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Understanding the wealth-creating potential of relationships :: Kredible.net workshop, October 2013, Stanford University
 

Understanding the wealth-creating potential of relationships :: Kredible.net workshop, October 2013, Stanford University

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Kaisa Still, VTT and Jukka Huhtamäki, TUT. Presented at Understanding the wealth-creating potential of relationships :: Kredible.net workshop, October 2013, Stanford University. ...

Kaisa Still, VTT and Jukka Huhtamäki, TUT. Presented at Understanding the wealth-creating potential of relationships :: Kredible.net workshop, October 2013, Stanford University.

http://kredible.net/in/second-kredible-net-workshop-stanford-university/

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  • Tangible vs. intangiblephenomenonLimited data vs. big dataSingle metrics vs. fluid, compositemetrics
  • Digital platforms for collaboration and co-creation produce massive amounts of digital traces on people and their social behavior, as company founders, entrepreneurs, investors, journalists, policy makers and customers share information, discuss and communicate about their needs, experiences and opinions using social media of “classical” measurements, such as size, density, number of components, degree, betweenness centrality and clustering co-efficient) visualizations that enable “seeing” or “revealing” the context. SNA Degree: Change in the degree is reflective of the number of new connections a firm has gained or established, is the simplest metric for node centrality-- gains in degree indicate new collaboration venues and access to resourcesBetweenness centrality: Change in betweenness centrality measure is reflective of the positional prominence of an actor in a network; shows that it has a connecting role as bridge between the different parts of the overall network-- gains in betweenness centrality indicate becoming a key collaborator in its network, allowing for access to novel resources

Understanding the wealth-creating potential of relationships :: Kredible.net workshop, October 2013, Stanford University Understanding the wealth-creating potential of relationships :: Kredible.net workshop, October 2013, Stanford University Presentation Transcript

  • Kredible.net workshop, Stanford Oct 2014: Understanding how knowledge and trust, online collaboration, roles, and credibility emerge in social media Understanding the wealth-creating potential of relationships: beyond the pretty pictures based on ”fluff” of the Internet Dr Kaisa Still, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Jukka Huhtamäki, Tampere University of Technology
  • Background- we are connected Company& Publica,ons( Patents( Higher&& Educa6on& Research(project( Acquisi,on( Deal( Research(project( (((((((((((((((((((((((((Alliance( Company& People& •  •  Employee((((Execu,ve( Advisor((((Founder( Investor((((Referrer( Investment( Angel( Financing& 3+ years of exploring ecosystemic nature of innovation & the role of relationships as conduits for talent, information and financial resources (conference papers and journal articles) Case studies of innovation ecosystems Using social network analysis (SNA) and network visualizations to explain the relationships/connections/interactions in a concrete/ explicit way shown to be useful and valuable
  • IMPORTANCE OF LINKAGES Recognizing the sources for transfers of knowledge and technology “The innovative activities of a firm partly depend on the variety and structure of its links to sources of information, knowledge, technologies, practices and human and financial resources.”
  • Relational capital Traditional approaches very limited in their power or explaining the wealth-creating potential of collaboration, which we think needs to be made explicit with relationships, connections and their interactions.
  • Social capital and relational capital
  • OUR DATA-DRIVEN APPROACH For bringing out insights on the networked innovation: The skeleton of the ecosystem, the roles of individual actors Still, K. Huhtamäki, J., Russell, M., Basole, R. & Rubens, N. 2013. Networks of innovation relationships: multiscopic views on Finland. Proceedings of XXIV ISPIM Conference, June 16-19, Helsinki, Finland.
  • Our approach: processes and toolchains (cf. NAV model) (1) Relational data (2) (3) SNA metrics Visualizations Degree Betweenness centrality … Eigenvector centrality Closeness centrality? Information centrality? (Hansen et al., 2009)
  • OTHER EXAMPLES OF SHOWING CONNECTIONS Connections of Twitter-followers Connections between innovation ecosystems Still, K., Huhtamäki, J., Russell, M. G. & Rubens, N. 2012. Transforming Innovation Ecosystems Through Network Orchestration: Case EIT ICT Labs. Proceedings of the XXIII ISPIM Conference – Action for Innovation: Innovating from Experience, June 17-20, 2012, Barcelona, Spain. Connections through projects Huhtamäki, J., Still, K., Isomursu, M., Russell, M. G. & Rubens, N. 2012. Networks of Growth: Case Young Innovative Companies in Finland. Proceedings of the 7th European Conference on Innovation and Entrepreneurship, September 20-21, 2012, Santarem, Portugal. Santerem, Portugal. Alumni connections Rubens, N., Russell, M.G., Perez, R., Huhtamäki, J., Still, K., Kaplan, D. & Okamoto, T. 2011.Alumni Network Analysis. In Global engineering education conference (educon), 2011, IEEE,Amman, Jordan, 2011, 606-611. Connections through citations in publications Still, K., Huhtamäki, J. & Martha Russell. 2013. Relational Capital and Social Capital: one or two Fields of Research? Proceedings of International Conference on Intellectual Capital and Knowledge
  • Experiment at Wallenberg Hall 14 seasoned decision makers as participants