gambling  ‐ LIE‐BET (see  www.preventionlane.org/lie‐bet) • School‐based prevention • Reconnecting Youth • RESPONSE (H.S. suicide prevention) • Problem gambling integration with  ATOD curricula • Family support • Evidence‐based parenting classes 
  55. 55. SPECIFIC  examples  Information Dissemination  Prevention Education  Alternative Activities  Community-Based Processes  Problem Identification/ Referral  Environmental/Policy Approaches
  56. 56. Peer to Peer Campaign
  57. 57. Video Contest & Art Search • Cheap • Great for integration in schools where health  curriculum not a possibility • Ask media, A/V, drama teachers about participating • See http://preventionlane.org/videos.htm and  http://preventionlane.org/gambling/art‐ search.htm  for more information
  58. 58. Social Media • Websites, Blogs, Facebook, YouTube, Twitter,  etc. • Fairly inexpensive & easy to update!
  59. 59. SPECIFIC  examples  Information Dissemination  Prevention Education  Alternative Activities  Community-Based Processes  Problem Identification/ Referral  Environmental/Policy Approaches
  60. 60. Department of Education • Exhibiting and presenting at school teacher  trainings • ODE health education standards now  includes problem gambling at 6‐8th grade  level Above: see http://preventionlane.org/gambling/about-us.htm for complete chart & information CSAP: Policy
  61. 61. Partnering with schools • Casino night alternatives • Parenting programs (e.g., Strengthening Families) • Selective prevention programs (e.g., Reconnecting  Youth) • Adding language about gambling into any drug or  alcohol curriculum • In‐class presentations that can fold in with problem  gambling • Sample policies (see student handbooks) CSAP: Info dissemination, policy, community process,  education, ID & referral (possibly alternative activities)
  62. 62. •Refusal skills •Media advocacy •Decision making This is an ADD-IN to other material; addictions prevention curricula
  63. 63. • 1 in 175 • 1 in 175,000 • 1 in 175 million • 1 in 175 billion
  64. 64. 1 in 175 Million (174,233,510) Odds of getting struck by lightning: 1 in 280,000
  65. 65. Name at least 2 consequences that someone may experience due to his/her gambling problem
  66. 66. • Debt • Crime • Depression/Suicide • Relationship problems • Employment problems • Alcohol and/or drug problems
  67. 67. Use Your Area’s Existing Best Practice Curricula…add in language! • Project Northland • Life Skills • Project Alert • Strengthening Families 10‐14 • Etc…   again, add in the language or tools  here.
  68. 68. SPECIFIC  examples  Information Dissemination  Prevention Education  Alternative Activities  Community-Based Processes  Problem Identification/ Referral  Environmental/Policy Approaches
  69. 69. Casino night alternatives, art projects, etc.
  70. 70. SPECIFIC  examples  Information Dissemination  Prevention Education  Alternative Activities  Community-Based Processes  Problem Identification/ Referral  Environmental/Policy Approaches
  71. 71. Coalitions: Giving People A Voice • Youth coalitions • Integrating in your  prevention coalition • Specific problem  gambling coalitions • Social media can be  part of that!
  72. 72. SPECIFIC  examples  Information Dissemination  Prevention Education  Alternative Activities  Community-Based Processes  Problem Identification/ Referral  Environmental/Policy Approaches
  73. 73. Screening & Assessment Tools • Lie/Bet • South Oaks Gambling Screen (SOGS) • DSM‐V criteria • National Opinion Diagnostic Summary  (NODS) • GA/Gam‐Anon 20 Questions The above tools are available online at  http://npgaw.org/tools/screeningtools.asp
  74. 74. Screening Techniques • Add to SBIRT (Screening, Brief  Intervention, & Referral to Treatment) ‐ SAMHSA • Community health centers • Partner with AOD treatment providers
  75. 75. SPECIFIC  examples  Information Dissemination  Prevention Education  Alternative Activities  Community-Based Processes  Problem Identification/ Referral  Environmental/Policy Approaches
  76. 76. Reward and Reminders Lottery Scratch Tickets Thanks to Shawn Martinez of Josephine County, Oregon Evidence‐Based Strategy effectively  used for Alcohol and Tobacco  retailers, many of whom are lottery  retailers as well.  
  77. 77. CONDUCTING REWARD AND REMINDER VISITS •Student/ Parent  training •Parent and Student consent  form signed and returned •Practice
  78. 78. Clerk Sales • Students only have one dollar in cash with them and ID • Two students enter store with adult advisor following  behind • One student picks up an item that is $1 of less • At counter student ask for scratch ticket.  At no time does  the student pick up the ticket • If the clerk gets the ticket, totals the sale and asks for money  student say they don’t have enough money, pays for item  and the second student reminds them that lottery tickets  cannot be purchased by anyone under the age of 18 • If the clerk asks for ID, show it • If the clerk does not sell, give them their reward and thank  the clerk for not selling
  79. 79. Clerk Sales • Never lie • If they are in a tough situation leave the  store • If student is uncomfortable for any reason – leave • The students fill out the data form with  information from the visit
  80. 80. JUST A REMINDER! One in every 25 Oregon teens (13‐17 year olds) is a problem or at risk  gambler– that’s more than 10,000 Oregon teens. REMEMBER ORS 461.600 Sales to minors. (1) Tickets or shares in lottery games,  including tickets or shares sold from vending machines or other devices,  may not be sold to a person under 18 years of age. ORS 461.300 Selection of retailers; rules; contracts (4) The director may  terminate a contract with a lottery game retailer based on the grounds  for termination included in the contract or commission rules governing  the contract. The grounds for termination must include, but are not  limited to, the knowing sale of lottery tickets or shares to any person  under the age of 18 years or knowingly permitting a person under the  age of 21 years to operate a video lottery game terminal. Uh-oh! … Reminder Slip
  81. 81. Yay!... The Reward • GIFT CARD (coffee, pizza, movie ticket) • T‐shirt • Coffee Mug • Keychain • Pencil / Pen
  82. 82. Vending Machine • Students only have one dollar in cash with them and  ID • Two students enter store with adult advisor following  behind • One student locates the vending machine • One of the students put $1 in machine • Students may not lie if asked age or date of birth • Second student is just observing employees or others  in store • If the machine sells a ticket to student it is handed to  the adult
  83. 83. Vending Machine • Never lie • If they are in a tough situation leave the  store • If student is uncomfortable for any reason  – leave • The students fill out the data form with  information from the visit
  84. 84. FOLLOW UP AFTER VISITS • Letter to store owner manager – Congratulation s – Regretfully  – Information to share with employees  • Any scratch tickets purchased are sent to  State Lottery Commission
  85. 85. Observations • Youth felt some of the vending machine were in  hidden areas or not in sight of any employees to  monitor.   • Youth felt if someone wanted a ticket they could  push the button that says they are over 18.   • Some of the machines were by customer service  and when they put money into the machine or  was looking at the machine with employees or  other adults close by no one said anything to  the youth.
  86. 86. Instant Ticket Vending Machine (ITVM) Lottery ticket machine  (RIGHT)  is out of  sight of cashier,  whereas movie  machine (LEFT) is in  sight Placement of Lottery  machine next to  movie machine  draws kids’ interest
  87. 87.  Information Dissemination  Prevention Education  Alternative Activities  Community-Based Processes  Problem Identification/ Referral  Environmental/Policy Approaches WHEW…OK. BUT WHAT ARE ALL THE
  88. 88. right path
  89. 89. System Evaluation Results Prevention and outreach are working: • Evaluation report in Oregon shows many  successes; see  http://problemgamblingprevention.org/reports/08‐09‐AD80‐Annual‐ Reports‐Summary.pdf for more complete report • Oregon is one of the few states that appears to have averted a  significant increase in problem gambling prevalence while  expanding legalized gambling (National Center For the Study of Gambling,  2006) 1. Moore & Marotta, in press 2. National Center For the Study of Gambling, 2006.
  90. 90. Evidence-based prevention programs save money • On average, for every dollar invested in  these evidence‐based prevention programs  nationwide… – $6 was saved with Project Alert – $8 was saved with Adolescent Transitions  Program – $11 was saved with Strengthening Families 10‐ 14 – $35 was saved with Good Behavior Game
  91. 91. Youthful subject Perception of  harmlessness Stigma/shame Industry KEY challenges Gratuitous pic of my kid
  92. 92. Successes… & Challenges • Approaching  schools/coalitions with  internal partners • Sharing how this BENEFITS  them, not adds work • Using “Why should you care?”  message • Using local data • Knowing the language     (e.g.,  education standards) • Asking questions • Gambling still not on radar • Lack of resources & time • Strict curriculum demands
  93. 93. Where can I find these materials? www.problemgamblingprevention.org
  94. 94. and www.preventionlane.org
  95. 95. RECAP
  96. 96. MORE RESOURCES
  97. 97. Excellent WA prevention resource: evergreencpg.org
  98. 98. Info & general prevention resource: preventionlane.org/gambling
  99. 99. Curriculum, outreach resource: problemgamblingprevention.org
  100. 100. Data & Info • Updated annually • Contains facts and figures,  factsheets, overviews,  templates, etc. for increasing  awareness of problem gambling    • Can be downloaded at  http://problemgamblingprev ention.org/
  101. 101. The Take-Home • Integration is needed in today’s world • Don’t overcomplicate it • Use tools available to you with the time  you have • Ask for help! Problem gambling experts  love to help.
  102. 102. 541.682.3928 For more info & resources, visit www.preventionlane.org hynes@uoregon.edu julhynes1
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