Latin America Online 2006
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    Latin America Online 2006 Latin America Online 2006 Document Transcript

    • August 2006 Latin America Online James Belcher, Senior Analyst jbelcher@emarketer.com Executive Summary: After years of low overall Internet penetration and slow broadband growth, Latin America is showing some zip. The region has had economic growth for two years in a row, driven by the major population centers in Brazil and Mexico. These countries, along with Argentina and Chile, have the most Internet users in the region. 074868 The number of broadband subscribers in the region grew Latin America: Key Indicators, 2005 over 70% last year. Latin Americans are also engaging in The Economy (1) Population (millions) 528 e-commerce, and 30% of Internet users have bought books GDP (at market exchange rates) (billions) $2,424 online—a proven category in online shopping. Convincing Real GDP growth 4.3% shoppers to go online for bigger ticket items will be tough, The Internet (2) since Latin Americans are suspicious of the reliability of Internet users (millions) 60.5 online payment methods and delivery. Broadband households (millions) 7.3 There is a lot to like about Latin America for online Advertising (3) marketers. For one, online ad spending in the region is set Online advertising and Internet access spending (millions) $4,341 to grow far more rapidly than traditional advertising. Another Source: (1) Economist Intelligence Unit, June 2006; (2) eMarketer, May attractive aspect of the market is its demographics: Internet 2006; (3) PricewaterhouseCoopers and Wilkofsky Gruen, June 2006 074868 www.eMarketer.com users in Latin America tend to be younger than the population as a whole, and are also more likely from middle or upper socioeconomic groups, a desirable demographic target online. As in other regions, Latin Americans use the Internet for e-mail and communication—especially instant messaging. This makes word of mouth and viral marketing important aspects of reaching online audiences here, be it in Spanish or Portuguese. The First Place to Look Copyright ©2006 eMarketer, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • Doing Business In Latin America The Economy For Large Enterprises Background: Military rule and populist economic policies Moving e-commerce beyond Amazon staples like books, DVDs, created instability in Latin America for much of the second half of and music CDs will require increased consumer trust of online the twentieth century. A debt crisis that started in 1982 threw the payment methods and delivery systems. Offering pickup and region into recession and triggered political changes as military return services for goods through retail outlets can help overcome governments fell and economic policies became less nationalist delivery worries, while payment services providers may consider and more market-oriented. A re-emergence of populist and affiliating with specific sites. Since bank-issued credit cards are a nationalist sentiment, fuelled by sluggish growth and increasing popular online payment method, statement inserts or online political alienation, has become a source of concern. banking notices can help remind users of fraud liability limits and Political structure: With the exception of Cuba, all countries have other card protections. democratically-elected governments, most with strong presidencies. Although there is little risk of a return to military rule, confidence in For SMEs institutions and the political class has fallen in the past decade As many as a third of Latin American Internet users go online at reflecting economic underperformance and falling standards of Internet cafes. Nearby small businesses may consider advertising living.The loss of support for mainstream parties is leading to more there, especially if they sell goods that are researched online but difficult legislative environments and has fuelled instability in several not often purchased online, like food and clothing. countries, most recently Bolivia, Ecuador and Venezuela. Colombia remains in the grip of a decades-long guerrilla conflict. For Online Marketers and Ad Agencies With online advertising spending growth in Latin America Policy issues: Import-substituting industrialization policies were outpacing that for traditional ads, now is a good time to be in the abandoned in the 1980s and 1990s, when trade and investment interactive space. Online purchases follow online research, so regimes were liberalized across the region. Most countries now information-rich campaigns may still be effective even without a have floating exchange rate regimes, usually supported by an inflation-targeting framework. Government finances remain weak in heavy push to complete the transaction online. Beware flashy or many countries despite reforms. Although Latin America has made potentially annoying ads, which may distract online browsers, as a large adjustment in its external accounts in recent years, its high these are reviled even more than spam in Latin America. Of level of loans from other countries and a rising stock of foreign course, since broadband users are still in the minority, rich media direct investment, which sends profits abroad, mean that its ads are not the best mass market approach anyway. external financing requirement remains high, leaving it exposed to the international liquidity cycle. The region also remains heavily dependent on primary commodities exports, leaving it vulnerable to trade fluctuations. The long-term policy environment for foreign investment will remain insecure in many countries until widespread unemployment and inequality—the root causes of instability—are overcome. Low skill levels remain a major weakness. Many countries in the region have become heavily dependent on family remittances from emigrant workers, mostly in the US and Europe. Taxation: Most regional tax systems rely heavily on indirect taxes and royalties from minerals extraction. Efforts to raise generally low levels of tax collection are often thwarted by a culture of tax evasion and weak institutional capacity. Foreign trade: The region has become more open, with exports rising from 15% of GDP in the first half of the 1990s to over 20% since 2000. The US remains the main export market for most countries, although trade diversification has increased. China is a growing market for the region’s raw materials’ producers. Mexico accounts for around 50% of regional trade. Note: Portions of this section were drawn from data and analysis in the EIU’s ViewsWire service http://www.viewswire.com Latin America Online 2
    • Internet Access After years of economic instability, two years of Even a cursory glance at the major countries within Latin America reveals their dominant position in the region’s online environment. growth in the region have contributed to Specifically, Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico accounted for 79% broadband growth in the key markets of Latin of all Latin America’s Internet users as of 2005. America. Mexico and Brazil serve as drivers for the Internet Users in Select Countries and Regions entire region. Telmex in Mexico and Brasil Telecom Worldwide, 2005 (millions) Number of people with Internet both experienced broadband subscriber growth of Internet access* users** US 205.8 175.4 over 80% in 2005. If relative regional stability Canada 22.0 18.5 continues, Latin America is likely to become an North America 227.8 193.9 important player in the global digital landscape. France 26.4 20.9 Germany 48.6 36.6 Leading Broadband Access Providers in Latin Italy 28.5 22.2 America, 2004 & 2005 (thousands of subscribers and Spain 17.4 11.9 % increase/decrease vs. prior year) UK 37.9 28.4 Country Tech- 2004 2005 % European Union 232.9 188.1 nology change Total Europe 292.1 233.3 Telemex Mexico ADSL 560 1,033 84.4% EMEA 334.0 275.6 Telesp Brazil ADSL 826 1,207 46.0% Argentina 10.0 5.8 Brasil Telecom Brazil ADSL 536 1,014 89.2% Brazil 25.8 21.8 Telemar Brazil ADSL 496 805 62.3% Chile 5.6 4.7 Telefonica del Peru Peru ADSL 200 340 69.8% Mexico 17.1 15.6 Telefonica CTC Chile Chile ADSL 201 314 56.5% Total Latin America 74.9 60.5 Telefonica de Argentina Argentina ADSL 190 304 59.6% Australia 14.1 12.1 VTR* Chile Cable 215 240 11.6% Internet China 132.8 111.0 Cablevision Argentina Argentina Cable - 213 - India 50.6 27.7 Internet Japan 86.3 75.7 Telecom Argentina Argentina ADSL 81 162 100.0% South Korea 33.9 33.1 Entel Chile ADSL & WLL 59 55 -5.8% Total Asia-Pacific 384.2 315.4 Multicanal Argentina Cable - 55 - Worldwide 1,020.90 845.4 Internet Note: *eMarketer estimates based on Nielsen//NetRatings and ITU Total - - 3,365 5,743 70.7% estimates; **eMarketer defines an Internet user as someone aged 3+ Note: *eMarketer estimate accessing the Internet at least once per month Source: company reports, 2005 & 2006 Source: eMarketer, May 2006 072641 www.eMarketer.com 072587 www.eMarketer.com 072641 072587 Latin America Online 3
    • Internet Access Broadband Broadband Subscribers and Broadband Households in Latin America’s share of the world’s broadband user base is tiny, Select Countries and Regions Worldwide, 2005 according to a March 2006 by Point Topic, which found that Latin (millions) Broadband Broadband America’s broadband subscribers accounted for only 3% of the subscribers households global total. (all lines) (2) (1) Breakdown of Broadband Subscribers Worldwide, by US 49.4 (3) 43.7 Region, Q4 2005 (% of total) Canada 6.7 (3) 6.5 North America 56.1 (3) 50.2 Western Europe 26% France 10.0 8.9 North America 26% Germany 10.7 9.1 Asia-Pacific 24% Italy 6.7 5.8 Spain 4.8 4.2 South and East Asia 18% UK 9.8 9.0 Latin America 3% Total Western Europe 57.5 50.7 Eastern Europe 2% Total EMEA 67.5 59.5 Middle East and Africa 1% Argentina 0.8 0.7 Brazil 3.3 3.1 Source: Point Topic, March 2006 073233 Mexico 2.3 1.9 www.eMarketer.com 073233 Total Latin America 8.2 7.3 The same study also featured numerical counts of broadband Australia 2.7 2.4 subscribership in Latin America, along with the major individual China 37.5 34.1 countries in the region. eMarketer found that Latin American India 0.8 0.8 Japan 22.1 20.8 broadband households make up a similarly small percentage of South Korea 12.2 11.7 the worldwide total, with 3.8%. Total Asia-Pacific 83.4 77.6 Worldwide 215.4 (4) 194.6 Note: A broadband subscriber is any business, household, organization or individual that has paid for a broadband Internet connection; a broadband household is a measure of only residential households with a broadband connection Source: (1) Point Topic, March 2006 unless otherwise stated; (2) eMarketer, May 2006; (3) OECD, March 2006; (4) eMarketer, May2006 072607 www.eMarketer.com 072607 According to a June 2006 study by PriceWaterhouseCoopers and Wilkofsky Gruen Associates, Brazilians spend the most money in total on broadband access in Latin America, and will continue to do so through 2010. Broadband Access Spending in Select Countries in Latin America, 2004-2010 (millions) 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Argentina $184 $348 $515 $662 $777 $891 $1,002 Brazil $254 $414 $626 $887 $1,153 $1,405 $1,641 Chile $74 $129 $149 $168 $186 $203 $219 Colombia - - - $12 $23 $40 $51 Mexico $184 $297 $399 $478 $535 $572 $605 Venezuela - - $16 $32 $48 $69 $92 Total for 6 $696 $1,188 $1,705 $2,239 $2,722 $3,180 $3,610 countries Source: PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), Wilkofsky Gruen Associates, June 2006 074062 www.eMarketer.com 074062 Latin America Online 4
    • Internet Access Although Latin America has fewer broadband subscribers than any other region in the world, subscribership is growing at a “Several countries in Latin America are healthy rate, according to Morgan Stanley and company reports leapfrogging dial-up altogether, so the released in March 2006. region’s growth curve in broadband adoption may be far steeper than in the US Broadband Subscribers* Worldwide, by Region, and other regions.” 1999-2006 (thousands and % increase vs. prior year) —Ben Macklin, eMarketer Senior Analyst 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 072671 North America Subscribers 7,525 14,550 20,484 28,880 38,740 49,848 59,610 Internet Users and Broadband Households in Select % increase 203% 93% 41% 41% 34% 29% 20% Countries and Regions Worldwide, 2005 (millions) Europe Asia-Pacific Subscribers 983 2,872 9,966 24,693 42,225 60,301 - 315.4 % increase - 192% 247% 148% 71% 43% - 77.6 Japan Europe Subscribers 625 2,836 7,806 13,641 18,295 22,346 - 233.3 % increase - 354% 175% 75% 34% 22% - 55.2 Asia-Pacific US Subscribers 4,351 10,707 16,991 28,836 44,115 69,896 - 175.4 % increase - 146% 59% 58% 64% 58% - 43.7 Latin America China Subscribers 41 324 1,304 2,259 4,324 6,588 - 111.0 % increase - 689% 303% 73% 91% 52% - 34.1 Note: *primarily residential Latin America Source: Morgan Stanley, company reports, March 2006 074069 60.5 www.eMarketer.com 7.3 074069 eMarketer’s calculation of broadband subscriber growth, based Canada specifically on Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Mexico, was an even 18.5 6.5 higher 70.7% Worldwide Broadband Subscriber Growth* in Select Countries 845.4 and Regions Worldwide, 2005 vs. 2004 194.6 Latin America 70.7% Internet users Broadband households Western Europe 42.2% Note: eMarketer defines an Internet user as an individual aged 3+ who accesses the Internet at least once per month; a broadband household is a Asia-Pacific 37.7% measure of only residential households with a broadband connection Source: eMarketer, May 2006 US 27.7% 072671 www.eMarketer.com Canada 18.3% Latin America’s steep broadband growth bodes well for paid Note: *growth represents broadband subscriber additions during 2005 content as well. An April 2006 Frost & Sullivan study estimated that among the leading broadband access providers in those particular countries or regions revenue from such content would reach $234.5 million in 2011, up Source: eMarketer, May 2006 from $87.1 million in 2005. 072670 www.eMarketer.com 072670 Paid Broadband Content Revenues in Latin America, As a point of comparison, the US has nearly three times the 2005 & 2011 (millions) number of Internet users as all of Latin America, and nearly six 2005 $87.1 times the number of broadband users. 2011 $234.5 Source: Frost & Sullivan, April 2006 071755 www.eMarketer.com 071755 Latin America Online 5
    • 072600 Internet Access Internet connectivity among businesses in Latin America trails the Broadband Household Penetration in Select Countries US not only in sheer numbers, but in connection speeds as well. in Latin America, 2005 & 2010 (% of total households) While over 90% of large US businesses are connected to the Chile Internet, no more than two-thirds of Latin American businesses of 13.9% any size were connected to the Internet as of July 2005 according 29.6% to Momentum Research Group. Internet-connected businesses in Mexico Latin America typically connect at low-speed DSL rates of 7.7% 128kbps-768kbps. 28.5% Argentina Connected Organizations* in Latin America, by Size 7.2% and Internet Access Technology, 2005 (% of total in 18.8% each group) 25-99 100-499 500+ Total Brazil Dial-up service (<64 kbps) 21% 15% 9% 15% 6.8% 19.8% Broadband, such as ISDN, DSL or frame relay 56% 65% 60% 62% (128 -768 kbps) 2005 2010 Broadband, such as E1, E3 or Ethernet 12% 14% 22% 15% (1.544+ mbps) Note: includes ADSL, cable, satellite, fixed wireless, fiber, powerline, WiMAX and emerging broadband technologies accessed at home Don't know/refused 12% 6% 8% 8% Source: eMarketer, May 2006 Note: n=1,212 (total); numbers do not add up to 100% due to rounding; 072648 www.eMarketer.com *defined as having a network with enterprise software Source: Momentum Research Group, July 2005 Broadband Households in Select Countries in Latin 071337 www.eMarketer.com America, by Access Technology, 2005 (thousands) 071337 ADSL Cable Other* Total The following charts represent eMarketer’s Internet user and Argentina 420 315 6 741 broadband household projections for Argentina, Brazil, Chile Brazil 2,685 400 24 3,109 and Mexico. Chile 310 245 15 570 Mexico 1,210 625 15 1,850 Internet Users in Select Countries in Latin America, Total for 4 countries 4,625 1,585 60 6,270 2004-2010 (millions and penetration) Note: *includes fixed wireless, fiber, powerline, WiMAX and emerging 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 broadband technologies accessed at home Argentina 4.9 5.8 6.7 7.6 8.4 9.3 10.3 Source: eMarketer, May 2006 072649 www.eMarketer.com % of population 12.5% 14.7% 16.8% 18.9% 20.6% 22.7% 24.9% 072645 072648 072649 Brazil 19.3 21.8 24.4 26.5 28.3 30.1 32.0 % of population 10.5% 11.7% 13.0% 13.9% 14.7% 15.5% 16.4% eMarketer expects alternative broadband Internet access in the Chile 4.3 4.7 5.0 5.4 5.7 5.9 6.2 region to increase significantly through 2010. In Brazil, nearly half a % of population 27.2% 29.4% 31.1% 33.1% 34.8% 35.5% 37.1% million subscribers will access the Internet via broadband by some Mexico 14.0 15.6 17.3 19.2 20.9 22.5 25.0 other means besides DSL and cable. % of population 13.3% 14.7% 16.1% 17.7% 19.0% 20.2% 22.2% Broadband Households in Select Countries in Latin Note: eMarketer defines an Internet user as a person aged 3+ who accesses the Internet at least once per month America, by Access Technology, 2010 (thousands) Source: eMarketer, May 2006 ADSL Cable Other* Total 072600 www.eMarketer.com Argentina 1,394 607 33 2,034 Broadband Households in Select Countries in Latin Brazil 7,995 909 489 9,393 America, 2004-2010 (thousands) Chile 800 409 80 1,289 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Mexico 5,613 1,589 129 7,331 Argentina 423 741 923 1,199 1,518 1,800 2,034 Total for 4 countries 15,802 3,514 731 20,047 Brazil 2,002 3,109 4,227 5,603 6,981 8,183 9,393 Note: *includes fixed wireless, fiber, powerline, WiMAX and emerging broadband technologies accessed at home Chile 450 570 702 835 992 1,129 1,289 Source: eMarketer, May 2006 Mexico 815 1,850 2,736 3,789 5,000 6,080 7,331 072651 www.eMarketer.com Total for 4 3,690 6,270 8,588 11,426 14,491 17,192 20,047 072651 countries Note: includes ADSL, cable, satellite, fixed wireless, fiber, powerline, WiMAX and emerging broadband technologies accessed at home Source: eMarketer, May 2006 072645 www.eMarketer.com Latin America Online 6
    • Internet Access Market research firm Pyramid Research estimated that Wi-Fi users Cybercafes in Mexico account for more Internet users (30%) than in Latin America would grow by 54% through 2009, up to 8.3 the workplace (20%). million users from the 2006 level of 4.5 million. Internet Users in Mexico, by Access Location, 2005 (% Worldwide Wi-Fi Users, by Region, 2004-2006 & 2009 of total) (thousands) 2004 2005 2006 2009 School Asia-Pacific 32,937 55,341 81,048 168,193 10% Western Europe 16,681 24,877 33,546 63,746 Work Central and Eastern Europe 2,109 3,172 4,383 9,875 20% Home 40% Latin America 2,386 3,401 4,528 8,331 Africa/Middle East 287 664 1,096 2,747 Cybercafe North America 20,570 30,235 40,454 74,174 30% Total 74,969 117,690 165,056 327,066 Source: Pyramid Research, September 2005; BusinessWeek, October 2005 Source: AMIPCI, October 2005 071781 www.eMarketer.com 072557 www.eMarketer.com 071781 072557 As is the case globally, getting people to pay for Wi-Fi in Latin The installed base of PCs in Mexico is less than a fourth of that of America is a tough sell. Pyramid Research found that only 11% mobile phones. This relatively low PC penetration presents a of the predicted 8.3 million Wi-Fi users in 2009 would pay for barrier to Internet access in the home; the cybercafé is often the their access. only means of access. Worldwide Wi-Fi Paid Subscribers, by Region, 2004-2006 & 2009 (thousands) Installed Base of Select Internet Access Devices in Mexico, 2005 (millions) 2004 2005 2006 2009 Asia-Pacific 765 1,950 3,540 9,585 Personal computers 10.8 Western Europe 333 921 1,747 5,118 Mobile phones 46.1 Central and Eastern Europe 14 45 102 461 PDAs 1.7 Latin America 46 135 262 769 Africa/Middle East 0 12 32 136 Source: AMIPCI, October 2005 North America 700 1,480 2,844 7,219 072549 www.eMarketer.com 072549 Total 1,858 4,542 8,528 23,286 Internet penetration is low in other Latin American countries, but Source: Pyramid Research, September 2005; BusinessWeek, October 2005 071782 www.eMarketer.com is expected to grow quickly thanks to infrastructure investment. A 071782 May 2006 study by Peruvian statistical agency INEI predicted Internet penetration growth greater than 100% for 2005-2006. Internet Access Locations Beyond home, work and school, many Latin Americans access the Internet Penetration in Peru, 2005 & 2006 Internet via “Internet places,” which are cybercafés and businesses where telecom companies provide Internet access. In 2005 1.73% Argentina, 59% of respondents to a July 2005 study by D’Alessio 2006 3.93% and Clarin.com named Internet places as the location they most Note: January-March of each year often accessed the Internet. Source: Instituto Nacional de Estadistica e Informatica (INEI) - Peru, May 2006 074314 www.eMarketer.com Most Frequently Used Internet Access Locations in 074314 Argentina, 2005 (% of respondents) Internet place* 59% Home 41% Work 14% University 3% Note: *includes cybercafes and businesses where telecom companies provide Internet access Source: D'Alessio and Clarin.com, July 2005 074221 www.eMarketer.com 074221 Latin America Online 7
    • Internet Access Usage Venezuela’s low aggregate Internet user numbers belie quick When asked what they like about the Internet by growth. Market research firm Tendencias Digitales estimated Venezuela’s Internet users in 2005 at 3.1 million, up nearly 50% Tendencias Digitales in March 2006, most Latin over 2.2 million in 2004. Americans said they like the amount and variety of information available. Internet Users and Penetration in Venezuela, 1998-2005 Internet users % of population Most Popular Features of the Internet according to Internet Users in Latin America, November 1998 207,000 0.85% 2005-January 2006 (% of respondents) 1999 526,000 2.18% Argentina Chile Colombia Peru Venezuela 2000 852,000 3.46% Amount and variety of 28.5% 21.8% 30.9% 35.9% 28.1% 2001 1,200,000 4.78% information 2002 1,585,000 6.31% Ability to obtain information 17.9% 22.1% 17.0% 19.3% 21.1% quickly 2003 1,365,000 5.43% Ability to communicate 14.4% 12.6% 12.0% 11.7% 17.3% 2004 2,200,000 7.07% Easy access to information 4.9% 7.7% 14.8% 9.6% 9.7% 2005 3,100,000 11.66% Global scope of information 8.7% 2.1% 6.4% 4.4% 5.4% Source: Tendencias Digitales, February 2006 073978 www.eMarketer.com The present time of 4.9% 3.2% 4.4% 6.1% 6.5% information Internet Access Locations Used in Venezuela, Note: n=368 (Argentina), n=285 (Chile), n=1,045 (Colombia), n=429 (Peru), 2000-2005 (% of respondents) n=445 (Venezuela) Source: Tendencias Digitales, March 2006 Cybercafe* Home Work Training Information 073510 www.eMarketer.com center center June 2000 10.0% 35.0% 27.0% 21.0% 0.0% Least Popular Aspects of the Internet according to November 2001 23.0% 38.0% 15.0% 14.0% 3.0% Internet Users in Latin America, November June 2002 35.0% 31.0% 18.0% 12.0% 6.0% 2005-January 2006 (% of respondents) July 2003 49.0% 24.0% 17.0% 11.0% 12.0% Argentina Chile Colombia Peru Venezuela December 2003 57.0% 19.0% 16.0% 9.0% 10.0% Spam 25.0% 18.9% 17.4% 21.9% 20.9% October 2004 66.0% 20.0% 11.0% 10.0% 3.0% Viruses 16.8% 9.8% 18.7% 18.6% 14.2% December 2004 66.0% 14.0% 12.0% 8.0% 5.0% Excessive publicity 10.6% 12.3% 13.5% 14.0% 16.9% December 2005 65.0% 13.0% 18.0% 7.0% 4.0% Pornography 10.1% 9.8% 8.3% 10.5% 9.2% Note: *Cybercafes include the Centers of Telecommunications of the Slow navigation 2.4% 6.7% 6.5% 8.2% 5.4% telephone operators Source: Tendencias Digitales, February 2006 Distrust in means of 1.4% 3.9% 5.6% 2.6% 2.5% payment 073997 www.eMarketer.com Note: n=368 (Argentina), n=285 (Chile), n=1,045 (Colombia), n=429 (Peru), 073978 n=445 (Venezuela) Source: Tendencias Digitales, March 2006 073997 073546 www.eMarketer.com 073510 073546 Latin America Online 8
    • Usage As with Internet users worldwide, Latin Americans list e-mail as Online Activities among Internet Users in Mexico, the main reason they use the Internet, according to the 2005 (% of respondents) Tendencias Digitales study. Past 30 days More frequently E-Mail 45% 21% Main Reasons that Adults in Latin America Use the Listen to music 44% 24% Internet, November 2005-January 2006 (% of Download music 43% 24% respondents) Play games online 43% 17% Argentina Chile Colombia Peru Venezuela Visit humor sites 40% 15% Send and receive 47.3% 44.6% 56.2% 58.0% 35.1% e-mail Sports 35% 15% Look for general 8.2% 9.1% 6.2% 10.5% 19.1% Health 31% 13% information Read local news 28% 11% Look for 6.8% 3.9% 8.2% 7.9% 7.2% Get movie information 28% 10% information for work Source: AMIPCI, October 2005 In order to stay 9.5% 5.6% 1.5% 4.0% 7.6% 072560 www.eMarketer.com up to date 072560 Look for news 6.5% 9.1% 2.3% 1.6% 6.3% E-mail is used by nearly all Argentinian Internet users, according to To use instant 3.3% 4.6% 3.7% 2.3% 4.3% a July 2005 study by D’Alessio and Clarin.com. The same study messaging found that more than half of respondents also used the Internet to Note: n=368 (Argentina), n=285 (Chile), n=1,045 (Colombia), n=429 (Peru), n=445 (Venezuela) talk with distant friends or relatives and look for school /work Source: Tendencias Digitales, March 2006 information, among other activities. 073548 www.eMarketer.com 073548 Online Activities of Internet Users in Argentina, 2005 Respondents in the same study cited several of their favorite (% of respondents) Internet activities. Common activities included visiting adult Personal e-mail web sites, video games, using VoIP blogging and participating in , 98% e-mail lists. Look for information for school/work 89% Popular Internet Activities among Internet Users in Latin America, November 2005-January 2006 (% of E-Mail for work respondents) 73% Argentina Chile Colombia Peru Venezuela Talk with distant friends and relatives Visit adult Web sites 26.9% 44.2% 38.5% 37.5% 28.3% 66% Video games 30.4% 50.5% 33.3% 35.0% 33.9% Entertainment VoIP 24.5% 34.4% 33.0% 31.2% 26.1% 62% E-Mail lists 28.0% 32.6% 24.4% 42.7% 33.7% Download software to update programs Have or participate in a blog 23.1% 37.9% 21.6% 27.5% 24.3% 59% Bet online 1.4% 31.9% 2.6% 6.8% 3.6% Chat Online dating 5.7% 6.0% 5.6% 8.4% 5.2% 47% Podcasts 2.2% 6.3% 2.6% 4.7% 2.7% Note: n=368 (Argentina), n=285 (Chile), n=1,045 (Colombia), n=429 (Peru), Download music n=445 (Venezuela) 46% Source: Tendencias Digitales, March 2006 073550 www.eMarketer.com Play games online 073550 22% Mexican Internet users participate in a number of online activities, Find friends/relationships according to an October 2005 study by statistical agency AMIPCI. 13% Asked of their activities in the past 30 days, 40% or more Other respondents said that they had visited humor sites, played games 8% online, downloaded or listened to music and used e-mail. Source: D'Alessio and Clarin.com, July 2005 074213 www.eMarketer.com 074213 Latin America Online 9
    • Usage The study also found heavier usage of several Internet Online Activities of Internet Users in Brazil, by Age applications by respondents 25-34 compared to the rest of the and Gender, August 2005-September 2005 (% of population. For instance, 73% of 25-34 year-old Internet users in respondents in each group) Argentina had visited entertainment Web sites, compared to 47% Com- Training Informa- Leisure Interact Banking municate and tion with or of those 55 and older. education and govern- e-com- services ment merce Online Activities of Internet Users in Argentina, by Gender Age, 2005 (% of respondents) Male 84.66% 51.86% 80.95% 75.56% 31.70% 21.70% 25-34 35-44 45-54 55+ Female 78.69% 61.03% 80.97% 66.69% 24.74% 13.66% Download music 59% 41% 39% 22% Age Play games online 22% 21% 52% 47% 10-15 64.01% 65.16% 56.78% 80.70% - - Visit Web sites for entertainment 73% 63% 52% 47% 16-24 85.32% 63.43% 80.90% 76.07% 25.96% 29.59% Download software 68% 61% 56% 40% 25-34 88.13% 48.87% 85.29% 70.19% 39.99% 29.59% Chat 52% 41% 41% 41% 35-44 80.21% 49.24% 77.10% 68.14% 39.94% 18.15% Source: D'Alessio and Clarin.com, July 2005 45-59 87.34% 36.96% 82.75% 59.11% 43.52% 18.15% 074215 www.eMarketer.com 60+ 84.02% 25.60% 72.53% 77.02% 47.21% 23.57% 074215 Note: n=2,085 who have used the Internet in the past 3 months Using more general categories, in September 2005 Ipsos on behalf Source: Ipsos on behalf of Comité Gestor da Internet no Brasil (CGI), September 2005 of CGI asked Brazilian Internet users about their Internet activity. 074330 www.eMarketer.com 70% or more respondents said they did some type of leisure 074330 activity online, as well as information, training, education and Latin America has high online banking usage, according to communication activities. Tendencias Digitales. An average of 52% of Latin America Internet users used online banking in 2005. Online Activities of Internet Users in Brazil, August 2005-September 2005 (% of respondents) Internet Users in Select Countries in Latin America Communicate 81.67% Who Use Online Banking, November 2005-January 2006 (% of respondents) Training and education 56.45% Argentina Chile Colombia Peru Venezuela Information and services online 80.96% Have used, and use at the 42.4% 58.6% 55.1% 51.0% 56.9% moment Leisure 71.25% Have used, but do not use 10.3% 6.0% 14.0% 12.8% 12.8% Government 28.22% currently Have never used 47.3% 35.4% 30.9% 36.1% 30.3% Banking or e-commerce 17.68% Note: n=368 (Argentina), n=285 (Chile), n=1,045 (Colombia), n=429 (Peru), Note: n=2,085 who have used the Internet in the past 3 months n=445 (Venezuela) Source: Ipsos on behalf of Comité Gestor da Internet no Brasil (CGI), Source: Tendencias Digitales, March 2006 September 2005 073656 www.eMarketer.com 074327 www.eMarketer.com 073656 074327 Study respondents said that they banked online because it saved them time in line, was open at all hours, and was fast, easy and free. Main Reasons that Internet Users in Latin America Use Online Banking, November 2005-January 2006 (% of respondents) Argentina Chile Colombia Peru Venezuela Do not have to wait in line 87.8% 92.2% 93.2% 91.8% 88.5% Unlimited hours 78.2% 92.2% 81.6% 81.3% 81.4% Easy 68.6% 81.4% 77.6% 76.7% 77.9% Fast 58.3% 82.0% 70.7% 76.3% 70.4% Free 46.8% 58.7% 33.3% 68.5% 53.8% Note: n=368 (Argentina), n=285 (Chile), n=1,045 (Colombia), n=429 (Peru), n=445 (Venezuela) Source: Tendencias Digitales, March 2006 073659 www.eMarketer.com 073659 Latin America Online 10
    • Usage One activity clearly stands out among Latin American Internet Computer accessories, consumer electronics, books, CDs and users: they love to Instant Message (IM). Nearly two-thirds of DVDs are popular online purchases in Latin America, according to users in a February 2006 study by comScore Networks reported Tendencias Digitales. Far less common are computer and other using instant messaging programs—more than in Europe and electronics purchases. North America. Principal Items Purchased Online by Internet Users in Instant Messenger Users in Europe, North America Select Countries in Latin America, November and Latin America, February 2006 (% of Internet users 2005-January 2006 (% of respondents) in each region) Argentina Chile Colombia Peru Venezuela Computer accesories 38.6% 37.8% 40.0% 24.4% 39.9% Latin America 64% Books 44.3% 35.7% 24.7% 33.7% 31.3% Europe 49% CDs and DVDs 31.4% 34.7% 24.5% 28.0% 32.5% North America 37% Vacations 23.8% 43.4% 24.2% 28.0% 32.9% Source: comScore Networks Inc., April 2006 Tickets to events/movies 20.5% 25.0% 22.3% 13.5% 34.2% 072002 www.eMarketer.com Electronics 14.8% 10.7% 18.9% 7.8% 17.7% 072002 Computers and PDAs 10.5% 15.8% 17.7% 8.8% 18.1% Clothing and accesories 16.2% 11.7% 14.1% 13.5% 20.2% E-Commerce Magazines and documents 19.5% 15.3% 8.2% 16.1% 11.5% For a region trailing North America in broadband adoption, Latin Flowers 4.8% 16.3% 6.7% 25.9% 9.9% America is doing just fine in e-commerce, according to an October Mobile phones 9.5% 7.1% 9.6% 9.8% 9.9% 2005 study by AC Nielsen. The study found that 31% of Internet Toys 2.4% 9.7% 5.1% 3.6% 5.3% users had bought a book online during April or May 2005, 21% had Note: n=368 (Argentina), n=285 (Chile), n=1,045 (Colombia), n=429 (Peru), bought videos, DVDs, or games online, and 16% had made airline n=445 (Venezuela) Source: Tendencias Digitales, March 2006 reservations online. Although the revenue associated with these 073643 www.eMarketer.com purchases trails North America, the percentage of Internet users 073643 participating in these e-commerce activities nearly mirrored those In fact, when the same study examined e-commerce barriers, to the North. The region does lag somewhat in online clothes respondents often mentioned a preference for buying in the store, purchasing. Only 9% of respondents reported having bought clothes along with a distrust of online payment and delivery methods. online in Latin America, compared to 22% in North America. Barriers to E-Commerce in Select Countries in Latin Online Purchases Made by Internet Users in Select America, November 2005-January 2006 (% of Countries in the Americas, April-May 2005 (% of respondents) respondents) Argentina Chile Colombia Peru Venezuela Books Videos/ Airline Clothing Distrust in the means of 43.0% 40.4% 51.3% 50.4% 38.1% DVDs/ tickets/ accessories/ payment games reservations shoes Prefer to buy in the store 40.5% 41.6% 39.6% 36.0% 37.1% Canada 27% 21% 17% 17% It isn't neccesary 22.8% 31.5% 26.6% 20.8% 32.7% US 28% 22% 15% 25% Do not have a credit card 22.8% 37.1% 21.2% 20.8% 27.7% North America 28% 22% 16% 22% Like the personal treatment 32.2% 22.5% 23.2% 24.2% 25.2%% Brazil 45% 28% 15% 6% of a regular store Chile 11% 13% 18% 8% Distrust in delivery of the 18.4% 16.9% 30.5% 31.4% 27.7% Mexico 30% 20% 17% 13% product Latin America 31% 21% 16% 9% Distrust the quality of the 25.3% 12.4% 31.2% 26.3% 20.8% product Note: purchased in month prior to survey Source: ACNielsen, October 2005 Do not know how 3.8% 4.5% 5.4% 5.9% 5.4% 067816 www.eMarketer.com Note: n=368 (Argentina), n=285 (Chile), n=1,045 (Colombia), n=429 (Peru), 067816 n=445 (Venezuela) Source: Tendencias Digitales, March 2006 073654 www.eMarketer.com 073654 Latin America Online 11
    • Usage Latin America trails other global regions in the percentage of The study also found that slightly more Latin American males than Internet users who have ever made an online purchase, according females made purchases online, whereas in North America the to AC Nielsen. numbers were almost equal. The difference (8%) was slightly more than the gender difference in Internet user levels for Latin America Internet Users Worldwide Who Have Ever Made an overall (52% male, 48% female). Online Purchase, by Region, April-May 2005 (% of respondents) Internet Users in Select Countries in the Americas Europe 85% Who Have Ever Made an Online Purchase, by Gender, April-May 2005 (% of respondents in each group) North America 85% Male Female Asia-Pacific 70% Canada 80% 77% South Africa 74% US 89% 88% North America 86% 85% Latin America* 63% Brazil 85% 71% Worldwide** 77% Chile 51% 50% Note: *Brazil, Chile and Mexico; **includes 38 countries Mexico 66% 55% Source: ACNielsen, October 2005 Latin America 67% 59% 067785 www.eMarketer.com Source: ACNielsen, October 2005 067785 067811 www.eMarketer.com The same study found that Latin American online buyers 067811 made fewer purchases in April-May 2005 than online buyers in US Internet retailers do not make a lot of foreign online sales to other regions. Latin American countries. This is likely because most US Web sites are in English. Even discounting payment and delivery concerns, Average Number of Online Purchases Made in the Past Month by Online Buyers Worldwide, by Region, site translation and localization are obvious barriers when trying to April-May 2005 sell abroad. Europe 5.1 Countries Where US Internet Retailers Make Most of Asia-Pacific 4.9 Their Foreign Online Sales, April 2005 (% of respondents) North America 4.3 United Kingdom South Africa 4.1 46.9% Latin America* 3.1 Japan Worldwide** 4.9 8.5% Note: *Brazil, Chile and Mexico; **includes 38 countries Germany Source: ACNielsen, October 2005 4.8% 067786 www.eMarketer.com 067786 Australia 3.8% France 3.8% Mexico 3.1% China 1.5% India 1.5% Italy 0.8% Other 25.4% Note: reflects only those surveyed who process foreign orders Source: Internet Retailer, WebSurveyor, May 2005 064807 www.eMarketer.com 064807 Latin America Online 12
    • Usage The October 2005 AC Nielsen study found two payment methods AMIPCI found about a third of online purchases in Mexico were for used online in Latin America that are almost unheard of in North around $50 (400-1,000 pesos). Another 23% of online purchases America: bank transfers and COD. Debit card payments for online were between $90-$270. Only 12% of purchases were for more purchases, on the other hand, stood at only 9%, compared to 22% than that. This is a fair spread of purchase amounts, although the in North America. reluctance of Latin American buyers across countries to buy computers or electronics online still indicates a general distrust of Payment Methods Used by Online Buyers in Select making large purchases remotely. Countries in the Americas, April-May 2005 (% of respondents) Online Purchases in Mexico, by Amount Spent, 2005 Credit Bank Cash on PayPal Debit (% of total) card transfer delivery cards (COD) Canada 79% 3% 4% 33% 2% <150 3,000+ pesos US 64% 4% 1% 26% 31% pesos 8% 12% North America 69% 4% 2% 29% 22% 150 pesos- 1,000 pesos- 400 pesos Brazil 65% 13% 0% 39% 6% 3,000 pesos 21% Chile 61% 8% 7% 2% 4% 23% Mexico 61% 16% 17% 5% 17% 400 pesos- Latin America 63% 13% 7% 18% 9% 1,000 pesos 36% Source: ACNielsen, October 2005 067807 www.eMarketer.com Source: AMIPCI, October 2005 067807 072562 www.eMarketer.com Bank tarjeto de credito (credit cards) are the most popular means 072562 for paying for online purchases in Mexico, according to AMIPCI. In Brazil, the overwhelming majority (84.52%) of respondents to a September 2005 study by Ipsos (on behalf of CGI) said that they Online Purchases in Mexico, by Method of Payment, 2005 (% of total) had never made an online purchase. Bank credit card 45% When Online Buyers in Brazil Made Their Last Online Purchase, August 2005-September 2005 (% of Deposit 34% respondents) Cash (COD) 10% Within the last 3 months 6.96% Commercial credit card 4% 3-6 months ago 2.95% Check 1% 6-12 months ago 1.81% Other 6% 12+ months ago 3.76% Source: AMIPCI, October 2005 Never 84.52% 072561 www.eMarketer.com 072561 Note: n=2,753 who have used the Internet in the past 12 months Source: Ipsos on behalf of Comité Gestor da Internet no Brasil (CGI), September 2005 074324 www.eMarketer.com 074324 Latin America Online 13
    • Usage Demographics D’Alessio and Clarin.com asked Argentinian online shoppers in Who uses the Internet in Latin America? In July 2005 about a range of purchase types. The survey found that although many researched purchases online, they were more Argentina, users are more likely to be younger likely to make the actual purchase offline. A few exceptions than the rest of the population, according to a July occurred in the most popular e-commerce categories: computer 2005 study by D’Alessio and Clarin.com. software, books, online music and auctions were all equally or more likely to be purchased online after online research. Demographic Profile of Internet Users in Argentina, 2005 (% of respondents) Online Shopping Habits of Online Shoppers in Age Argentina, by Category, May 2005 (% of respondents) <24 46% Research Buy Buy online online offline 25-34 20% 35-44 13% Household appliances 55% 35% 49% 45-54 10% Education 54% 12% 17% 55+ 11% Computer hardware 50% 38% 49% Gender Subscriptions to courses, events 48% 30% 17% Sports 47% 8% 42% Male 52% Books 46% 33% 21% Female 48% Home decorations 43% 12% 19% Source: D'Alessio and Clarin.com, July 2005 073802 www.eMarketer.com Travel 42% 18% 34% 073802 Financial services 42% 23% 31% In Brazil, IBOPE found in a May 2005 study that slightly more males AFJP (Administradora de Fondos de 39% 1% 19% Jubilaciones y Pensiones) than females used the Internet. Only 13.1% of Internet users were Telecommunications 37% 17% 15% 50 or older—and over 27% were minors. Online music 35% 27% 5% Items for family members 33% 9% 19% Demographic Profile of Internet Users in Brazil, May 2006 (% of respondents) Vehicles 32% 3% 11% Gender Health, medical systems, pharaceuticals 32% 3% 12% Male 54.00% Computer software 30% 20% 12% Female 46.00% Event tickets 27% 19% 19% Age Food (general) 27% 13% 27% Clothing 26% 9% 22% 2-11 10.67% Food (delivery) 26% 17% 25% 12-17 16.64% Auctions, sales 24% 34% 9% 18-24 17.05% Newspaper/magazine subscriptions 24% 20% 12% 25-34 18.81% Insurance 22% 6% 10% 35-49 23.73% Videos 22% 11% 11% 50-64 11.20% Other 2% 3% 2% 65+ 1.90% Source: D'Alessio and Clarin.com, July 2005 Source: IBOPE, May 2005 074058 www.eMarketer.com 074362 www.eMarketer.com 074058 074362 Latin America Online 14
    • Demographics Online Advertising and Marketing AMIPCI’s 2005 study of Internet users ages 6-64 in Mexico found According to ZenithOptimedia, total advertising 93% were 44 or younger. spending in Latin America has slowed in recent Internet Users in Mexico, by Age, 2005 (% of total) years Ad spending is expected to continue slowing through 2008 when it will achieve 5.5% growth. 45-64 6-12 35-44 7% 8% 12% Advertising Spending Worldwide, by Region, 13-18 2004-2008 (% increase vs. prior year) 23% 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 25-34 North America 6.1% 3.0% 5.2% 4.2% 3.9% 25% 19-24 US only 6.0% 2.9% 5.2% 4.2% 4.0% 25% Europe 6.4% 3.7% 4.2% 4.2% 4.2% Asia-Pacific 6.5% 5.5% 6.8% 7.4% 6.7% Source: AMIPCI, October 2005 Latin America 13.4% 15.9% 9.6% 6.8% 5.5% 072556 www.eMarketer.com Africa, Middle East, Rest of World 27.7% 16.8% 15.9% 14.1% 14.8% 072556 Worldwide 7.4% 4.9% 6.0% 5.6% 5.3% The AMIPCI study also found more males than females use Note: includes newspapers, magazines, television, radio, cinema, outdoor the Internet. and Internet Source: ZenithOptimedia, April 2006 072007 www.eMarketer.com Internet Users in Mexico, by Gender, 2005 (% of total) Online Advertising and Internet Access Spending in Select Countries and Regions Worldwide, 2004-2010 (millions and % increase vs. prior year) Female 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 41% US $36,343 $40,209 $45,081 $49,950 $53,825 $57,244 $60,168 % change 18.2% 10.6% 12.1% 10.8% 7.8% 6.4% 5.1% EMEA $42,180 $49,524 $59,942 $64,227 $71,365 $77,838 $83,421 Male 59% % change 27.9% 17.4% 15.0% 12.8% 11.1% 9.1% 7.2% Asia- $37,656 $48,418 $59,886 $72,905 $85,802 $98,246 $110,282 Pacific Source: AMIPCI, October 2005 % change 36.2% 28.6% 23.7% 21.7% 17.7% 14.5% 12.3% 072555 www.eMarketer.com Latin $3,469 $4,341 $5,261 $6,156 $6,990 $7,815 $8,581 072555 -America % change 31.5% 25.1% 21.2% 17.0% 13.5% 11.8% 9.8% In Venezuela, a February 2006 study by Datanalisis and Tendencias Canada $1,717 $2,021 $2,274 $2,525 $2,744 $2,922 $3,109 Digitales again found more males than females use the Internet. % change 16.1% 17.7% 12.5% 11.0% 8.7% 6.5% 6.4% The study found that 61% of the country’s Internet users were 21 World- $121,365 $144,513 $169,444 $195,763 $220,726 $244,065 $265,561 or younger. wide % change 27.1% 19.1% 17.3% 15.5% 12.8% 10.6% 8.8% Demographic Profile of Internet Users in Venezuela, Source: PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), Wilkofsky Gruen Associates, June December 2005 (% of respondents) 2006 Gender 074053 www.eMarketer.com Male 55% 072007 074053 Female 45% The story in the online sector is different. According to Age PricewaterhouseCoopers, online ad spending in Latin America will 12-17 31% increase from $181 million in 2005 to $512 million in 2010. 18-21 30% 25-34 23% Online Advertising Spending in Latin America, 2005 & 2010 (millions) 35-49 16% 50+ 1% 2005 $181 Source: Tendencias Digitales, February 2006 2010 $512 073991 www.eMarketer.com 073991 Note: CAGR=18.7% Source: PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), June 2006 074091 www.eMarketer.com 074091 Latin America Online 15
    • Online Advertising and Marketing The March 2006 Tendencias Digitales report found better ad recall by Internet users of ads for articles for sale and vehicles than for other types of products and services. No category had overwhelming recall, as even the vehicle ads were recalled by 12.6% of respondents at best. Products Advertised Online that Are Most Recalled by Internet Users in Select Countries in Latin America, November 2005-January 2006 (% of respondents) Argentina Chile Colombia Peru Venezuela Articles for sale 10.3% 3.6% 16.1% 9.0% 13.4% Cellphones and accesories 4.0% 5.8% 9.0% 9.5% 6.7% Vehicles 12.6% 3.6% 7.6% 5.4% 5.2% Auctions 8.0% 2.9% 7.7% 0.5% 4.9% Vacations/tourism 4.6% 5.8% 5.3% 6.8% 4.9% Computers and accesories 2.9% 7.2% 5.3% 3.6% 5.6% Financial services 1.7% 7.9% 1.9% 2.3% 7.5% Visa lottery (for US) 2.3% 1.4% 1.9% 6.8% 4.1% Free mail 1.1% 0.0% 2.6% 2.3% 3.0% Electronics 2.9% 0.0% 2.7% 0.9% 1.5% Note: n=368 (Argentina), n=285 (Chile), n=1,045 (Colombia), n=429 (Peru), n=445 (Venezuela) Source: Tendencias Digitales, March 2006 073766 www.eMarketer.com 073766 The major online annoyance of Internet users in Latin America is anything that interrupts their online experience, according to Tendencias Digitales. Popups and interstitial ads would fall into this category, as would anything that makes a page load slowly, such as a large flash animation. Aspects of Online Ads Most Disliked by Internet Users in Select Countries in Latin America, November 2005-January 2006 (% of respondents) Argentina Chile Colombia Peru Venezuela Interference, bother 28.5% 22.8% 11.2% 11.4% 12.1% Pop-ups 7.3% 13.0% 14.0% 13.1% 14.4% Spam 5.4% 9.5% 5.9% 12.1% 5.4% Banners 6.8% 8.8% 6.0% 5.4% 6.5% Goods and services 3.3% 3.5% 5.6% 2.6% 2.2% False publications 1.1% 2.5% 4.0% 3.7% 4.3% Misleading advertisements 1.9% 3.5% 2.8% 3.7% 2.0% Offers, discounts 1.1% 4.6% 2.6% 2.8% 2.2% Specific products 3.0% 0.4% 5.8% 5.4% 5.6% Note: n=368 (Argentina), n=285 (Chile), n=1,045 (Colombia), n=429 (Peru), n=445 (Venezuela) Source: Tendencias Digitales, March 2006 073769 www.eMarketer.com 073769 For more information about broadband worldwide, see eMarketer’s “Worldwide Online Access: 2004-2010” report at: http://www.emarketer.com/Reports/Viewer.aspx?bband_ world_jun06&autodetect=Y Latin America Online 16
    • Related Information and Links Related Charts Suggested Keywords for eStat Database The EIU ViewsWire Latin America Argentina http://www.viewswire.com Brazil Mexico Tendencias Digitales Broadband E-Commerce http://www.tendenciasdigitales.com Contact D'Alessio and Clarin.com (Argentina) eMarketer, Inc. Toll-Free: 800-405-0844 http://www.dalessio.com.ar/ 75 Broad Street Outside the US: 212-763-6010 32nd floor Fax: 212-763-6020 Ipsos on behalf of Comité Gestor da Internet no Brasil New York, NY 10004 sales@emarketer.com (CGI) http://www.cg.org.br/ Report Contributors AMIPCI (Mexico) Mike Chapman Editorial Director http://amipci.org.mx/ Kevin Godin Researcher Dana Hill Production Artist Related Charts James Ku Data Entry Associate (as found in eMarketer’s eStat database) and Production Artist Yael Marmon Director of Research Packaged Software Spending in Latin America, 2004- Hilary Rengert Senior Researcher 2009 (billions) and Production Artist Allison Smith Senior Editor http://www.emarketer.com/Chart.aspx?50044 Tracy Tang Senior Researcher PC Software Piracy in Latin America, by Country, 2005 http://www.emarketer.com/Chart.aspx?54151 Telecom Spending in Latin America, 2004-2009 (billions and % increase vs. prior year) http://www.emarketer.com/Chart.aspx?50040 Mobile Phone Penetration in Latin America, 2004-2009 (% of population) http://www.emarketer.com/Chart.aspx?46620 Digital Content Valued Most by Consumers in Select Countries Worldwide, February-March 2006 (% of respondents) http://www.emarketer.com/Chart.aspx?54633 Latin America Online 17
    • About eMarketer eMarketer is The First Place to Look for market research information related to the Internet, e-business, online marketing and emerging technologies. eMarketer aggregates and analyzes e-business research from over 2,000 sources, and brings it together in analyst reports, daily research articles and the eStat Database – the most comprehensive database of e-business and online marketing statistics in the world. eMarketer's Core Expertise eMarketer specializes in researching and sorting vast amounts of publicly-available information, and objectively compiling and analyzing this information into widely read reports, articles and newsletters. Our information products help business executives worldwide make smarter, faster decisions about online marketing, emerging technologies and e-business. Dedicated Team Our team of researchers and analysts comb through Web sites, data repositories and government statistics, uniquely providing a 360-degree overview of available data, combined with original analysis that is quickly accessible, comprehensive, objective, actionable, cost-effective and, most of all, intelligent. A Trusted Resource eMarketer serves as a trusted, third-party resource, cutting through the clutter and hype – helping businesses make sense of the e-business numbers and trends. eMarketer's products and services help companies make better, more informed business decisions by: s Streamlining e-business research sources and reducing costs s Eliminating critical data gaps s Providing an objective, bird’s eye view of the entire e-business landscape s Better deploying and sharing information across the company s Building solid business cases backed up by hard data s Reducing business risk s Saving valuable time To learn more about subscriptions to eMarketer, call 800-405-0844 (outside the U.S. and Canada, call 001-212-763-6010), or e-mail to sales@emarketer.com. Latin America Online 18