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Chapter 19:  Elements and Their Properties Unit 5: Diversity of Matter Table of Contents 19 19.3:  Mixed Groups 19.1:  Met...
Properties of Metals <ul><li>In the periodic table, metals are elements found to the left of the stair-step line.   </li><...
Properties of Metals <ul><li>Metals   usually have common properties  they are good conductors of heat and electricity, a...
Properties of Metals <ul><li>Metals also reflect light.  This is a property called luster.   </li></ul><ul><li>Metals are ...
Ionic Bonding in Metals <ul><li>The atoms of metals generally have one to three electrons in their outer energy levels.   ...
Ionic Bonding in Metals <ul><li>When metals combine with nonmetals, the atoms of the metals tend to lose electrons to the ...
Metallic Bonding <ul><li>In  metallic bonding ,  positively charged metallic ions are surrounded by a cloud of electrons. ...
Metallic Bonding <ul><li>The idea of metallic bonding explains many of the properties of metals.   </li></ul><ul><li>When ...
The Alkali Metals <ul><li>The elements in Group 1 of the periodic table are the alkali (AL kuh li) metals.   </li></ul><ul...
The Alkali Metals <ul><li>The alkali metals are the most reactive of all the metals.  They react rapidly  sometimes viole...
The Alkali Metals <ul><li>Each atom of an alkali metal has one electron in its outer energy level. </li></ul>19.1 Metals <...
The Alkali Metals <ul><li>Alkali metals and their compounds have many uses.   </li></ul>19.1 Metals <ul><li>Doctors use li...
The Alkali Metals <ul><li>The operation of some photocells depends upon rubidium or cesium compounds.   </li></ul>19.1 Met...
The Alkaline Earth Metals <ul><li>Each atom of an alkaline earth metal has two electrons in its outer energy level.   </li...
The Alkaline Earth Metals <ul><li>The alkaline earth metals make up Group 2 of the periodic table.   </li></ul>19.1 Metals...
Fireworks and Other Uses <ul><li>Magnesium metal is one of the metals used to produce the brilliant white color in firewor...
Fireworks and Other Uses <ul><li>Magnesium’s lightness and strength account for its use in cars, planes, and spacecraft.  ...
The Alkaline Earth Metals and Your Body  <ul><li>Calcium is seldom used as a free metal, but its compounds are needed for ...
The Alkaline Earth Metals and Your Body  <ul><li>The barium compound BaSO 4   is used to diagnose some digestive disorders...
Transition Elements <ul><li>Transition elements  are those elements in Groups 3 through 12 in the periodic table.  </li></...
Transition Elements <ul><li>Transition elements are familiar because they often occur in nature as uncombined elements.  <...
Iron, Cobalt, and Nickel <ul><li>The first elements in Groups 8, 9, and 10  iron, cobalt, and nickel  form a unique clus...
Iron, Cobalt, and Nickel <ul><li>Iron  the main component of steel  is the most widely used of all metals.  </li></ul>19...
Copper, Silver, and Gold <ul><li>Copper, silver, and gold  the three elements in Group 11  are so stable that they can b...
Copper, Silver, and Gold <ul><li>Copper often is used in electrical wiring because of its superior ability to conduct elec...
Zinc, Cadmium, and Mercury <ul><li>Zinc, cadmium, and mercury are found in Group 12 of the periodic table.  </li></ul>19.1...
Zinc, Cadmium, and Mercury <ul><li>Mercury is a silvery, liquid metal  the only metal that is a liquid at room temperatur...
The Inner Transition Metals <ul><li>The two rows of elements that seem to be disconnected from the rest on the periodic ta...
The Inner Transition Metals 19.1 Metals <ul><li>They are called this because like the transition elements, they fit in the...
The Lanthanides 19.1 Metals <ul><li>The first row includes a series of elements with atomic numbers of 58 to 71. </li></ul...
The Actinides  19.1 Metals <ul><li>The second row of inner transition metals includes elements with atomic numbers ranging...
Metals in the Crust 19.1 Metals <ul><li>Earth’s hardened outer layer, called the crust, contains many compounds and a few ...
Ores:  Minerals and Mixtures 19.1 Metals <ul><li>Metals in Earth’s crust that combined with other elements are found as or...
Ores:  Minerals and Mixtures 19.1 Metals <ul><li>After an ore is mined from Earth’s crust, the rock is separated from the ...
19.1 Section Check Question 1  What are common properties of metals? Answer  Metals are good conductors of heat and electr...
19.1 Section Check Question 2  Which of these best describes electrons in metallic bonding? A.  electron acceptor B.  elec...
19.1 Section Check Answer  The answer is B. In metallic bonding, positively charged metallic ions are surrounded by a clou...
19.1 Section Check Question 3  How do alkaline earth metals differ from alkali metals?
19.1 Section Check Answer  Alkali metals have one electron in the outer energy level of each atom. Each atom of alkaline e...
Properties of Nonmetals <ul><li>Most of your body’s mass is made of oxygen, carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen.  </li></ul><ul...
Properties of Nonmetals <ul><li>Phosphorus, sulfur, and chlorine are among these other elements found in your body.  </li>...
Properties of Nonmetals <ul><li>Most nonmetals do not conduct heat or electricity well, and generally they are not shiny. ...
Properties of Nonmetals <ul><li>The noble gases, Group 18, make up the only group of elements that are all nonmetals.  </l...
Bonding in Nonmetals <ul><li>The electrons in most nonmetals are strongly attracted to the nucleus of the atom.  So, as a ...
Bonding in Nonmetals <ul><li>When nonmetals gain electrons from metals, the nonmetals become negative ions in ionic compou...
Hydrogen <ul><li>If you could count all the atoms in the universe, you would find that about 90 percent of them are hydrog...
Hydrogen 19.2 Nonmetals   <ul><li>A  diatomic molecule  consists of two atoms of the same element in a covalent bond.  </l...
Hydrogen <ul><li>Hydrogen is highly reactive.  </li></ul>19.2 Nonmetals   <ul><li>A hydrogen atom has a single electron, w...
The Halogens <ul><li>Halogen lights contain small amounts of bromine or iodine.  </li></ul>19.2 Nonmetals   <ul><li>These ...
The Halogens 19.2 Nonmetals   <ul><li>They are very reactive in their elemental form, and their compounds have many uses. ...
The Halogens <ul><li>Because an atom of a halogen has seven electrons in its outer energy level, only one electron is need...
The Halogens <ul><li>In the gaseous state, the halogens form reactive diatomic covalent molecules and can be identified by...
The Halogens <ul><li>Fluorine is the most chemically active of all elements.  </li></ul>19.2 Nonmetals   <ul><li>Hydrofluo...
Uses of Halogens <ul><li>Chlorine compounds are used to disinfect water.  </li></ul>19.2 Nonmetals   <ul><li>Chlorine, the...
Uses of Halogens 19.2 Nonmetals   <ul><li>Household and industrial bleaches used to whiten flour, clothing, and paper also...
Uses of Halogens <ul><li>Bromine, the only nonmetal that is a liquid at room temperature, also is extracted from compounds...
Uses of Halogens <ul><li>Iodine, a shiny purple-gray solid at room temperature, is obtained from seawater.  </li></ul>19.2...
Uses of Halogens <ul><li>Astatine is the last member of Group 17.  It is radioactive and rare, but has many properties sim...
The Noble Gases <ul><li>The noble gases exist as isolated atoms.  </li></ul>19.2 Nonmetals   <ul><li>They are stable becau...
19.2 Section Check Question 1  Which elements exist primarily as gases or brittle solids at room temperature? A.  metals B...
19.2 Section Check Answer  The answer is C. Solid nonmetals are brittle or powdery and not malleable or ductile.
19.2 Section Check Question 2  A(n) __________ molecule consists of two atoms of the same element in a covalent bond. A.  ...
19.2 Section Check Answer  The answer is C. When water is broken down into its elements, hydrogen becomes a gas made up of...
19.2 Section Check Question 3 Which of the following accounts for 90 percent of the atoms in the universe? A.  carbon B.  ...
19.2 Section Check Answer  The answer is B. Hydrogen makes up 90 percent of the atoms in the universe. On Earth, most hydr...
The Noble Gases <ul><li>The stability of noble gases is what makes them useful. </li></ul>19.2 Nonmetals   <ul><li>The lig...
Properties of Metalloids <ul><li>Metalloids share unusual characteristics. </li></ul><ul><li>Metalloids  can form ionic an...
Properties of Metalloids <ul><li>Some metalloids can conduct electricity better than most nonmetals, but not as well as so...
The Boron Group <ul><li>Boron, a metalloid, is the first element in Group 13.  </li></ul><ul><li>If you look around your h...
The Boron Group 19.3 Mixed Groups <ul><li>One of these is borax, which is used in some laundry products to soften water.  ...
The Boron Group <ul><li>Aluminum, a metal in Group 13, is the most abundant metal in Earth’s crust.  </li></ul><ul><li>It ...
The Carbon Group <ul><li>Each element in Group 14, the carbon family, has four electrons in its outer energy level, but th...
The Carbon Group <ul><li>Carbon is a nonmetal, silicon and germanium are metalloids, and tin and lead are metals.  </li></...
The Carbon Group <ul><li>Carbon occurs as an element in coal and as a compound in oil, natural gas, and foods.  </li></ul>...
The Carbon Group <ul><li>Silicon is second only to oxygen in abundance in Earth’s crust.  </li></ul><ul><li>The crystal st...
The Carbon Group <ul><li>Silicon is the main component in  semiconductors  elements that conduct an electric current unde...
The Carbon Group <ul><li>Tin is used to coat other metals to prevent corrosion.  </li></ul><ul><li>Tin also is combined wi...
Allotropes of Carbon <ul><li>Diamond, graphite, and buckminsterfullerene are allotropes of an element.  </li></ul><ul><li>...
Allotropes of Carbon 19.3 Mixed Groups <ul><li>In turn, many tetrahedrons join together to form a giant molecule in which ...
Allotropes of Carbon <ul><li>In the mid-1980s, a new allotrope of carbon called buckminsterfullerene was discovered.  This...
Allotropes of Carbon <ul><li>In 1991, scientists were able to use the buckyballs to synthesize extremely thin, graphitelik...
The Nitrogen Group <ul><li>The nitrogen family makes up Group 15.  </li></ul>19.3 Mixed Groups <ul><li>Each element has fi...
The Nitrogen Group <ul><li>Nitrogen is the fourth most abundant element in your body.  </li></ul>19.3 Mixed Groups <ul><li...
Uses of the Nitrogen Group <ul><li>Phosphorus is a nonmetal that has three allotropes.  </li></ul>19.3 Mixed Groups <ul><l...
The Oxygen Group <ul><li>Group 16 on the periodic table is the oxygen group.  </li></ul>19.3 Mixed Groups <ul><li>Oxygen, ...
The Oxygen Group <ul><li>Group 16 on the periodic table is the oxygen group.  </li></ul>19.3 Mixed Groups <ul><li>Oxygen, ...
The Oxygen Group <ul><li>The second element in the oxygen group is sulfur.  </li></ul>19.3 Mixed Groups <ul><li>Sulfur is ...
The Oxygen Group <ul><li>The nonmetal selenium and two metalloids  tellurium and polonium  are the other Group 16 elemen...
Synthetic Elements <ul><li>By smashing existing elements with particles accelerated in a heavy ion accelerator, scientists...
Synthetic Elements <ul><li>Plutonium also can be changed to americium, element 95.  This element is used in home smoke det...
Transuranium Elements <ul><li>Elements having more than 92 protons, the atomic number of uranium, are called  transuranium...
Transuranium Elements 19.3 Mixed Groups <ul><li>All of the transuranium elements are synthetic and unstable, and many of t...
Why make elements? <ul><li>The most recently discovered elements are synthetic.  </li></ul>19.3 Mixed Groups <ul><li>By st...
Why make elements? <ul><li>When these atoms disintegrate, they are said to be radioactive. </li></ul>19.3 Mixed Groups <ul...
Seeking Stability <ul><li>In the 1960s, scientists theorized that stable synthetic elements exist.  </li></ul>19.3 Mixed G...
19.3 Section Check Question 1 Which of these compounds is not an allotrope of carbon? A.  buckminsterfullerene B.  diamond...
19.3 Section Check Answer  The answer is D. Quartz is a mineral composed of silicon dioxide.  Diamond Graphite Buckminster...
19.3 Section Check Question 2 If you want to use a circle graph to represent the amount of hydrogen in the universe relati...
19.3 Section Check Answer  The answer is D. 90 percent of the 360º in a circle is equal to 324º.
19.3 Section Check Question 3 Elements having more than 92 protons are called __________. Answer  The atomic number of ura...
To advance to the next item or next page click on any of the following keys: mouse, space bar, enter, down or forward arro...
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Transcript of "Bonding"

  1. 1. 19
  2. 2. Chapter 19: Elements and Their Properties Unit 5: Diversity of Matter Table of Contents 19 19.3: Mixed Groups 19.1: Metals 19.2: Nonmetals
  3. 3. Properties of Metals <ul><li>In the periodic table, metals are elements found to the left of the stair-step line. </li></ul>19.1 Metals
  4. 4. Properties of Metals <ul><li>Metals usually have common properties  they are good conductors of heat and electricity, and all but one are solid at room temperature. </li></ul>19.1 Metals
  5. 5. Properties of Metals <ul><li>Metals also reflect light. This is a property called luster. </li></ul><ul><li>Metals are malleable (MAL yuh bul), which means they can be hammered or rolled into sheets. </li></ul>19.1 Metals <ul><li>Metals are also ductile , which means they can be drawn into wires. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Ionic Bonding in Metals <ul><li>The atoms of metals generally have one to three electrons in their outer energy levels. </li></ul><ul><li>In chemical reactions, metals tend to give up electrons easily because of the strength of charge of the protons in the nucleus. </li></ul>19.1 Metals
  7. 7. Ionic Bonding in Metals <ul><li>When metals combine with nonmetals, the atoms of the metals tend to lose electrons to the atoms of nonmetals, forming ionic bonds. </li></ul><ul><li>Both metals and nonmetals become more chemically stable when they form ions. </li></ul>19.1 Metals
  8. 8. Metallic Bonding <ul><li>In metallic bonding , positively charged metallic ions are surrounded by a cloud of electrons. </li></ul><ul><li>Outer-level electrons are not held tightly to the nucleus of an atom. Rather, the electrons move freely among many positively charged ions. </li></ul>19.1 Metals
  9. 9. Metallic Bonding <ul><li>The idea of metallic bonding explains many of the properties of metals. </li></ul><ul><li>When a metal is hammered into a sheet or drawn into a wire, it does not break because the ions are in layers that slide past one another without losing their attraction to the electron cloud. </li></ul>19.1 Metals <ul><li>Metals are also good conductors of electricity because the outer-level electrons are weakly held. </li></ul>
  10. 10. The Alkali Metals <ul><li>The elements in Group 1 of the periodic table are the alkali (AL kuh li) metals. </li></ul><ul><li>Group 1 metals are shiny, malleable, and ductile. </li></ul>19.1 Metals <ul><li>They are also good conductors of heat and electricity. However, they are softer than most other metals. </li></ul>
  11. 11. The Alkali Metals <ul><li>The alkali metals are the most reactive of all the metals. They react rapidly  sometimes violently  with oxygen and water. </li></ul>19.1 Metals <ul><li>Alkali metals don’t occur in nature in their elemental form and are stored in substances that are unreactive, such as an oil. </li></ul>
  12. 12. The Alkali Metals <ul><li>Each atom of an alkali metal has one electron in its outer energy level. </li></ul>19.1 Metals <ul><li>This electron is given up when an alkali metal combines with another atom. </li></ul><ul><li>As a result, the alkali metal becomes a positively charged ion in a compound such as sodium chloride. </li></ul>
  13. 13. The Alkali Metals <ul><li>Alkali metals and their compounds have many uses. </li></ul>19.1 Metals <ul><li>Doctors use lithium compounds to treat bipolar depression. </li></ul>
  14. 14. The Alkali Metals <ul><li>The operation of some photocells depends upon rubidium or cesium compounds. </li></ul>19.1 Metals <ul><li>Francium, the last element in Group 1, is extremely rare and radioactive. </li></ul><ul><li>A radioactive element is one in which the nucleus breaks down and gives off particles and energy. </li></ul>
  15. 15. The Alkaline Earth Metals <ul><li>Each atom of an alkaline earth metal has two electrons in its outer energy level. </li></ul>19.1 Metals
  16. 16. The Alkaline Earth Metals <ul><li>The alkaline earth metals make up Group 2 of the periodic table. </li></ul>19.1 Metals <ul><li>These electrons are given up when an alkaline earth metal combines with a nonmetal. </li></ul><ul><li>As a result, the alkaline earth metal becomes a positively charged ion in a compound such as calcium fluoride, CaF 2 . </li></ul>
  17. 17. Fireworks and Other Uses <ul><li>Magnesium metal is one of the metals used to produce the brilliant white color in fireworks. </li></ul>19.1 Metals <ul><li>Compounds of strontium produce the bright red flashes. </li></ul>
  18. 18. Fireworks and Other Uses <ul><li>Magnesium’s lightness and strength account for its use in cars, planes, and spacecraft. </li></ul>19.1 Metals <ul><li>Magnesium also is used in compounds to make such things as household ladders, and baseball and softball bats. </li></ul>
  19. 19. The Alkaline Earth Metals and Your Body <ul><li>Calcium is seldom used as a free metal, but its compounds are needed for life. </li></ul>19.1 Metals <ul><li>Calcium phosphate in your bones helps make them strong. </li></ul>
  20. 20. The Alkaline Earth Metals and Your Body <ul><li>The barium compound BaSO 4 is used to diagnose some digestive disorders because it absorbs X-ray radiation well. </li></ul>19.1 Metals <ul><li>Radium, the last element in Group 2, is radioactive and is found associated with uranium. It was once used to treat cancers. </li></ul>
  21. 21. Transition Elements <ul><li>Transition elements are those elements in Groups 3 through 12 in the periodic table. </li></ul>19.1 Metals <ul><li>They are called transition elements because they are considered to be elements in transition between Groups 1 and 2 and Groups 13 through 18. </li></ul>
  22. 22. Transition Elements <ul><li>Transition elements are familiar because they often occur in nature as uncombined elements. </li></ul>19.1 Metals <ul><li>Transition elements often form colored compounds. </li></ul><ul><li>Gems show brightly colored compounds containing chromium. </li></ul>
  23. 23. Iron, Cobalt, and Nickel <ul><li>The first elements in Groups 8, 9, and 10  iron, cobalt, and nickel  form a unique cluster of transition elements. </li></ul>19.1 Metals <ul><li>These three sometimes are called the iron triad. </li></ul><ul><li>All three elements are used in the process to create steel and other metal mixtures. </li></ul>
  24. 24. Iron, Cobalt, and Nickel <ul><li>Iron  the main component of steel  is the most widely used of all metals. </li></ul>19.1 Metals <ul><li>Nickel is added to some metals to give them strength. </li></ul>Click image to play movie
  25. 25. Copper, Silver, and Gold <ul><li>Copper, silver, and gold  the three elements in Group 11  are so stable that they can be found as free elements in nature. </li></ul>19.1 Metals <ul><li>These metals were once used widely to make coins. </li></ul><ul><li>For this reason, they are known as the coinage metals. </li></ul>
  26. 26. Copper, Silver, and Gold <ul><li>Copper often is used in electrical wiring because of its superior ability to conduct electricity and its relatively low cost. </li></ul>19.1 Metals <ul><li>Silver iodide and silver bromide break down when exposed to light, producing an image on paper. </li></ul><ul><li>Consequently, these compounds are used to make photographic film and paper. </li></ul>
  27. 27. Zinc, Cadmium, and Mercury <ul><li>Zinc, cadmium, and mercury are found in Group 12 of the periodic table. </li></ul>19.1 Metals <ul><li>Zinc combines with oxygen in the air to form a thin, protective coating of zinc oxide on its surface. </li></ul><ul><li>Zinc and cadmium often are used to coat, or plate, other metals such as iron because of this protective quality. </li></ul>
  28. 28. Zinc, Cadmium, and Mercury <ul><li>Mercury is a silvery, liquid metal  the only metal that is a liquid at room temperature. </li></ul>19.1 Metals <ul><li>It is used in thermometers, thermostats, switches, and batteries. </li></ul><ul><li>Mercury is poisonous and can accumulate in the body. </li></ul>
  29. 29. The Inner Transition Metals <ul><li>The two rows of elements that seem to be disconnected from the rest on the periodic table are called the inner transition elements. </li></ul>19.1 Metals
  30. 30. The Inner Transition Metals 19.1 Metals <ul><li>They are called this because like the transition elements, they fit in the periodic table between Groups 3 and 4 in periods 6 and 7, as shown. </li></ul>
  31. 31. The Lanthanides 19.1 Metals <ul><li>The first row includes a series of elements with atomic numbers of 58 to 71. </li></ul><ul><li>These elements are called the lanthanide series because they follow the element lanthanum. </li></ul>
  32. 32. The Actinides 19.1 Metals <ul><li>The second row of inner transition metals includes elements with atomic numbers ranging from 90 to 103. </li></ul><ul><li>These elements are called the actinide series because they follow the element actinium. </li></ul><ul><li>All of the actinides are radioactive and unstable. </li></ul><ul><li>Thorium and uranium are the actinides found in the Earth’s crust in usable quantities. </li></ul>
  33. 33. Metals in the Crust 19.1 Metals <ul><li>Earth’s hardened outer layer, called the crust, contains many compounds and a few uncombined metals such as gold and copper. </li></ul><ul><li>Most of the world’s platinum is found in South Africa. </li></ul><ul><li>The United States imports most of its chromium from South Africa, the Philippines, and Turkey. </li></ul>
  34. 34. Ores: Minerals and Mixtures 19.1 Metals <ul><li>Metals in Earth’s crust that combined with other elements are found as ores. </li></ul><ul><li>Most ores consist of a metal compound, or mineral, within a mixture of clay or rock. </li></ul>
  35. 35. Ores: Minerals and Mixtures 19.1 Metals <ul><li>After an ore is mined from Earth’s crust, the rock is separated from the mineral. </li></ul><ul><li>Then the mineral often is converted to another physical form. </li></ul><ul><li>This step usually involves heat and is called roasting. </li></ul>
  36. 36. 19.1 Section Check Question 1 What are common properties of metals? Answer Metals are good conductors of heat and electricity, reflect light, are malleable and ductile, and, except for Mercury, are solid at room temperature.
  37. 37. 19.1 Section Check Question 2 Which of these best describes electrons in metallic bonding? A. electron acceptor B. electron cloud C. electron donor D. electrons in fixed orbits
  38. 38. 19.1 Section Check Answer The answer is B. In metallic bonding, positively charged metallic ions are surrounded by a cloud of electrons.
  39. 39. 19.1 Section Check Question 3 How do alkaline earth metals differ from alkali metals?
  40. 40. 19.1 Section Check Answer Alkali metals have one electron in the outer energy level of each atom. Each atom of alkaline earth metals has two electrons in its outer energy level.
  41. 41. Properties of Nonmetals <ul><li>Most of your body’s mass is made of oxygen, carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen. </li></ul><ul><li>Calcium, a metal, and other elements make up the remaining four percent of your body’s mass. </li></ul>19.2 Nonmetals
  42. 42. Properties of Nonmetals <ul><li>Phosphorus, sulfur, and chlorine are among these other elements found in your body. </li></ul><ul><li>These elements are classified as nonmetals. </li></ul>19.2 Nonmetals <ul><li>Nonmetals are elements that usually are gases or brittle solids at room temperature. </li></ul>
  43. 43. Properties of Nonmetals <ul><li>Most nonmetals do not conduct heat or electricity well, and generally they are not shiny. </li></ul>19.2 Nonmetals <ul><li>In the periodic table, all nonmetals except hydrogen are found at the right of the stair-step line. </li></ul>
  44. 44. Properties of Nonmetals <ul><li>The noble gases, Group 18, make up the only group of elements that are all nonmetals. </li></ul>19.2 Nonmetals <ul><li>Group 17 elements, except for astatine, are also nonmetals. </li></ul>
  45. 45. Bonding in Nonmetals <ul><li>The electrons in most nonmetals are strongly attracted to the nucleus of the atom. So, as a group, nonmetals are poor conductors of heat and electricity. </li></ul>19.2 Nonmetals <ul><li>Most nonmetals can form ionic and covalent compounds. </li></ul>
  46. 46. Bonding in Nonmetals <ul><li>When nonmetals gain electrons from metals, the nonmetals become negative ions in ionic compounds. </li></ul>19.2 Nonmetals <ul><li>When bonded with other nonmetals, atoms of nonmetals usually share electrons to form covalent compounds. </li></ul>
  47. 47. Hydrogen <ul><li>If you could count all the atoms in the universe, you would find that about 90 percent of them are hydrogen. </li></ul>19.2 Nonmetals <ul><li>When water is broken down into its elements, hydrogen becomes a gas made up of diatomic molecules. </li></ul>
  48. 48. Hydrogen 19.2 Nonmetals <ul><li>A diatomic molecule consists of two atoms of the same element in a covalent bond. </li></ul>
  49. 49. Hydrogen <ul><li>Hydrogen is highly reactive. </li></ul>19.2 Nonmetals <ul><li>A hydrogen atom has a single electron, which the atom shares when it combines with other nonmetals. </li></ul><ul><li>Hydrogen can gain an electron when it combines with alkali and alkaline earth metals. </li></ul><ul><li>The compounds formed are hydrides. </li></ul>
  50. 50. The Halogens <ul><li>Halogen lights contain small amounts of bromine or iodine. </li></ul>19.2 Nonmetals <ul><li>These elements, as well as fluorine, chlorine, and astatine, are called halogens and are in Group 17. </li></ul>
  51. 51. The Halogens 19.2 Nonmetals <ul><li>They are very reactive in their elemental form, and their compounds have many uses. </li></ul>
  52. 52. The Halogens <ul><li>Because an atom of a halogen has seven electrons in its outer energy level, only one electron is needed to complete this energy level. </li></ul>19.2 Nonmetals <ul><li>If a halogen gains an electron from a metal, an ionic compound, called a salt is formed. </li></ul>
  53. 53. The Halogens <ul><li>In the gaseous state, the halogens form reactive diatomic covalent molecules and can be identified by their distinctive colors. </li></ul>19.2 Nonmetals <ul><li>Chlorine is greenish yellow, bromine is reddish orange, and iodine is violet. </li></ul>Click image to play movie
  54. 54. The Halogens <ul><li>Fluorine is the most chemically active of all elements. </li></ul>19.2 Nonmetals <ul><li>Hydrofluoric acid, a mixture of hydrogen fluoride and water, is used to etch glass and to frost the inner surfaces of lightbulbs and is also used in the fabrication of semiconductors. </li></ul>
  55. 55. Uses of Halogens <ul><li>Chlorine compounds are used to disinfect water. </li></ul>19.2 Nonmetals <ul><li>Chlorine, the most abundant halogen, is obtained from seawater at ocean-salt recovery sites. </li></ul>
  56. 56. Uses of Halogens 19.2 Nonmetals <ul><li>Household and industrial bleaches used to whiten flour, clothing, and paper also contain chlorine compounds. </li></ul>
  57. 57. Uses of Halogens <ul><li>Bromine, the only nonmetal that is a liquid at room temperature, also is extracted from compounds in seawater. </li></ul>19.2 Nonmetals <ul><li>Bromine compounds are used as dyes in cosmetics. </li></ul>
  58. 58. Uses of Halogens <ul><li>Iodine, a shiny purple-gray solid at room temperature, is obtained from seawater. </li></ul>19.2 Nonmetals <ul><li>When heated, iodine changes directly to a purple vapor. </li></ul><ul><li>The process of a solid changing directly to a vapor without forming a liquid is called sublimation . </li></ul>
  59. 59. Uses of Halogens <ul><li>Astatine is the last member of Group 17. It is radioactive and rare, but has many properties similar to those of the other halogens. </li></ul>19.2 Nonmetals <ul><li>There are no known uses due to its rarity. </li></ul>
  60. 60. The Noble Gases <ul><li>The noble gases exist as isolated atoms. </li></ul>19.2 Nonmetals <ul><li>They are stable because their outermost energy levels are full. </li></ul><ul><li>No naturally occurring noble gas compounds are known. </li></ul>
  61. 61. 19.2 Section Check Question 1 Which elements exist primarily as gases or brittle solids at room temperature? A. metals B. metalloids C. nonmetals D. synthetics
  62. 62. 19.2 Section Check Answer The answer is C. Solid nonmetals are brittle or powdery and not malleable or ductile.
  63. 63. 19.2 Section Check Question 2 A(n) __________ molecule consists of two atoms of the same element in a covalent bond. A. actinide B. allotropic C. diatomic D. lanthanide
  64. 64. 19.2 Section Check Answer The answer is C. When water is broken down into its elements, hydrogen becomes a gas made up of diatomic molecules.
  65. 65. 19.2 Section Check Question 3 Which of the following accounts for 90 percent of the atoms in the universe? A. carbon B. hydrogen C. nitrogen D. oxygen
  66. 66. 19.2 Section Check Answer The answer is B. Hydrogen makes up 90 percent of the atoms in the universe. On Earth, most hydrogen is found in the compound water.
  67. 67. The Noble Gases <ul><li>The stability of noble gases is what makes them useful. </li></ul>19.2 Nonmetals <ul><li>The light weight of helium makes it useful in lighter-than-air blimps and balloons. </li></ul><ul><li>Neon and argon are used in “neon lights” for advertising. </li></ul>
  68. 68. Properties of Metalloids <ul><li>Metalloids share unusual characteristics. </li></ul><ul><li>Metalloids can form ionic and covalent bonds with other elements and can have metallic and nonmetallic properties. </li></ul>19.3 Mixed Groups
  69. 69. Properties of Metalloids <ul><li>Some metalloids can conduct electricity better than most nonmetals, but not as well as some metals, giving them the name semiconductor. </li></ul><ul><li>With the exception of aluminum, the metalloids are the elements in the periodic table that are located along the stair-step line. </li></ul>19.3 Mixed Groups
  70. 70. The Boron Group <ul><li>Boron, a metalloid, is the first element in Group 13. </li></ul><ul><li>If you look around your home, you might find two compounds of boron. </li></ul>19.3 Mixed Groups
  71. 71. The Boron Group 19.3 Mixed Groups <ul><li>One of these is borax, which is used in some laundry products to soften water. </li></ul><ul><li>The other is boric acid, a mild antiseptic. </li></ul>
  72. 72. The Boron Group <ul><li>Aluminum, a metal in Group 13, is the most abundant metal in Earth’s crust. </li></ul><ul><li>It is used in soft-drink cans, foil wrap, cooking pans, and as siding. </li></ul>19.3 Mixed Groups <ul><li>Aluminum is strong and light and is used in the construction of airplanes. </li></ul>
  73. 73. The Carbon Group <ul><li>Each element in Group 14, the carbon family, has four electrons in its outer energy level, but this is where much of the similarity ends. </li></ul>19.3 Mixed Groups
  74. 74. The Carbon Group <ul><li>Carbon is a nonmetal, silicon and germanium are metalloids, and tin and lead are metals. </li></ul>19.3 Mixed Groups
  75. 75. The Carbon Group <ul><li>Carbon occurs as an element in coal and as a compound in oil, natural gas, and foods. </li></ul><ul><li>Carbon compounds, many of which are essential to life, can be found in you and all around you. </li></ul>19.3 Mixed Groups
  76. 76. The Carbon Group <ul><li>Silicon is second only to oxygen in abundance in Earth’s crust. </li></ul><ul><li>The crystal structure of silicon dioxide is similar to the structure of diamond. </li></ul>19.3 Mixed Groups <ul><li>Silicon occurs as two allotropes. Allotropes , which are different forms of the same element, have different molecular structures. </li></ul>
  77. 77. The Carbon Group <ul><li>Silicon is the main component in semiconductors  elements that conduct an electric current under certain conditions. </li></ul><ul><li>Germanium, the other metalloid in the carbon group, is used along with silicon in making semiconductors. </li></ul>19.3 Mixed Groups
  78. 78. The Carbon Group <ul><li>Tin is used to coat other metals to prevent corrosion. </li></ul><ul><li>Tin also is combined with other metals to produce bronze and pewter. </li></ul>19.3 Mixed Groups <ul><li>Lead was used widely in paint at one time, but because it is toxic, lead no longer is used. </li></ul>
  79. 79. Allotropes of Carbon <ul><li>Diamond, graphite, and buckminsterfullerene are allotropes of an element. </li></ul><ul><li>In a diamond, each carbon atom is bonded to four other carbon atoms at the vertices, or corner points, of a tetrahedron. </li></ul>19.3 Mixed Groups
  80. 80. Allotropes of Carbon 19.3 Mixed Groups <ul><li>In turn, many tetrahedrons join together to form a giant molecule in which the atoms are held tightly in a strong crystalline structure. </li></ul>
  81. 81. Allotropes of Carbon <ul><li>In the mid-1980s, a new allotrope of carbon called buckminsterfullerene was discovered. This soccer-ball-shaped molecule, informally called a buckyball, was named after the architect-engineer R. Buckminster Fuller, who designed structures with similar shapes. </li></ul>19.3 Mixed Groups
  82. 82. Allotropes of Carbon <ul><li>In 1991, scientists were able to use the buckyballs to synthesize extremely thin, graphitelike tubes. </li></ul>19.3 Mixed Groups <ul><li>These tubes, called nanotubes, are about 1 billionth of a meter in diameter. </li></ul><ul><li>Nanotubes might be used someday to make computers that are smaller and faster and to make strong building materials. </li></ul>
  83. 83. The Nitrogen Group <ul><li>The nitrogen family makes up Group 15. </li></ul>19.3 Mixed Groups <ul><li>Each element has five electrons in its outer energy level. </li></ul><ul><li>These elements tend to share electrons and to form covalent compounds with other elements. </li></ul>
  84. 84. The Nitrogen Group <ul><li>Nitrogen is the fourth most abundant element in your body. </li></ul>19.3 Mixed Groups <ul><li>Each breath you take is about 80 percent gaseous nitrogen in the form of diatomic molecules, N 2 . </li></ul>
  85. 85. Uses of the Nitrogen Group <ul><li>Phosphorus is a nonmetal that has three allotropes. </li></ul>19.3 Mixed Groups <ul><li>Antimony is a metalloid, and bismuth is a metal. </li></ul><ul><li>Both elements are used with other metals to lower their melting points. </li></ul>
  86. 86. The Oxygen Group <ul><li>Group 16 on the periodic table is the oxygen group. </li></ul>19.3 Mixed Groups <ul><li>Oxygen, a nonmetal, exists in the air as diatomic molecules, O 2 . </li></ul>
  87. 87. The Oxygen Group <ul><li>Group 16 on the periodic table is the oxygen group. </li></ul>19.3 Mixed Groups <ul><li>Oxygen, a nonmetal, exists in the air as diatomic molecules, O 2 . </li></ul><ul><li>During electrical storms, some oxygen molecules, O 2 , change into ozone molecules, O 3 . </li></ul>
  88. 88. The Oxygen Group <ul><li>The second element in the oxygen group is sulfur. </li></ul>19.3 Mixed Groups <ul><li>Sulfur is a nonmetal that exists in several allotropic forms. </li></ul><ul><li>It exists as different-shaped crystals and as a noncrystalline solid. </li></ul>
  89. 89. The Oxygen Group <ul><li>The nonmetal selenium and two metalloids  tellurium and polonium  are the other Group 16 elements. </li></ul>19.3 Mixed Groups <ul><li>Selenium is the most common of these three. </li></ul><ul><li>This element is one of several that you need in trace amounts in your diet. </li></ul><ul><li>But selenium is toxic if too much of it gets into your system. </li></ul>
  90. 90. Synthetic Elements <ul><li>By smashing existing elements with particles accelerated in a heavy ion accelerator, scientists have been successful in creating elements not typically found on Earth. </li></ul>19.3 Mixed Groups <ul><li>Except for technetium-43 and promethium-61, each synthetic element has more than 92 protons. </li></ul>
  91. 91. Synthetic Elements <ul><li>Plutonium also can be changed to americium, element 95. This element is used in home smoke detectors. </li></ul>19.3 Mixed Groups
  92. 92. Transuranium Elements <ul><li>Elements having more than 92 protons, the atomic number of uranium, are called transuranium elements . </li></ul>19.3 Mixed Groups <ul><li>These elements do not belong exclusively to the metal, nonmetal, or metalloid group. </li></ul>
  93. 93. Transuranium Elements 19.3 Mixed Groups <ul><li>All of the transuranium elements are synthetic and unstable, and many of them disintegrate quickly. </li></ul>
  94. 94. Why make elements? <ul><li>The most recently discovered elements are synthetic. </li></ul>19.3 Mixed Groups <ul><li>By studying how the synthesized elements form and disintegrate, you can gain an understanding of the forces holding the nucleus together. </li></ul>
  95. 95. Why make elements? <ul><li>When these atoms disintegrate, they are said to be radioactive. </li></ul>19.3 Mixed Groups <ul><li>Radioactive elements can be useful. For example, technetium’s radioactivity makes it ideal for many medical applications. </li></ul>
  96. 96. Seeking Stability <ul><li>In the 1960s, scientists theorized that stable synthetic elements exist. </li></ul>19.3 Mixed Groups <ul><li>Finding one might help scientists understand how the forces inside the atom work. </li></ul>
  97. 97. 19.3 Section Check Question 1 Which of these compounds is not an allotrope of carbon? A. buckminsterfullerene B. diamond C. graphite D. quartz
  98. 98. 19.3 Section Check Answer The answer is D. Quartz is a mineral composed of silicon dioxide. Diamond Graphite Buckminsterfullerener
  99. 99. 19.3 Section Check Question 2 If you want to use a circle graph to represent the amount of hydrogen in the universe relative to other elements, how many degrees will be used to represent hydrogen? A. 36º B. 90º C. 186º D. 324º
  100. 100. 19.3 Section Check Answer The answer is D. 90 percent of the 360º in a circle is equal to 324º.
  101. 101. 19.3 Section Check Question 3 Elements having more than 92 protons are called __________. Answer The atomic number of uranium is 92. Elements having more than 92 protons are called transuranium elements, and are synthetic and unstable.
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  103. 103. End of Chapter Summary File
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