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Civic Innovation Summer
@ejacqui
@danxoneil
Field trip to 1871
Everybody loves field trips.
Tour of 1871
• 1871 is a digital startup center of Chicago
Tour of 1871
• What service does 1871 serve to the
community?
• It gives tiny companies and startups a place to
meet and w...
• Allows community members to share ideas
and work together on tech projects
• This photo is from Chicago’s OpenGov Hack
N...
Tour of 1871
• What kind of companies come to 1871?
Tour of 1871
• Sometimes an entire startup will base
themselves out of 1871, like A Better Chicago,
iHeartArt, Weave the P...
1871’s Starter League
• What is Starter League?
1871’s Starter League
• Starter League used to be Code Academy, a
coding resource that helps you learn new
programming lan...
1871’s Starter League
• Starter League teaches classes on
HTML, CSS, all they way up to Ruby classes
• Not just programmin...
Jobs at startups
• It’s not just about programmers!
Jobs at startups
• Project managers
• Product leaders
• Sales people
• Social media experts
• Office managers
• Public/pre...
Speakers
• Mari Huertas: project manager
• Jason Kunesh: user experience designer
• Rayid Ghani: data analytics
• Gene Ley...
1871 companies
• What were their paths to creating companies?
• Where did they work before? What interests
did they have?
...
More 1871 speakers!
• Jimmy Odom from WeDeliver
• Dirk McCoy from Spendbot
• Rod Rakic from OpenAirplane
#CivicSummer at 1871
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#CivicSummer at 1871

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This is the presentation we used to help guide our Friday session at #CivicSummer at 1871

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  • This week is structured with: about 30 minutes to walk around 1871, 30 minutes to show this presentation leading up to guest speakers, 1 hour of startup founders, 45 minutes-1hour for lunch, and 1 hour for non-programmer tech workers.
  • This week’s class is being held at 1871 in Chicago, a large digital startup center/coworking space that enables people involved in small companies to work together and share ideas in a shared spaceThe main purpose of this week is to give the students direct exposure to the kind of environment where startups work, and where people work with dataThere will mostly be guest speakers filling this week’s class timeWe’ll open up with a discussion about the purpose 1871 serves to both the city and the tech community
  • This week’s class is being held at 1871 in Chicago, a large digital startup center/coworking space that enables people involved in small companies to work together and share ideas in a shared spaceThe main purpose of this week is to give the students direct exposure to the kind of environment where startups work, and where people work with dataThere will mostly be guest speakers filling this week’s class timeWe’ll open up with a discussion about the purpose 1871 serves to both the city and the tech community
  • This week’s class is being held at 1871 in Chicago, a large digital startup center/coworking space that enables people involved in small companies to work together and share ideas in a shared spaceThe main purpose of this week is to give the students direct exposure to the kind of environment where startups work, and where people work with dataThere will mostly be guest speakers filling this week’s class timeWe’ll open up with a discussion about the purpose 1871 serves to both the city and the tech community
  • Now we’ll discuss what kind of companies come to 1871Whole organizations or companies might rent out space at 1871 because they don’t want to (or can’t) afford overhead costs of their own officeMany startups are running on shoestring budgets, so the ability to rent some space in a shared office is very beneficialDiscuss the purpose of “co-working” spaces, which offer a place for free-floating workers like coders, writers, project managers who work on the Internet, or their office is in another cityIndividuals like those can sometimes work out of 1871 too, but the main purpose is for companies to collaborate and share ideashttp://www.1871.com/community/members/
  • Now we’ll discuss what kind of companies come to 1871Whole organizations or companies might rent out space at 1871 because they don’t want to (or can’t) afford overhead costs of their own officeMany startups are running on shoestring budgets, so the ability to rent some space in a shared office is very beneficialDiscuss the purpose of “co-working” spaces, which offer a place for free-floating workers like coders, writers, project managers who work on the Internet, or their office is in another cityIndividuals like those can sometimes work out of 1871 too, but the main purpose is for companies to collaborate and share ideas
  • We’ll spend another 30 minutes or so talking about Starter LeagueDiscuss Starter League’s origins as Code Academy, which was a way to teach people who are new to programming about the basics of HTML, CSS, Ruby, and designStarter League partnered with a local company, 37signals, to use subject-matter-experts to teach studentsStarter League is based out of 1871 and teaches classes there, from web design and development all the way to legit coding in Ruby and beyond
  • We’ll spend another 30 minutes or so talking about Starter LeagueDiscuss Starter League’s origins as Code Academy, which was a way to teach people who are new to programming about the basics of HTML, CSS, Ruby, and designStarter League partnered with a local company, 37signals, to use subject-matter-experts to teach studentsStarter League is based out of 1871 and teaches classes there, from web design and development all the way to legit coding in Ruby and beyond
  • Go into detail on the kinds of classes offered by Starter League, look at their website with the studentsDiscuss why Starter League exists: it’s meant for people who are new to programming and tech, and doesn’t require any kind of background to get startedBe realistic about what can be expected from Starter LeagueIt won’t get you a job as a CEO or a CTO of a startup that’s going to make a billion dollars right awayIt will give you the skills needed to get started in this quickly growing tech worldThere’s demand for programmers and tech people at all levels of experience, and Starter League enables that
  • It’s important to highlight that Starter League costs money, so it’s an investment in yourselfIt’s $8,000 for a full web development course, or $2,000 for HTML and CSSThis is a lot of money, but it could be worth it if you’re serious about learning to program without going to college for computer science(College costs a lot more!)Current students can work with Starter League to figure out a schedule that works around their classes
  • Again, we’ll re-iterate the talk from week 2 about how there are other jobs at startups besides programmersDiscuss the roles of some of these people at a startupHighlight that even if you don’t want to become a coder, you can still be involved in tech and open dataBring in speakers who do some of these other jobs, maybe 5-10 minutes apiece for a total of 45 minutesIdea is to highlight the many jobs available at a tech companyInclude a Q&A session at the end of this session so students can find out more from the speakers
  • Before this, 45 minute break for lunch/chattingAgain, we’ll re-iterate the talk from week 2 about how there are other jobs at startups besides programmersDiscuss the roles of some of these people at a startupHighlight that even if you don’t want to become a coder, you can still be involved in tech and open dataBring in speakers who do some of these other jobs, 15 minutes apiece for a total of 1 hourIdea is to highlight the many jobs available at a tech companyInclude a Q&A session at the end of this session so students can find out more from the speakers
  • Here’s where the guest speakers for this week come in!Bring in startup founders to talk for about ~1 hours (with break in between) about their experiences getting into technology and joining a startupCould range from 4 startup founders to 6 or even 8, depending on how long you want each of them to talkFollow each speaker with ~10 minutes of questions from students
  • Transcript of "#CivicSummer at 1871"

    1. 1. Civic Innovation Summer @ejacqui @danxoneil
    2. 2. Field trip to 1871 Everybody loves field trips.
    3. 3. Tour of 1871 • 1871 is a digital startup center of Chicago
    4. 4. Tour of 1871 • What service does 1871 serve to the community? • It gives tiny companies and startups a place to meet and work together without having to spend huge overhead ($$$) on an office
    5. 5. • Allows community members to share ideas and work together on tech projects • This photo is from Chicago’s OpenGov Hack Night at 1871
    6. 6. Tour of 1871 • What kind of companies come to 1871?
    7. 7. Tour of 1871 • Sometimes an entire startup will base themselves out of 1871, like A Better Chicago, iHeartArt, Weave the People • Others will work out of 1871 occasionally: Knight Lab, members of the Obama campaign
    8. 8. 1871’s Starter League • What is Starter League?
    9. 9. 1871’s Starter League • Starter League used to be Code Academy, a coding resource that helps you learn new programming languages • Starter League partnered with a local company, 37signals, to teach programming at 1871
    10. 10. 1871’s Starter League • Starter League teaches classes on HTML, CSS, all they way up to Ruby classes • Not just programming classes: UI/UX design classes too • Starter League shows you don’t have to get a university degree to start getting into tech
    11. 11. Jobs at startups • It’s not just about programmers!
    12. 12. Jobs at startups • Project managers • Product leaders • Sales people • Social media experts • Office managers • Public/press relations • What else?
    13. 13. Speakers • Mari Huertas: project manager • Jason Kunesh: user experience designer • Rayid Ghani: data analytics • Gene Leynes from Yolobe
    14. 14. 1871 companies • What were their paths to creating companies? • Where did they work before? What interests did they have? • What was the catalyst to drive them to start a new company?
    15. 15. More 1871 speakers! • Jimmy Odom from WeDeliver • Dirk McCoy from Spendbot • Rod Rakic from OpenAirplane
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