2010 Oregon Student Wellness Survey, Youth Gambling

  • 1,277 views
Uploaded on

Oregon’s 2010 student survey reached over 52,000 youth in grades 6, 8 and 11; this covered 35 counties and 6 tribes. The survey results, questions and background are posted at …

Oregon’s 2010 student survey reached over 52,000 youth in grades 6, 8 and 11; this covered 35 counties and 6 tribes. The survey results, questions and background are posted at http://www.oregon.gov/DHS/addiction/student-wellness/index.shtml. In addition to the overall state data, there are individual county and other reports available. After the overall results were disseminated, we asked for special crosstabulations between youth gambling and other behaviors and those results are in the slides which follow. These data are not routinely included in the posted reports, so we rely on you at the local level to disseminate this important information on youth gambling.

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
1,277
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2

Actions

Shares
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • Oregon’s 2010 student survey reached over 52,000 youth in grades 6, 8 and 11; this covered 35 counties and 6 tribes. The survey results, questions and background are posted at http://www.oregon.gov/DHS/addiction/student-wellness/index.shtml . In addition to the overall state data, there are individual county and other reports available. After the overall results were disseminated, we asked for special crosstabulations between youth gambling and other behaviors and those results are in the slides which follow. These data are not routinely included in the posted reports, so we rely on you at the local level to disseminate this important information on youth gambling.
  • This slide, from the statewide report, shows that over 38% of sixth graders report that they have gambled in the past 30 days. It also shows the types of games they are most likely to play: betting on games of personal skill (betting on shooting hoops, for example), betting on sports teams, playing cards, and betting on dice or coin flips are the most common forms of gambling in 6 th grade.
  • This data is also from the statewide report and shows that over 45% of 8 th graders reported gambling in the past 30 days—a significant increase over the rate reported among 6 th graders. The most common types of gambling included: games of personal skill, playing cards, betting on sports teams, dice and coin flips.
  • These data, also from the statewide report, show that slightly over 38% of 11 th graders reported gambling in the past 30 days. The top 5 preferred games remains relatively similar to what was reported in 6 th and 8 th grade, although there is some variation between games.
  • Here we see the statewide summary of the types of gambling reported in the past 30 days according to grade level.
  • This graph shows youth expenditures on gambling (6 th graders were not asked this question). While the issue of large expenditures has never been the key concern when we talk about youth gambling (the fact that they’re doing it at all and without guidance is the chief concern), it is interesting to note that over 5% of 8 th and 11 th graders reported spending over $50 on gambling.
  • This chart shows statewide data on signs of problem gambling reported by Oregon youth. The last two questions are from a valid and reliable instrument called the “Lie-Bet”; answering yes to either question is a sign of the need for further assessment and evaluation of a possible gambling problem.
  • This slide is a graphic depiction of the previous chart.
  • This table shows whether youth have had parents or teachers discuss the risks of gambling with them. These rates are significantly lower than discussions by parents or teachers of the risks of other behaviors, such as alcohol and tobacco use. We know from other surveys that most parents (and probably most teachers) do not view youth gambling as a risky activity—in fact, some of them see it as a healthy alternative to other risk behaviors, which we will soon see via other graphs is not the case.
  • This graph shows that gambling is the most commonly risk behavior among youth in Oregon, yet it is not on the radar screen of most people. Often teachers or parents will say “we just don’t see it”, when problem gambling prevention talks address this issue—even though they don’t see it, it is clearly happening and generally without guidance or parameters set by parents, teachers or others.
  • Many of the risk behaviors of concern are decreasing over time, while youth gambling is significantly increasing. More attention needs to be paid to this important and emerging risk behavior, particularly when you view it in terms of the correlation between youth gambling and these other, more well known, behaviors—the next series of slides will shed some light on this.
  • Overall, youth gambling rates are higher among Oregon’s non-White populations. Reports on each ethnic group are available at http://www.oregon.gov/DHS/addiction/student-wellness/reports.shtml
  • This is the first in a series of slides which graphically illustrates why youth gambling needs to be given more attention, and why it should be included in prevention efforts aimed at other risk behaviors. Youth who gamble have much higher rates of alcohol use than those who do not gamble. These correlations have held consistent over the past several years of data collection, regardless of the particular survey used, and are also consistent with data on the national level.
  • Again, youth who gamble had much higher rates of binge drinking in the past 30 days than youth who did not gamble. We know there is not a direct cause-and-effect relationship here (ie gambling does not cause binge drinking, nor vice versa), but there is a very strong correlation. So if we want to address binge drinking and we ignore gambling, we are missing the boat on really helping kids.
  • Here we see the same pattern with youth gambling and smoking…..
  • And a similar pattern with youth gambling and marijuana use….
  • And a similar pattern with youth gambling and skipping school…
  • Youth gambling also correlates to depression…
  • Youth who gambled were more likely to report having attempted suicide in the past year than youth who did not gamble.
  • Youth who reported gambling more than they wanted to (a possible sign of a gambling problem) also reported higher rates of having attempted suicide in the past year than students who did not bet more than they wanted to.
  • Clearly, then, youth gambling must be addressed in the context of how it exists in the lives of youth—one of several possible risky behaviors they may try, which can lead to serious problems. The difference is that, in real life, youth gambling is the one that is routinely left off of this diagram. We need to change that for the sake of our kids, who are the first generation to grow up with gambling being the norm, being easily accessible and available, being shown as glamorous and not being discussed enough by parents and other authority figures.
  • These data are not routinely published, so we rely on you to share this important information on the local level. We will continue to share it at the State level as well with important partners.
  • Supplemental slides follow—use any or all that you choose.
  • Most Oregonians don’t know that, despite our small size, we are among the leaders in the nation for types of and access to gambling…this is the environment in which our kids are growing up. On the positive side, we are also a national leader in prevention and treatment efforts.
  • Here is a definition of gambling…and it’s important, with kids, how you ask about gambling……if you ask kids if they gamble, they’ll say “no”….if you ask them if they “bet money on ….” they will say yes. It’s also important to let them know that what they’re “spending” may not be money, but things as important—like their time, attention, emotion, etc.
  • Youth prevalence studies in Oregon tell us that already one child per classroom would meet the criteria for a diagnosable gambling problem, yet still it remains a hidden problem.
  • Adolescent brains are a perfect environment for gambling—the judgement part of the brain isn’t engaged, and the risk-taking, stimulation-seeking part is...and that’s what gambling is all about
  • There is no balance to the messages kids are getting about gambling…it is glamorized on TV (it’s a sport on ESPN), gambling routinely happens in schools, churches, etc…it’s marketed to kids even including online pop ups inviting them to gambling sites. Who’s telling kids about the possible risks of gambling, up to and including that people become addicted to it? And if we say nothing, what is the message that we are sending to our kids?
  • Focus groups in Oregon revealed that parents are not aware of the extent to which their kids are involved in gambling…and even if they know about it, they generally don’t consider it to be risky…some consider it a healthy alternative to other things which kids could be doing….the data paints a much different picture and parents need to know that gambling correlates with many of the behaviors they don’t want their kids to engage in.
  • We need to share our data and show parents that they need to talk about this issue with their kids. We have many resources available to help them with that, as well as resources to help someone who has a gambling problem: calling 1-877-mylimit or going to 1877mylimit.org is the first step
  • All kids should know about the risks of gambling and some need even more focus—this slide lists the kids who we know, from the latest research, are at the greatest risk of developing gambling problems.

Transcript

  • 1. 2010 OREGON STUDENT WELLNESS SURVEY DATA Youth gambling
  • 2. http://www.oregon.gov/DHS/addiction/student-wellness/index.shtml
  • 3.  
  • 4.  
  • 5.  
  • 6.  
  • 7.  
  • 8.  
  • 9.  
  • 10.  
  • 11. Past 30 day activities
  • 12. What’s increasing the most?
  • 13. Youth gambling and ethnicity
  • 14. Youth gambling and alcohol use
  • 15. Youth gambling and binge drinking
  • 16. Youth gambling and smoking
  • 17. Youth gambling and marijuana
  • 18. Youth gambling and skipping school
  • 19. Youth gambling and depression
  • 20. Youth gambling and suicide attempts
  • 21. Youth gambling and suicide attempts
  • 22. Youth Problem Gambling: One Component of Problem Behaviors delinquency sexual behavior smoking drug use gambling Problem Behaviors
  • 23. Please share this data with:
    • Parent groups
    • Teachers
    • Community coalitions
    • Your own staff and colleagues
    • CCF/LADPC/etc
  • 24. Other recommended slides follow….
  • 25. Oregon Gambling: Summarized
    • Oregon has more forms of legalized gambling and offers easier access to gambling than almost any other state
    • - AND -
    • Oregon is a nationally recognized leader in prevention, harm reduction and treatment for gambling problems
    Source: National Ctr for the Study of Gambling, 2006
  • 26.
    • Gambling is:
    • Betting something of value on an event with an uncertain outcome
    • Something of value can be money, time, emotion, etc.
  • 27. … that’s 1 per classroom, yet it’s generally not addressed in schools In Oregon, 1 in 25 youth meets the criteria for problem gambling
  • 28.
      • Preference for new, exciting,
      • low effort activities
      • Minimal consideration of
      • negative consequences
      • More risky, impulsive
      • all of which can play into
      • gambling problems
    Adolescent Brains Are A Work In Progress
  • 29. Messages to kids about gambling: positive, fun, a way to make money, everyone does it….where’s the balance??
  • 30.
    • Parental attitudes
    • Oregon parent/youth focus
    • groups revealed:
      • All parents in the groups said their kids didn’t gamble
      • All kids in the groups said they did gamble
      • Neither sees gambling as risky
  • 31.
    • Most parents believe:
    • Youth gambling is harmless
    • Youth who gamble are unlikely to have problems in school
    • Youth gambling is not associated with alcohol or drug use
    • … and those beliefs are part of the problem
  • 32.
    • Alternative high schools
    • School counselors
    • At risk youth programs
    • Youth detention facilities
    • Adolescent addiction treatment
    • School sports
    Targeting those at highest risk