<ul><li>One in six children in the  </li></ul><ul><li>United States </li></ul><ul><li>lives in poverty… </li></ul>
Families are the fastest growing segment of the homeless population in the U.S. – 40%
Thirty-six million people, including 14 million children, experience hunger…
About 41 million people do not  have health insurance…
How do families end up homeless? <ul><li>Emergencies- fire, storm, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Loss of job </li></ul><ul><li>Fa...
Homeless and Children <ul><li>Children born into homelessness are more likely to have low birth weights due to disease and...
What is Family Promise? <ul><li>Founded in New Jersey in 1988 to address the growing need to provide emergency sheltering,...
Family Promise Programs <ul><li>As our name suggests, we focus our efforts on assisting homeless and low-income families a...
Interfaith Hospitality Network <ul><li>Our Networks of volunteers provide shelter, meals, and support services to homeless...
Facts & Figures about Interfaith Hospitality Networks <ul><li>More than 5000 congregations are involved in Family Promise ...
Facts & Figures about Interfaith Hospitality Networks <ul><li>25% of adult guest family members have found jobs.  (Over 60...
Besides IHN, what are the other options for the homeless?   <ul><li>Shelters- sometimes house those with substance abuse o...
Basic Components <ul><li>Host Congregations . Ten to thirteen host congregations provide overnight (from 5:30pm to 7am) ac...
What is involved in  volunteering with the Interfaith Hospitality Network (Family Promise) ? <ul><li>Bringing in a meal an...
Coverage of Family Promise
Program Advantages <ul><li>Enables Homeless Families to Regain their Independence </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The active involve...
More advantages <ul><li>Increases Community Commitment to Solving Local Problems </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The Network provide...
More advantages <ul><li>Fosters Other Community Initiatives Congregations and individuals in the program are often motivat...
  Steps to Creating a Network <ul><li>Recruit 10 to 13 host congregations </li></ul><ul><li>Secure a day center </li></ul>...
Core Group Committees <ul><li>Core group committees focus on specific components of the Network program. Each committee ha...
Summary of IHN Program Benefits <ul><li>For Guests </li></ul><ul><li>Safe, homelike shelter where families can stay togeth...
Summary of IHN Program Benefits <ul><li>For Congregations </li></ul><ul><li>Opportunity for outreach (within the congregat...
Typical Volunteer Schedule for the Host Facility <ul><li>5:30-8:30pm- Supper and Evening Volunteers </li></ul><ul><li>8:30...
Supplies Needed <ul><li>The Network provides much of the essential equipment: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Folding cots, blankets...
Cost to the Host Congregation <ul><li>Cost of food staples, utilities and supplies averages $200 for the Host Week (but mu...
Frequently Asked Questions…
<ul><li>How many host congregations are needed to form a Network?  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A Network needs 10 to 13 host con...
<ul><li>We don’t have a day center in our community. How should we go about finding one? </li></ul><ul><li>Most operating ...
<ul><li>How do we handle transportation ? </li></ul><ul><li>Networks usually purchase a van, or a van is loaned or donated...
<ul><li>Can we use volunteer van drivers?   </li></ul><ul><li>Family Promise  does not recommend using volunteer drivers. ...
<ul><li>What facilities do host congregations need to have for guests?  </li></ul><ul><li>Facilities must include: </li></...
<ul><li>Our building is in use almost all the time. How will we find the space? </li></ul><ul><li>Churches and synagogues ...
<ul><li>Can families’ belongings be moved in the morning and moved back in the evening to permit the congregation to use t...
<ul><li>How long do families stay in the Network? </li></ul><ul><li>The Guest Guidelines call for a maximum stay of 30 day...
<ul><li>Where do guest families stay during the day on weekends? </li></ul><ul><li>In most Networks, families stay at the ...
<ul><li>How are families referred to the Network? </li></ul><ul><li>Two weeks before the Network opens,  the Network direc...
<ul><li>Isn’t it difficult for families to move week to week? </li></ul><ul><li>Moving every week isn’t ideal, but most fa...
<ul><li>Will the children miss school because their families are staying in different congregations every week or two? </l...
<ul><li>  What are the insurance implications of    participating in the Network? Does the    congregation have to amend i...
<ul><li>How much money is needed to start a Network? </li></ul><ul><li>First-year budgets can  range from $90,000 to $125,...
<ul><li>How do we raise the money? </li></ul><ul><li>Funds are  raised locally from individuals, congregations, foundation...
<ul><li>How long does it take to develop a Network? </li></ul><ul><li>Some Networks have developed in 10 months, while oth...
<ul><li>Do we really need to hire a full-time Network director? Can’t a staff member from another agency manage the Networ...
<ul><li>What are some advantages of the Network program over a more traditional shelter? </li></ul><ul><li>An Interfaith H...
Contact Information <ul><li>If you would like more information on the Network program, please contact: </li></ul><ul><li>F...
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Family Promise Presentation

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A general powerpoint used to explain the mission of Family Promise and the 5 programs that make up the organization - Interfaith Hospitality Network, Family Mentoring, Just Neighbors, Community Initiatives and Voices Uniting - which enable it to help homeless families nationwide.

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Family Promise Presentation

  1. 2. <ul><li>One in six children in the </li></ul><ul><li>United States </li></ul><ul><li>lives in poverty… </li></ul>
  2. 3. Families are the fastest growing segment of the homeless population in the U.S. – 40%
  3. 4. Thirty-six million people, including 14 million children, experience hunger…
  4. 5. About 41 million people do not have health insurance…
  5. 6. How do families end up homeless? <ul><li>Emergencies- fire, storm, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Loss of job </li></ul><ul><li>Family medical expenses- lack of medical benefits </li></ul><ul><li>Unexpected expenses- car, repairs, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Changes is living arrangements </li></ul><ul><li>Loss of spouse through death or abandonment </li></ul><ul><li>Divorce or separation </li></ul><ul><li>Disagreement with those who a family may be staying </li></ul>
  6. 7. Homeless and Children <ul><li>Children born into homelessness are more likely to have low birth weights due to disease and illness in overcrowded conditions ( Family Housing Fund) </li></ul><ul><li>Homeless children are 6 times more likely to have stunted growth and 7 times more likely to be anemic ( Family Housing Fund) </li></ul><ul><li>Homeless children are more likely to have serious acute and chronic illnesses than other low-income children... </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Homeless children frequently lack adequate access to ongoing primary health care - a medical home. Their need for medical specialty referral…is very high. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Homeless families typically have enormous difficulty keeping specialist appointments, with as few as 5% to 10% of appointments kept. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This further compromises child health status and may affect school attendance and performance. (Children's Health Fund). </li></ul></ul><ul><li>As might be expected in families that move frequently, homeless children are often behind in their immunizations (Wood, 1992) </li></ul>
  7. 8. What is Family Promise? <ul><li>Founded in New Jersey in 1988 to address the growing need to provide emergency sheltering, meals, and comprehensive assistance to homeless families. </li></ul><ul><li>A Network with volunteers at the heart of it </li></ul><ul><li>Actively involving those in faith communities in the needs of low income families- especially children </li></ul><ul><li>“ This is a ministry that allows volunteers to put names with faces, to share a meal, to listen to a story, to help with homework, to pour a cup of coffee in the morning before a family sets out for the day, and through it all we discover how much we have in common, and we are reminded that even in tough times God is faithful.” </li></ul><ul><li>--Rev. Renee Hoke, Kingwood Christian Church, Kingwood TX </li></ul><ul><li>The Program offers a hand up, not a hand out… </li></ul>
  8. 9. Family Promise Programs <ul><li>As our name suggests, we focus our efforts on assisting homeless and low-income families and to address the factors that perpetuate poverty. In response to the needs of families, we have expanded our commitment to five programs. </li></ul><ul><li>Interfaith Hospitality Network </li></ul><ul><li>Just Neighbors - Our interactive educational curriculum raises awareness of poverty and homelessness and their root causes as the first step in engaging communities in helping low-income people. </li></ul><ul><li>Family Mentoring - Our mentoring model trains volunteers to advise and advocate for at-risk families, helping them achieve and maintain self-sufficiency. </li></ul><ul><li>Community Initiatives - From the common basic beginning of providing shelter, meals, and support services to homeless families, many Networks go on to do much more. Some of these have included transitional housing, parenting classes, and a high school equivalency exam program. </li></ul><ul><li>Voices Uniting - The Voices Uniting program mobilizes and supports IHN clergy, volunteers, and former guests as advocates for public policies that alleviate poverty and promote economic stability of low-income families. </li></ul>
  9. 10. Interfaith Hospitality Network <ul><li>Our Networks of volunteers provide shelter, meals, and support services to homeless families. Each Network program is a partnership mobilizing community resources: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>houses of worship for lodging, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>congregations for volunteers, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>social service agencies for assessment and referrals, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>existing facilities for day programs. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Networks are extremely cost-effective. With the exception of the paid Director and case manager, volunteers donate all the time, labor, and supplies needed to run the Network. </li></ul><ul><li>Volunteers are the heart of the Network program. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>They are essential to our philosophy of offering dignified and compassionate assistance. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They furnish meals, overnight lodging . . .. and hope. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They help families find jobs, help them find and furnish housing, and assist them financially with security deposits. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Each Network program includes 10 to 13 houses of worship and 800 to 1,000 volunteers. Host congregations provide overnight shelter, meals, and support services to three to five families for one week every two to three months on a rotating schedule. Each Network can serve approximately 175 homeless family members annually. </li></ul>
  10. 11. Facts & Figures about Interfaith Hospitality Networks <ul><li>More than 5000 congregations are involved in Family Promise programs. </li></ul><ul><li>Over 125,000 volunteers are involved in Network programs. </li></ul><ul><li>More than 270,000 homeless family members have been helped by IHN programs. </li></ul><ul><li>75% of guest families have found permanent housing. </li></ul><ul><li>In a typical Network, half of the guests are children, most of whom are under six years old. </li></ul>
  11. 12. Facts & Figures about Interfaith Hospitality Networks <ul><li>25% of adult guest family members have found jobs. (Over 60% of guest families have at least one family member already employed when they enter the IHN.) </li></ul><ul><li>There are 162 Networks and 151 Affiliate locations in 39 states and DC. </li></ul><ul><li>As an outgrowth of the Network, over 400 direct service and housing programs have been developed. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1992, Family Promise received the President ’ s Annual Points of Light Award for being one of the top twenty volunteer agencies in the country. </li></ul>
  12. 13. Besides IHN, what are the other options for the homeless? <ul><li>Shelters- sometimes house those with substance abuse or mental illness or a criminal background </li></ul><ul><li>Motel vouchers- expensive, lack basic amenities, and are sometimes used for things that are not suitable for children to be around </li></ul><ul><li>Family shelters- sometimes separate fathers and sons as young as ten into men’s facilities, thus separating the family </li></ul><ul><li>“ When I first learned I would be in a shelter, I automatically pictured a ‘shelter’. But what I found were caring and concerned people who made the darkest time in my life so much brighter. The help and guidance I received is beyond words.” </li></ul><ul><li>Dorothy O., Former Guest, Union County NJ IHN </li></ul>
  13. 14. Basic Components <ul><li>Host Congregations . Ten to thirteen host congregations provide overnight (from 5:30pm to 7am) accommodations and meals to families (up to fourteen people) on a rotating schedule. </li></ul><ul><li>Volunteers . About 50 volunteers are involved during each host week. A primary coordinator, working with one to three assistant coordinators, oversees the Network program within each congregation. </li></ul><ul><li>Community Agencies . Local agencies assess and refer guests to the Network program and work with the Network director to coordinate needed services for guest families. </li></ul><ul><li>Day Center . During the day, families receive case management at a central location near housing and employment opportunities. The Day Center is often housed in a Y or downtown congregational facility. </li></ul><ul><li>Transportation . The Network provides transportation between the host congregations and the day center. </li></ul>
  14. 15. What is involved in volunteering with the Interfaith Hospitality Network (Family Promise) ? <ul><li>Bringing in a meal and eating with families in the program </li></ul><ul><li>Spending a few hours playing with children </li></ul><ul><li>Providing a special skill, like computer training or resume writing </li></ul><ul><li>Staying overnight at a facility—sleeping in a private room and being available in case of emergency </li></ul><ul><li>Supporting parents under incredible stress while they get their lives back together </li></ul><ul><li>Inviting others to join you </li></ul><ul><li>“ We’re all doing so much, so fast, so much of the time—that it gives you the chance to stop and look at what’s important. It really brings it home to you. There are so many things we take for granted—things like home cooked meals or a safe place to sleep. By volunteering at IHN, we get to see first hand what a difference these things make in the lives of others, and we learn to appreciate them all over again.” </li></ul><ul><li>Mary Lu Barth, Volunteer, Temple Beth Emerth, Ann Arbor IHN </li></ul>
  15. 16. Coverage of Family Promise
  16. 17. Program Advantages <ul><li>Enables Homeless Families to Regain their Independence </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The active involvement of volunteers in the Network not only provides emergency services such as shelter and meals, but also offers supportive services ranging from assistance in finding housing and jobs to ongoing support once a family has secured housing. This personal commitment has contributed to one of Family Promise’s most rewarding statistics: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Overall, more than 75% of the guests in the Network do find long-term housing . </li></ul></ul>
  17. 18. More advantages <ul><li>Increases Community Commitment to Solving Local Problems </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The Network provides practical, concrete ways for volunteers to work in the safe, familiar environment of their own house of worship. Despite the alleged phenomenon of “compassion fatigue,” Family Promise mobilizes thousands of volunteers who provide direct services through its Networks. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Many local Network members volunteer as family units, with children ranging from toddlers to teens. As a result, Family Promise is helping to train a new generation to give something of themselves to others. </li></ul></ul>The Interfaith approach does a lot for the community ecumenically…
  18. 19. More advantages <ul><li>Fosters Other Community Initiatives Congregations and individuals in the program are often motivated to develop additional programs including transitional housing and affordable housing, parenting and children’s programs, employment or budget counseling. </li></ul><ul><li>Alternative to Shelter By mobilizing existing community resources, Network programs avoid institutionalizing large and impersonal shelters as a permanent solution to homelessness. </li></ul><ul><li>Provides Services Cost-Effectively The involvement of thousands of volunteers and the use of existing community resources enable Networks to provide services at a fraction of the average national cost. On average the Networks spend $14.00 per person per day to provide shelter, meals and comprehensive support services. </li></ul><ul><li>“ IHN saved my life. Without it, I don’t know what my children and I would have done. Everyone makes you feel welcome, while still respecting your privacy. It’s just wonderful having a place you can call ‘home’.” </li></ul><ul><li>Carlas, Guest, Durham, NC </li></ul>
  19. 20. Steps to Creating a Network <ul><li>Recruit 10 to 13 host congregations </li></ul><ul><li>Secure a day center </li></ul><ul><li>Arrange for transportation </li></ul><ul><li>Prepare a first year budget </li></ul><ul><li>Raise required funds </li></ul><ul><li>Develop the Network’s governing body, the Board of Trustees </li></ul><ul><li>Form the Network into a nonprofit organization </li></ul><ul><li>Hire the Network Director </li></ul><ul><li>“ The IHN program empowers volunteers to be directly and personally involved in helping to solve the problem of homelessness and make a difference in someone’s life. The positive action of volunteering changes that frustration and helplessness into joy at seeing what caring can do.” </li></ul><ul><li>Carol Young, Volunteer, The Presbyterian Church of Chestnut Hill, PA </li></ul>
  20. 21. Core Group Committees <ul><li>Core group committees focus on specific components of the Network program. Each committee has a chairperson who reports to the entire core group. The core group committees are described here: </li></ul><ul><li>Host Congregation Recruitment Committee : Recruit 10 to13 host congregations from a prospect list (prepared by the core group) of about 30 area congregations. Present IHN to clergy, mission committees, and congregational boards. Make presentations synagogue services, adult forums and committee meetings. Provide information and follow-up throughout a prospective congregation’s decision-making process. 3 to 5 active members are needed for the Host Congregation Recruitment Committee. </li></ul><ul><li>The recruitment of host congregations is the most labor- and time-intensive part in the development of your Network. It is also the task that reaps the most rewards. Good recruiters build enthusiasm for the Network among all the congregations on the prospect list. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Day Center Committee: Finds an organization with the resources for a day center. Maybe someone in the core group knows the chairman of the “Y”. That kind of link can greatly simplify the search for a site. Churches (particularly large downtown facilities) and social service agencies are potential day center sites. 2 or 3 people are needed for the Day Center Committee. </li></ul><ul><li>Transportation Committee: Secures the most cost-effective transportation between the day center and host congregations. Explore possibilities for purchasing a van, obtaining a used van, or contracting for transportation services. 1 or 2 people usually take on the project of serving on the Transportation Committee. </li></ul><ul><li>Fundraising Committee: Estimates expenses, establishes a first year budget and develops and implements a fundraising plan. Experience in fundraising and grant writing are big assets on this committee – strong community connections, especially to corporations in the area, are helpful, too. 3 to 5 people form this committee </li></ul>
  21. 22. Summary of IHN Program Benefits <ul><li>For Guests </li></ul><ul><li>Safe, homelike shelter where families can stay together. </li></ul><ul><li>Guests cite the caring of volunteers as one of the most important benefits: &quot;I never knew so many people cared.&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>Intensive case management by Network Director to assist in finding housing and jobs and in meeting other needs </li></ul><ul><li>On average, more than 75% of guest families secure permanent housing. </li></ul><ul><li>  For Volunteers </li></ul><ul><li>Opportunity to help homeless families directly: to make a difference. </li></ul><ul><li>Opportunity to do outreach within their own house of worship or a nearby location. </li></ul><ul><li>Wide range of volunteer activities to fit varying schedules and levels of commitment. </li></ul><ul><li>Opportunity for families to volunteer together </li></ul><ul><li>Very few truly cannot do this… </li></ul>
  22. 23. Summary of IHN Program Benefits <ul><li>For Congregations </li></ul><ul><li>Opportunity for outreach (within the congregation’s own facilities) focusing on the needs of people in the community. </li></ul><ul><li>Opportunity for participation in a community interfaith project. </li></ul><ul><li>Increased sense of community among members as they work together in shared effort. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>For Community </li></ul><ul><li>Cost-efficient mobilization of community resources. </li></ul><ul><li>Does not duplicate services already in community; works with social service agencies to provide counseling, job training, help with housing search, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Does not institutionalize shelter as a solution to homelessness. </li></ul><ul><li>Becomes catalyst for other community initiatives, such as job counseling, parenting workshops, transitional housing, etc. </li></ul>
  23. 24. Typical Volunteer Schedule for the Host Facility <ul><li>5:30-8:30pm- Supper and Evening Volunteers </li></ul><ul><li>8:30pm- 6:00am- Overnight Volunteers </li></ul><ul><li>6:00- 7:00am- Breakfast Volunteers </li></ul><ul><li>This schedule shares the work and allows adults, teenagers, and even children, to find their niche as volunteers. </li></ul><ul><li>During the host week, a congregation might require 30 to 50 volunteers. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Virtually all who work with IHN are volunteers who take time out of their own personal lives to help people. They do their best to make us comfortable, warm and well fed. They day center allows us to get the kind of assistance doctor appointment and meet personal needs. I don’t know what my family and I would have done if it hadn’t been for IHN.” </li></ul><ul><li>Raleigh, Guest, Minneapolis, MN </li></ul>
  24. 25. Supplies Needed <ul><li>The Network provides much of the essential equipment: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Folding cots, blankets, mattress covers, pillows, van transport </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The Host congregation provides some items: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sheets, towels, wash clothes, food, dinnerware, lunch/sandwich bags, first aid kit, toys, books, games, soap, and diapers </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Friends or members of the congregation donate specialized equipment such as: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Cribs, playpens, high chairs, etc. </li></ul></ul>
  25. 26. Cost to the Host Congregation <ul><li>Cost of food staples, utilities and supplies averages $200 for the Host Week (but much of that will be donated, keeping even that cost down) </li></ul><ul><li>Local stores or institutions frequently contribute food items and supplies </li></ul><ul><li>“ The Network program teaches us that the solutions to community problems are in the minds and hearts of the American people, right within our own communities. When we become involved with our next door neighbor, problems become real to us and we’ll work together to find the solutions.” </li></ul><ul><li>Barbara Lashley, Volunteer Christ the Good Shepherd, </li></ul><ul><li>Houston, TX </li></ul><ul><li>The financial cost to each host congregation is minimal… </li></ul>
  26. 27. Frequently Asked Questions…
  27. 28. <ul><li>How many host congregations are needed to form a Network? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A Network needs 10 to 13 host congregations. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fewer than 10 could overtax some congregations, jeopardizing their participation. More than 13 would dilute the experience for congregations, resulting in a loss of continuity and focus. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>With less experienced volunteers, a network would be harder to operate, and recruitment of volunteers would be more difficult. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>There is such a diversity in the spiritual gifts of individuals. IHN gives occasion for people to use their abilities and skills. Driving a van, preparing a meal, listening to a parent, playing with a child, washing linens, and arranging living quarters are all ministries that bring the gospel of Christ to life. Relationships are formed and fellowship is shared...all to the glory of God and for the good of those who need a blessing. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Dr. Ken Altom, New Hope Baptist Church, Raleigh, NC </li></ul></ul>
  28. 29. <ul><li>We don’t have a day center in our community. How should we go about finding one? </li></ul><ul><li>Most operating day centers for homeless people are not appropriate for the Network program; they are drop-in centers that serve a mixed population, often including single men who live on the streets and are not suitable </li></ul><ul><li>for families. </li></ul><ul><li>You should be looking for space for a day center , rather than an operating day center. Most networks find space for a day center in churches, “Y”s, or social service agencies . </li></ul><ul><li>Some Networks use one large room or find a place with access </li></ul><ul><li>to several rooms. </li></ul><ul><li>Essential facilities are a lounge area for families, a play area for children, a small room or cubicle for the Network director (who will provide most of the supervision of the day center), and showers . If showers are not available, the Network needs to install them </li></ul>
  29. 30. <ul><li>How do we handle transportation ? </li></ul><ul><li>Networks usually purchase a van, or a van is loaned or donated to the Network. </li></ul><ul><li>Some Networks contract with a transportation company that takes care of the van, driver, insurance, and maintenance. </li></ul><ul><li>Networks that purchase a van usually get the money from foundations that fund capital expenditures </li></ul>
  30. 31. <ul><li>Can we use volunteer van drivers? </li></ul><ul><li>Family Promise does not recommend using volunteer drivers. </li></ul><ul><li>For safety and reliability, it’s best to use paid drivers with verified driving experience and safety records . </li></ul><ul><li>Scheduling problems, which can be time-consuming when volunteer drivers are used, can usually be avoided or minimized by using paid drivers </li></ul>IHN allows for the people of our suburban community to come into contact with and help the homeless in our own area. Some of our parishioners feel uncomfortable to drive into the inner‑city to help the homeless, but are ready to help when they come into our area. Fr. Bob Klemme, St. Elizabeth Seton Parish, Carmel, IN
  31. 32. <ul><li>What facilities do host congregations need to have for guests? </li></ul><ul><li>Facilities must include: </li></ul><ul><li>lounge area (with sofa, chairs, tables, TV), </li></ul><ul><li>a dining area , </li></ul><ul><li>a kitchen , </li></ul><ul><li>bathrooms , and </li></ul><ul><li>sleeping accommodations . </li></ul><ul><li>Ideally, congregations provide a separate room, such as a classroom, for each family. If that isn’t possible, a fellowship hall or other large room can be divided by partitions to provide privacy </li></ul>
  32. 33. <ul><li>Our building is in use almost all the time. How will we find the space? </li></ul><ul><li>Churches and synagogues are busy places with many demands on their space. Rarely does a perfect space exist. </li></ul><ul><li>Hosting almost always means making some scheduling adjustments for activities and meetings. </li></ul><ul><li>For example, four or five times a year, AA or the Bible Study Group may need to move their Tuesday night meeting to another room. </li></ul>
  33. 34. <ul><li>Can families’ belongings be moved in the morning and moved back in the evening to permit the congregation to use the space during the day? </li></ul><ul><li>No . The sleeping accommodations need to be dedicated to the families for the entire host week. </li></ul><ul><li>The beds and the guests’ belongings must not be moved in the morning and put back in the evening. </li></ul><ul><li>Besides being cumbersome, moving the beds and the guests’ belongings would be difficult for guests. When guests arrive on Sunday, they come with their belongings and perhaps a few of their children’s favorite toys. </li></ul><ul><li>They want to arrange their space as if it were their home. </li></ul>
  34. 35. <ul><li>How long do families stay in the Network? </li></ul><ul><li>The Guest Guidelines call for a maximum stay of 30 days. </li></ul><ul><li>However, Network directors often extend the stay as long as families are making good-faith efforts to find housing. In some communities, families can find housing within 30 days. In other communities—where there is a severe shortage of low-income housing, and waiting lists for public housing and Section 8 are closed—finding a home can take 60 days or more. </li></ul>
  35. 36. <ul><li>Where do guest families stay during the day on weekends? </li></ul><ul><li>In most Networks, families stay at the day center. </li></ul><ul><li>If the day center space is used for other purposes on weekends, a second day center site for weekends must be secured </li></ul>
  36. 37. <ul><li>How are families referred to the Network? </li></ul><ul><li>Two weeks before the Network opens, the Network director meets with potential referring agencies— shelters, public assistance offices, the Red Cross, and the Salvation Army. The director describes the program and provides printed material on how to make referrals. </li></ul><ul><li>When a homeless family seeks shelter through an agency, a social worker conducts a brief interview and may contact the Network director to find out if space is available. If the answer is yes, and if the family seems appropriate for the Network, the agency refers the family to the day center. At the day center, the Network director conducts an in-depth interview before accepting the family into the Network . </li></ul>
  37. 38. <ul><li>Isn’t it difficult for families to move week to week? </li></ul><ul><li>Moving every week isn’t ideal, but most families say that the homelike setting and the support of volunteers more than compensate for the moving. </li></ul><ul><li>While host congregations change every week or two, the day center remains the same, providing continuity and a home base for families as they look for housing and jobs. The day center also provides a permanent address that families can use in their housing and job searches. </li></ul>
  38. 39. <ul><li>Will the children miss school because their families are staying in different congregations every week or two? </li></ul><ul><li>No. The Network director works with the school system to ensure that all children attend school. The day center is the permanent address of the Network. </li></ul><ul><li>Children go to the school they have been attending or to the school nearest the day center . Arrangements are made locally with the school system. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1987, Congress passed the McKinney Act , legislation that requires all states and school districts to provide for the education of homeless youth. Each state has developed a plan to implement the Act. Most of the state plans are flexible and allow children to attend the school they last attended or the school closest to the shelter (day center). </li></ul>
  39. 40. <ul><li> What are the insurance implications of participating in the Network? Does the congregation have to amend its policy? </li></ul><ul><li>Each local Network must carry general liability insurance . Congregations are usually covered by their own property and liability policies because IHN is considered to be an outreach ministry, a regular activity of the church like a youth sleepover or Friday night supper. </li></ul><ul><li>Most congregations find they do not need extra insurance to be hosts. To be certain, each congregation must contact its insurance agent . </li></ul>
  40. 41. <ul><li>How much money is needed to start a Network? </li></ul><ul><li>First-year budgets can range from $90,000 to $125,000, depending on whether a van is purchased and whether rent must be paid for the day center. </li></ul><ul><li>Most Networks find that first-year operating budgets are about $90,000. </li></ul><ul><li>Family Promise recommends that Networks have at least one third of this amount on hand before opening. </li></ul><ul><li>“ The IHN program has allowed us to give names to so many more church community members. New people have volunteered to help our guests, and made us more united. Together, we witness Jesus' loving service.” </li></ul><ul><li>Fr. Cassian Lewinski, St. Catherine's Newman Center, Salt Lake City, UT </li></ul>
  41. 42. <ul><li>How do we raise the money? </li></ul><ul><li>Funds are raised locally from individuals, congregations, foundations, and corporations . </li></ul><ul><li>Religious judicatories (regional denominational offices, such as the Presbytery, Methodist Conference, and Episcopal Diocese) often provide seed money, as well as ongoing funds. </li></ul><ul><li>Local foundations within your county or state may also provide seed money. </li></ul>
  42. 43. <ul><li>How long does it take to develop a Network? </li></ul><ul><li>Some Networks have developed in 10 months, while others have taken a year and a half, or longer. </li></ul><ul><li>Usually a Network becomes operational about 12 to 18 months after the Community Meeting. </li></ul><ul><li>The most important and time-consuming part of forming a Network is recruiting the host congregations. Networks that plan for and emphasize recruitment get there faster. </li></ul>
  43. 44. <ul><li>Do we really need to hire a full-time Network director? Can’t a staff member from another agency manage the Network on a part-time basis? </li></ul><ul><li>You will need to hire a full-time Network director. </li></ul><ul><li>A unique strength of the Network program is the intensive case management that a full-time director provides to homeless families. In addition to case management, the director coordinates and trains volunteers and is responsible for the overall management of the program. </li></ul><ul><li>Without a dedicated professional in the Network, families would not receive the services that help make the program so successful. </li></ul>
  44. 45. <ul><li>What are some advantages of the Network program over a more traditional shelter? </li></ul><ul><li>An Interfaith Hospitality Network has these advantages: </li></ul><ul><li>A Network can be developed quickly. </li></ul><ul><li>A Network is cost-effective because it utilizes existing community resources. </li></ul><ul><li>A Network program doesn’t institutionalize shelter as a solution to homelessness. </li></ul><ul><li>In Networks, more than 75% percent of the guest families find permanent housing, often with volunteers’ help. </li></ul><ul><li>For congregations, the Network is a vital outreach ministry within the walls of the members’ own church or synagogue. </li></ul><ul><li>A Network is a catalyst for other community initiatives. Many active Networks go on to create new programs in areas such as parenting and mentoring, transitional housing, and housing renovation. </li></ul>
  45. 46. Contact Information <ul><li>If you would like more information on the Network program, please contact: </li></ul><ul><li>Family Promise </li></ul><ul><li>71 Summit Avenue, </li></ul><ul><li>Summit, NJ 07901 </li></ul><ul><li>Telephone: (908) 273-1100 </li></ul><ul><li>Fax: (908) 273-0030 </li></ul><ul><li>E-mail: info@familypromise.org </li></ul>

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