Policy for pedestrians

775 views
674 views

Published on

A high level conference was organized by Institute of Development management where from our university Ar. Gaurav Agarwal attended and expressed views on RIGHT OF PEDESTRIANS, in the wake of recent death of a senior bureaucrat on road. It was attended by many dignitaries at Govt. & Private level.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
775
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
56
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Policy for pedestrians

  1. 1. Policy for Pedestrians
  2. 2. Structure Why Mobility  Urban  Regional Modes Why walk Problems Solutions Case studies
  3. 3. Why mobility Mobility + transport : socio-political issue in todays world. A prerequisite for economic success, social prosperity, and general satisfaction of all actors in society. Sustainable mobility is the need of hour The dynamic development of traffic - especially in regard to the growth of automobile traffic, the increasing tendency of travelling ever greater distances, and demographic change - poses an enormous scientific and technical challenge. Different related national research programmes for achieving the objective should be co-ordinated with one another. http://www.transport-research.info/web/programmes/programme_details.cfm?ID=3496
  4. 4. MODES COMMUTER RAIL METRO RAIL LIGHT RAILRegion Regiona Regional Regiona Regional Regionalal l Town l Town TownTown Town Town CBD CBD CBD Peri-urban Peri-urban Peri-urban Area Sub-urban Area Area Sub-urban Area Sub-urban Area Area Regional Regional Regional Regional Town Region Region Town Town Town a a Town Town TRAM BRTS MONO RAIL Region RegionalRegional Regiona Regional al TownTown l Town Town Town CBD CBD CBD Peri-urban Peri-urban Peri-urban Area Area Air Area Sub-urban Sub-urban Port Sub-urban Area Area Area Region Regional al Town Town
  5. 5. Walking is the most fundamental form of transportation Walkability takes into account the quality of pedestrian facilities,roadway conditions, land use patterns, community support, security and comfort for walking.• Land Use Setting • Street Design • Community • Sidewalks • Accessibility • Crosswalks • Location of Destinations • Roadway Conditions • Quality of Connections • Widths • Traffic Volumes • Traffic Speeds• Site Design • Accessible Pedestrian • Pathways Signals • Building Access ways • Related Facilities
  6. 6. Pedestrian Pedestrians can generally be defined as persons walking or jogging, persons using wheelchairs or mobility aids, people walking their dogs, people with children’s strollers, in-line skaters, and skateboarders.
  7. 7. Benefits of WalkingSocial Environmental Economic1. Improved health 1. Decreased 1. Lower health care2. Universal greenhouse gas costs mobility: walking emissions 2. Increased is available to all compared to employee people, driving productivity due to regardless of 2. Decreased physical activity income, mobility, energy and overall ability, age or consumption wellness gender compared to 3. Increased3. Energized driving attraction of new communities: 3. More efficient use residents, small walking supports of land businesses and and encourages tourism the growth of 4. Reduced personal services within transportation short distances, cost fosters interaction
  8. 8. Sustainable transport According to Daniel Bongardt, March 2011, a more sustainable transportation system is one that:  Social dimension: Allows the basic access and development needs of people to be met safely and promotes equity within and between successive generations.  Economic dimension: Is affordable within the limits imposed by internalization of external costs, operates fairly and efficiently, and fosters a balanced regional development.  Environmental dimension: Limits emissions of air pollution and GHGs as well as waste and minimizes the impact on the use of land and the generation of noise.  Degree of participation: Is designed in a participatory process, which
  9. 9. Pedestrians’ basic transportationneedsSpace to travel Design envelope Flow behavior Sidewalk zones Pedestrian facility width
  10. 10. Pedestrians’ basic transportationneedsConnectivity and convenience
  11. 11. Pedestrians’ basic transportationneedsRoutes free of obstructions
  12. 12. Pedestrians’ basic transportationneedsRoutes free of obstructions Comfort 1. Space for pedestrians must provide barrier-free comfort for travelling and waiting. 2. Comfort is affected by physical obstructions, 3. The pedestrian’s separation from traffic, shade (in summer), sunlight (in winter), route illumination, and informal “eyes on the street” provided by round-the- clock pedestrian activity and 4. Urban design that focuses on windows,
  13. 13. Pedestrians’ basic transportation needsCharacter and a feeling of security and safety• Safety should be inherent to the design of pedestrian facilities: for example, 1. by providing smooth surfaces; 2. pedestrian ramps; 3. clearly marked pedestrian crossings; 4. signal timing, devices and operation for the convenience of pedestrians; and 5. illumination onto pedestrian routes and crossings.• Security concerns for pedestrians include the risk of injury caused by another person. 1. To mitigate security concerns, the principles of Crime Prevention through Environmental Design
  14. 14. Policy interventions1. Pedestrian environment2. Missing links in new development3. Rehabilitation and repair - existing system4. Policy compliance/retrofit/upgrade5. Missing links and system completion6. Use paths (social trails)7. Sidewalk maintenance8. Pedestrian street crossings9. Education and Enforcement.
  15. 15. Pedestrian environment Encouraging walking; Using a landscaped area to provide a buffer zone Encouraging street vendors and sidewalk cafes; Using colored and textured material to indicate pedestrian facilities and crossings Integrating street art Providing adequate lighting; Providing public spaces Making other transportation-related
  16. 16. Side walk improvement The zone system divides the sidewalk corridor into four zones to ensure that pedestrians have a sufficient amount of clear space to travel. Zone Min. Width Curb 6 in. Planter/Furniture/Utility 24 in., 48 in. if planted Pedestrian Access Route 60 in. Frontage 30 in. Total Sidewalk Corridor 10 ft. – 12 ft.
  17. 17. Pedestrian crossing At wide intersections, pedestrian access can be enhanced through a variety of features.
  18. 18. Streets which could bepedestrian Commercial Play Institutional Heritage Old areas/ developments Uncontrolled high traffic volume / pollution levels
  19. 19. Commercial street should be: Area with concentration of unique and independently owned (or managed) retail outlets and restaurants Short, walkable distances between stores and restaurants High volume of pedestrian, transit, and cycling visitors Existing “destination” street, which draws visitors from around the city Easily accessible by transit Supportive and cohesive merchant community
  20. 20. Commercial street can be appreciated byfollowing activities: Encourage interaction between merchants and the street with sidewalk tables and displays Good marketing Get people into the street by planning for programming (tables/chairs, performers, etc.) Collaborate! Work together with local merchants to brainstorm ideas for the street and arrange programming Aim for good weather – people shop and stroll when weather is warm but not too warm; plan your events around months with favorable conditions.
  21. 21. “Walking trips in Metropolitan Cities” •Share of walk trips in bigger cities (More than 10 million population) is quite substantial. •Mumbai 52%, Ahmedabad cycling and Walking 54%, Chennai 27%. •In Delhi, capital of India, 40% roads do not have footpaths23 CENTRAL ROAD RESEARCH INSTITUTE
  22. 22. Profile of Walkers • Walking is the mode for the poor • Mode of disrepute • Pedestrians come from unauthorized colonies, slum clusters and low-income areas • They even cannot afford public transport fares • Mostly laborers, students, housewives etc.24 CENTRAL ROAD RESEARCH INSTITUTE
  23. 23. 25
  24. 24. Crossing FacilitiesApril, 2008 Study on “Pedestrian Safety at Urban Intersections in Delhi revealed• No pedestrian signal• Very few pedestrian refuge islands• Zebra crossings missing• Lack of subways or poor design• Inadequate crossing time CENTRAL ROAD RESEARCH INSTITUTE
  25. 25. Available Pedestrian Facilities At 30% surveyed four arm intersections and 40% T- intersections, encroachment was there Only at 10% four arm intersections and 21% T- intersections, pedestrian Refuge Islands were available. So very few pedestrian crossing facilities are available.
  26. 26. Availability and Width of side walks Intersection Side Walk Side Walk width Type Availability (%age) (%age) < 0.9m 0.9 to 1.8 to > 1.8m 2.7m 2.7m Four-Arms 86 11 22 39 28 T- 67 8 33 42 17 Intersections
  27. 27. Opinion of Pedestrians SAFE SOMEWHAT SAFE ROAD TOO WIDE TO CROSS TRAFFIC SIGNAL TIME INADEQUATE UNSAFE VERY UNSAFE PARKED VEHICLES CYCLISTS DO NOT STOP AT RED SIGNAL, WASTING TIME TO CROSS 17%41% 27% 16% 32% 26% 6% 35% FIG. 8.5.1 REASONS FOR INADEQUACY OF FIG.8.1.1 HOW SAFE TO CROSS TIME TO CROSS THE INTERSECTION
  28. 28. Thank you !

×