Nature of a Lie

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Nature of a Lie

  1. 1. In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements of the Course Philosophy II: Ethics Submitted by: KEIZEN DANICA S. ARNADO JUFFER DENN C. BORNALES JENNIFER T. CAÑETE LIEZEL CONAHAP COLEEN MONIQUE GALON SUNSHINE JADE A. LUNA RUBY ORTEGA LARRY PASTOR RACHEL MAE RECIO LOVELY TUANZON Submitted to: MR. JIOLITO BENITEZ Professor March 19, 2013
  2. 2. I. Essay Lie. A three letter word that can make or break a life. Although doomed, lying is an act that has become a common behavior. Through ages lying had grown so natural to people — an avoidable part of human nature. The Oxford dictionary defines a lie as "an intentionally false statement used in order to deceive". I should say, this definition is inaccurate. A lie communicates information, believing it to be untrue, which is intended to deceive or mislead. What makes a lie a lie is that the liar intends to decieve the person they are lying to by providing them an information, but I believe that the information use to mislead need not be false with bad intentions. People lie for a reason. And there are many reasons why people lie. A lie comes in many forms and variations depending on the situation it is to be used in. A lie may be intended to accomplish something; it may be geared towards sparing other people’s feelings; it may be to disguise the oft-humiliating fact that we do not know the truth or can’t remember it; it may be fallacious conclusions or extrapolations based on true assumptions or statements; or, it may conceal or remove true information and thus mislead others. Whatever these are, one thing is certain, we lie to cover up the truth because we are afraid that it might produce hazard. Whether traversing an action to get away from castigation or insinuate an erroneous statement to induce or beguile, lying is still an art, in which if mastered, can be a very useful tool in life. It is functional because lies are used for many different purposes. But regardless of the situation, yes, lying can be an effective escape but the consequences of getting caught may sometimes be more detrimental than its worth. The aftermath of a lie brings about malevolence in the lives of both the person who lied and he who is lied to. No matter what nature lie has a lie will remain to be a basic moral wrong. It diminishes trust between people and breed chained problems. Once caught, people will never trust you. If they do, you will still be remembered the liar that you are for you had created your image in the minds of people the kind of person you are. To make matters worse is that people might also loose their respect for you. And that is why we should always weigh things first before performing an action.
  3. 3. II. Perspectives Christian Ethics God's will alone decides what is right and wrong and human reason has no authority. God has absolute authority. All humans could do is to accept and respond to God's revelation of what is right and wrong. So, there are ten commandments of God, one of those commandments states that "Thou shall not bear false witness against thy neighbor. If we are going to focus on the ten commandments of God, telling lies is not good in the eyes of God. Utilitarianism Consequentialists assess the rightness or wrongness of doing something by looking at the consequences caused by that act. So if telling a particular lie produces a better result than not telling it, then telling it would be a good thing to do. And if telling a particular lie produces a worse result than not telling it, telling it would be a bad thing to do. These two forms of Utilitarianism could lead to different results: An act-Utilitarian might say that telling a lie in a particular case did lead to the best results for everyone involved and for society as a whole, while a rule-Utilitarian might argue that since lying made society a less happy place, it was wrong to tell lies, even in this particular case. Situation Ethics In the viewpoint of situation ethics, lie is a moral act if the reason why you are lying is love. It means that when are lying because of love, then a lie would be morally right. Fletcher says that we are under obligation to tell the truth only if the situation demands it, but we are to love in all situations. For Fletcher, whatever is the loving thing to do is the right thing to do. In situation ethics, even if you are doing things unlovingly, then it is wrong, but if you do things, even if wrong such as lying, lovingly then it is right. Deontologists Deontologists don't always agree on how we arrive at 'moral laws', or on what such laws are, but one generally accepted moral law is 'do not tell lies'.
  4. 4. And if that is the law then lying is always wrong - even if telling the truth would produce far better consequences: so if I lie to a Nazi who knocks on my door and asks me if there's any Jews in my house when you have 20 of them in your attic, and so to save their lives, I have in fact done wrong, because I broke the rule that says lying is wrong. Most of us would accept that an unbreakable rule against lying would be unworkable, but a more sophisticated rule (perhaps one with a list of exceptions) might be something we could live with. Prima Facie Duties In the perspective of Prima Facie Duties, lie is always wrong especially when it causes harm to others. Although Ross believes that in all situations you have the first duty which is not to lie, but if this(situation) action can prevent harm and promote welfare of the others, then lie is not wrong because the Prima Facie Duties are only obligatory except when overridden by other duties.

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