<ul><li>‘ It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data.’ </li></ul><ul><li>-Sir Arthur Conan Doyle as Sherlock ...
Selecting Appropriate Data Collection Methods Chapter 6
Data Collection Options <ul><li>Data collection possibilities are wide and varied with any one method of collection not in...
The Data Collection Process <ul><li>All methods of collection require rigorous and systematic design and execution that in...
Surveys <ul><li>Surveying involves gathering information from individuals using a questionnaire </li></ul><ul><li>Surveys ...
Survey Types <ul><li>Surveys can be  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>descriptive or explanatory </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>involve e...
Survey Construction <ul><li>Survey construction involves </li></ul><ul><ul><li>formulating questions and response categori...
Interviewing <ul><li>Interviewing involves asking respondents a series of open-ended   questions </li></ul><ul><li>Intervi...
Interview Types <ul><li>Interviews can range from </li></ul><ul><ul><li>formal to informal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>stru...
Conducting Interviews <ul><li>When conducting your interviews you will need to  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>question, prompt, an...
Observation <ul><li>Observation relies on the researchers’ ability to gather data though their senses - and allows researc...
Observation Types <ul><li>Observation can range from </li></ul><ul><ul><li>non-participant to participant </li></ul></ul><...
The Observation Process <ul><li>The observation process is sometimes treated casually, but is a method that needs to be tr...
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Selecting appropriate data collection methods

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Selecting appropriate data collection methods

  1. 1. <ul><li>‘ It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data.’ </li></ul><ul><li>-Sir Arthur Conan Doyle as Sherlock Holmes </li></ul>O'Leary, Z. (2005) RESEARCHING REAL-WORLD PROBLEMS: A Guide to Methods of Inquiry. London: Sage. Chapter 6.
  2. 2. Selecting Appropriate Data Collection Methods Chapter 6
  3. 3. Data Collection Options <ul><li>Data collection possibilities are wide and varied with any one method of collection not inherently better than any other </li></ul><ul><li>Each has pros and cons that must be weighed up in view of a rich and complex context </li></ul>O'Leary, Z. (2005) RESEARCHING REAL-WORLD PROBLEMS: A Guide to Methods of Inquiry. London: Sage. Chapter 6.
  4. 4. The Data Collection Process <ul><li>All methods of collection require rigorous and systematic design and execution that includes </li></ul><ul><ul><li>thorough planning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>well considered development </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>effective piloting </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>weighed modification </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>deliberate implementation and execution </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>appropriate management and analysis </li></ul></ul>O'Leary, Z. (2005) RESEARCHING REAL-WORLD PROBLEMS: A Guide to Methods of Inquiry. London: Sage. Chapter 6.
  5. 5. Surveys <ul><li>Surveying involves gathering information from individuals using a questionnaire </li></ul><ul><li>Surveys can </li></ul><ul><ul><li>reach a large number of respondents </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>generate standardized, quantifiable, empirical data - as well as some qualitative data </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>and offer confidentiality / anonymity </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Designing survey instruments capable of generating credible data, however, can be difficult </li></ul>O'Leary, Z. (2005) RESEARCHING REAL-WORLD PROBLEMS: A Guide to Methods of Inquiry. London: Sage. Chapter 6.
  6. 6. Survey Types <ul><li>Surveys can be </li></ul><ul><ul><li>descriptive or explanatory </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>involve entire populations or samples of populations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>capture a moment or map trends </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>can be administered in a number of ways </li></ul></ul>O'Leary, Z. (2005) RESEARCHING REAL-WORLD PROBLEMS: A Guide to Methods of Inquiry. London: Sage. Chapter 6.
  7. 7. Survey Construction <ul><li>Survey construction involves </li></ul><ul><ul><li>formulating questions and response categories </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>writing up background information and instruction </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>working through organization and length </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>determining layout and design </li></ul></ul>O'Leary, Z. (2005) RESEARCHING REAL-WORLD PROBLEMS: A Guide to Methods of Inquiry. London: Sage. Chapter 6.
  8. 8. Interviewing <ul><li>Interviewing involves asking respondents a series of open-ended questions </li></ul><ul><li>Interviews can generate both standardized quantifiable data, and more in-depth qualitative data </li></ul><ul><li>However, the complexities of people and the complexities of communication can create many opportunities for miscommunication and misinterpretation </li></ul>O'Leary, Z. (2005) RESEARCHING REAL-WORLD PROBLEMS: A Guide to Methods of Inquiry. London: Sage. Chapter 6.
  9. 9. Interview Types <ul><li>Interviews can range from </li></ul><ul><ul><li>formal to informal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>structured to unstructured </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>can be one on one or involve groups </li></ul></ul>O'Leary, Z. (2005) RESEARCHING REAL-WORLD PROBLEMS: A Guide to Methods of Inquiry. London: Sage. Chapter 6.
  10. 10. Conducting Interviews <ul><li>When conducting your interviews you will need to </li></ul><ul><ul><li>question, prompt, and probe in ways that help you gather rich data </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>actively listen and make sense of what is being said </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>manage the overall process </li></ul></ul>O'Leary, Z. (2005) RESEARCHING REAL-WORLD PROBLEMS: A Guide to Methods of Inquiry. London: Sage. Chapter 6.
  11. 11. Observation <ul><li>Observation relies on the researchers’ ability to gather data though their senses - and allows researchers to document actual behaviour rather than responses related to behaviour </li></ul><ul><li>However, the observed can act differently when surveilled, and observations can be tainted by a researcher’s worldview </li></ul>O'Leary, Z. (2005) RESEARCHING REAL-WORLD PROBLEMS: A Guide to Methods of Inquiry. London: Sage. Chapter 6.
  12. 12. Observation Types <ul><li>Observation can range from </li></ul><ul><ul><li>non-participant to participant </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>candid to covert </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>from structured to unstructured </li></ul></ul>O'Leary, Z. (2005) RESEARCHING REAL-WORLD PROBLEMS: A Guide to Methods of Inquiry. London: Sage. Chapter 6.
  13. 13. The Observation Process <ul><li>The observation process is sometimes treated casually, but is a method that needs to be treated as rigorously as any other </li></ul><ul><li>The process should include planning, observing, recording, reflecting, and authenticating </li></ul>O'Leary, Z. (2005) RESEARCHING REAL-WORLD PROBLEMS: A Guide to Methods of Inquiry. London: Sage. Chapter 6.
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