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  • The first part was why the new standards, now we move into the specifics. First the standards, next the MC, and finally assessment.
  • The next five or six slides gives you a birds eye view of the standards. This is the basic structureCommon Core State Standards are organized by: Strands -There are four disciplines within English Language Arts and Literacy. Do we know how many strands we have in ELA? Four: Reading, WR, S & L, and Lang. Topics -This is the major focus for particular grade level or grade bandStandard Statements - are essential knowledge and skills to be learned at each grade level or grade bandReminder: This is the ELA common core format. Math’s format is different.
  • This is a graphic to show you how it all looks. A big picture—not precise in the number of statements. How many standard statements in all? Forty-six. You can see the strands at the top, the topics in the middle and the standard statement at the bottom. Notice that the reading strand is the only strand with a sub-strand layer. (Click for arrow fly-in.)
  • At its most basic organizational view, you can see the four main strands: reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language.
  • The next layer of organization is the topic layer.
  • This view shows each of the four strands with their corresponding topics.
  • TheReading strand has the most standards because it has a unique layer that we call sub-strands: literary,informational, and foundational skills (K-5 only).The topics for the sub-strands Reading Literature and Reading Informational Text are the same. They are: Key Ideas and Details, Craft and Structure, Integration of Knowledge and Ideas and Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity. The topics for Reading Foundational Skills are: Print Concepts, Phonological Awareness, Phonics and Word Recognition, and FluencyThere are ten standard statements for Literature as well as for Informational Text, and there are four standard statements for Foundational skillsTotal of twenty-four Reading Standard Statements. The standards are consistent throughout each sub-strand
  • Writing also has four topics with a total of ten standard statements. Topics: Text Types and Purposes, Production and Distribution of Writing, Research and Presentation of Knowledge, and Range of Writing
  • S & L has two topics, Comprehension and Collaboration and Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas with a total of six standard statements.
  • Language has three topics, Conventions of Standard English, Knowledge of Language, and Vocabulary Acquisition and Use, with a total of six standard statements.
  • Again, this is the overview of how the strands, topics, and standard statements are organized. Note: the number of topics and standard statements in this view are not accurate in terms of numbers.
  • Here’s a look at one page from the new standards. It is broken up into three parts: the Strands, the topics, and finally the Standard Statement.Refer to the standards you downloaded for a closer view.
  • The CCSS has a specific coding system for each strands. Knowing this coding will be helpful when you are aligning your lesson plans to the new standards.
  • This is an example of what you may see. This helps you understand specifically which strand, topic, and statement you may need to access.
  • Note that there are sub standard statements for Language (3a). This is also the case for Writing as well
  • RCFs:Allow ten minutes to complete. Don’t forget to go over the answers.
  • Every strand has a set of anchor standards. This was the first thing the writers of the CCSS created. Ten key skills every child should know which then branched off to specific statements for each grade/grade band. They are called the College and Career Ready Standards. Here’s an example of an anchor standards: CCR (College-Career Ready). R (Reading). 6 (Standard Six)This standard is expressed differently at each grade level.
  • The number of anchor standards directly correspond to the number of standards for each strand. Use the hyperlink only if there is time and/or Internet capabilities.
  • Each standard is aligned to its Anchor standard counterpart. The standards increase in complexity from one grade level to the next. Take Writing Standard 8 for example. Note at the end of grade 3 students recall, take brief notes and sort evidence into categories. At the end of grade 6 the student is required to use relevant information, assessing credibility, avoiding plagiarism and create a basic bibliography. At the end of grade 9 students collect information from authoritative sources, use search strategies effectively, assess the sources, maintain a flow of ideas and use a standard format for citation. The Anchor standard reflects a student that is college and career ready and serves as a summary of the skills necessary for this writing standard. Be sure to suggest that they take a look at the vertical alignment documents on the ELA website.
  • Allow fifteen minutes for this activity. Be sure to highlight a few of the participants’ answers/ask for feedback from the activity. What are we currently doing in our schools to support this articulation? What can we begin to do to prepare our students for the CCR standards?
  • An additional component of the CCSS are the Literacy Standards.Note: Technical Subjects definition. If someone asks you who is responsible for teaching the standards: All teachers. Designed to be addressed by all teachers. In the next video you will see a clip of David Coleman explaining the reasoning behind the Literacy Standards.
  • We know that sometimes by grades 4-5 there are content splits, but K-5 teachers are masters at integrating literacy across the content areas.
  • This is where they are located in the ELA document.
  • The heavy lifting must be shared by all.
  • Other components that are critical to understanding the new standards are the appendices. In addition to the anchor standards and the Literacy Standards, there are three appendices that can further assist teachers.Appendix A makes for a great professional development opportunity for ELA teachers to read and discuss.The link is on the ODE website as well as at corestandards.org I created a hyperlink to the documents—useonly if you want to look at each individual Appendix
  • Appendix B—It is not a reading list! These are just examples of text that are appropriate for each grade level. The students will not be held responsible for the content from these texts. They are tested by skill—not content.
  • Appendix C- Examples of student writing that show what high-quality student writing LOOKS like at each grade level.
  • Click for each fly in.
  • Standard statements are at the core of each piece of model curriculum.Progressions reflect the gradual development of skills over time. The intent is for teachers to be able to look at these progressions and know what was expected of students in earlier grades and to provide information about what they will be doing as they progress through grade levels.3.Content Elaborations provide clarifying information or illustrations to support teacher knowledge of the specific skills and strategies of those particular standards. Answers: what is this topic addressing?4.Enduring understandings address the question, Why do I have to know this? How does this apply to my life? The relevance of it.
  • 1.The instructional strategies and resources section is designed to be fluid. Itwas developed with the assistance of stakeholders across the state of Ohio. Educational personnel from classrooms, buildings, districts, administration, and higher education gathered and selected strategies and resources for further review by ODE. Information from stakeholders such as yourselves will go through a vetting process and be added as the site continues to be updated. The strategies and resources are not designed to provide teachers with lesson plans. They are to be used as ideas that are adapted for the specific population with whom you work. The professional resources are those works that provide additional clarification and supply ideas for classroom instruction that is related to those standards. As you look across the model curriculum you may notice some repetition of resources or strategies. This repetition occurs because some strategies and resources are appropriate for multiple grade levels or grade bands. 2. The Diverse Learners section offer two links: This site take you to strategies for gifted, ELL and students with disabilities. The www.cast.org link takes you to a website that exhibits the Universal Design for Learning framework (UDL.) It offers a plethora of resources and strategies for all diverse learners.
  • Allow 25 minutes for this section.
  • Create groups of 4-5 participants organized for grades K-4, 5-8 and high school.Explain to the participants that they will be using the 4-Square handout to analyze the content statement, content elaborations and expectations for learning. Tell them, We will go through the squares one at a time to explain them and provide you with guided practice. Then, you will use the blank analysis sheet for practice in small groups. We’ll use a sample from grade 4. Distribute the model curriculum for contentstatement 4 for grade 4. Be sure to tell them that they will need to return these to you to use for other workshops.
  • Here is what a completed analysis for this content statement might look like.
  • The objective in this session is to dig into the key ELA shifts that can assist you as you begin to prepare to revise your curriculum.
  • Review1. The Reading Strand has 3 substrands: Reading Literature, Reading Informational Text, Reading Foundational Skills (K-5 only)2. Reading Literature and Reading Informational Text are divided into four topics: Key Ideas and Details, Craft and Structure, Integration of Knowledge and Ideas, and Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity. Each strand has 10 standards aligned to the College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards.3. Reading Foundational Skills is divided into four topics as well: Print Concepts, Phonological Awareness, Phonics and Word Recognition, and Fluency. Each topic has one standard.
  • Detective: searches for clues, evidence that when pieced together solve a problem or mystery. Looks at every detail. Ponders, analyses, synthesizes, reaches a conclusion or hypothesis. Uses evidence to prove its validity.Close reader: Mystery or problem to be solved=what is the author trying to communicate in this text? Examines very word/detail and finds evidence to support his/her analysis of the text. Ponders, analyses, synthesizes, reaches a conclusion about what the author is intending.
  • Close reading allows for the exploration of central ideas and key supporting details, meanings of individual words and sentences and the development of ideas over the course of the text.Closer reading enables the student to make connections among ideas and between texts, consider a wider range of textual evidence, and show they are sensitive to inconsistencies, ambiguities, and poor reasoning in texts. (PARCC)
  • Too often we, in our zeal to prepare them for the reading, give away what the reader needs to discover. Why should they read it when you have already told them what it is about? Never give them information that they can find for themselves in the text. Text that deserves it: this process should be used when reading complex text that has levels of meaning. E.g. The Gettysburg Address.By asking good text-dependent questions, help them discover the answers. The text should reveal the answers rather than the teacher.
  • (Self-explanatory)Read deliberately and with expression.Have students respond to text-dependent questions individually (quick writes, journal entries) and then discuss.Authors select words carefully; consider why s/he chose certain words. When an author spends a lot of time working over a word (repetition), there is a reason. Analyze the author’s reason for doing this. Discuss.
  • In this video David Coleman demonstrates how to teach complex text. Path to locating this resources on the ODE Webpage: (Academic Content Standards>English Language Arts> ELA Common Core State Standards and Model Curriculum Development
  • One of the key requirements of the Common Core State Standards for Reading is that all students must be able to comprehend texts of steadily increasing complexity as they progress through school. Research indicates that the majority of students are presented with levels of text complexity below their grade level. They are not being S-T-R-E-T-C-H-E-D.
  • This information is taken from Appendix A of the Common Core State Standards. The Appendix goes on to state, “The difficulty of college textbooks, has not decreased in any block of time…it has, in fact, increased over that period. [In addition,] The word difficulty of every scientific journal and magazine…had actually increased, which is important in part because, as a 2005 College Board study found, college professors assign more readings from periodicals than do high school teachers. [Also important to note,] Workplace readings…exceeds grade 12 complexity significantly” --So it is evident that there is a great need to continue to develop students who will become independent and proficient readers. We as educators understand this notion, but now there are numbers, studies, and now clear standards that support our work.
  • The Common Core State Standards define a three-part model for determining how easy or difficult a particular text is to read. These are to be used together with grade-specific standards that require increasing sophistication in students’ reading comprehension ability. As signaled in the graphic here, the Standards’ model of text complexity consists of three equally important dimensions: qualitative, quantitative, and reader and task.
  • Those dimensions of text complexity that are difficult if not impossible for a human reader to evaluate efficiently, especially in long texts, and are thus today typically measured by computer software.
  • Those dimensions best measured or only measurable by an attentive human reader such as…..click through each dimension.See pages 5 - 7 of Appendix A for more details the describe these dimensions.
  • An example of a qualitative rubric created by Kansas Dept. of Education. See the handout for a better view.
  • Variables specific to particular readers and to particular tasks which are best made by teachers employing their professional judgment, experience, and knowledge of their students and the subject. See handout for specifics
  • Students deserve exposure to and opportunities to interact with complex unexpected texts. But how do we scaffold them into reading grade level complex texts? Some examples include….
  • Standard 10 of Informational Text for grades 6 – 12 address literary nonfiction only
  • Allow attendees to read and reflect. Perhaps discuss with each other for a minute.
  • Review the slideAsk for quick suggestions of literary nonfiction from the group. If answers are slow in coming provide some suggestions of your own. Here are a few….The Gettysburg AddressThe Declaration of IndependenceI Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya AngelouLet Us Now Praise Famous Men by James AgeeNotes of a Native Son by James BaldwinNickled and Dimed by Barbara EhrenreichThe City in History by Lewis MumfordThe Warmth of Other Sons – Isabell Wilkerson
  • To review, the writing strand has four topics:Text Types and Purposes with 3 standardsProduction and Distribution of Writing with 3 standardsResearch and Presentation of Knowledge with 3 standardsRange of Writing with 1 standardTotal of 10 writing standardsThe writing shifts in this section occur in text types and purposes and research and presentation of knowledge
  • What types of shifts are required for teachers to implement the writing standards?Writing to sources: when teachers assign writing, it should, more often than not, be based on something students have read. We don’t want to lose creative types of writing assignments, we just want to make sure students can really synthesize and analyze what they have read. Too often we ask them to write to open-ended prompts for which they have no background knowledge. Marshaling arguments: Students must be able to support their claims with evidence. A common mistake students make is to believe that because someone said it or because they claim it, it is true. All arguments/assertions must be measured by the accuracy of the evidence that support them. Research: teachers should not wait for senior year courses to begin research. Research starts as early as Kindergarten. Increase the number of short research opportunities. Take a look at the writing strands on research to look at how this looks in a classroom (Writing Standard 8)
  • The key to this standard is that the students have nothing to write about without referring to the text. The writing prompts must require that students rely on the text for answers. --“Rigorous, text-dependent questions require students to demonstrate that they can follow the details of what is explicitly stated and make valid claims and inferences that square with the evidence in the text” (PARCC ELA Framework 8).
  • Which option is a text-dependent prompt? First one. Must read the text to answer.Make sure to emphasize that both questions have value but that we have neglected the first type in the past.
  • Which option is a text-dependent prompt? First one. Must read the text to answer.Make sure to emphasize that both questions have value but that we have neglected the first type in the past.
  • Which option is a text-dependent prompt? First one. Must read the text to answer.Make sure to emphasize that both questions have value but that we have neglected the first type in the past.
  • Proposed by researchers Steve Graham and Michael Herbert and referenced in the PARCC framework.
  • The second shift focuses on how well students can marshal an argument—located in writing standard #1. Students must be able to rely on the evidence presented in the text to form their arguments.
  • We often confuse persuasion and argument.
  • Argumentative Writing: “While all three text types (argument, informative, and narrative) are important, the Standards put particular emphasis on students’ ability to write sound arguments on substantive topics and issues, as this ability is critical to college and career readiness” (CCSS ELA Appendix A). However, when marshaling arguments, students must rely on the creativity gleaned from the skills used in narrative writing to shape their reasoning. It’s about how well a student can comb the text to find evidence, then arrange the evidence in a way to support their ideas. The ideas are then presented clearly in writing as well as orally.
  • --Research is an integrated approach to instruction. Students should be able to focus their research around text and clearly articulate it in their writing and presentation. Consider using the in-class text to create a research project in order to make a more meaningful connection within the students’ reading and writing.
  • Most of the instructional shifts that are being called for in the CCSS can be addressed by research projects. Look for opportunities to make these connections.
  • --The emphasis is on the idea that teachers are using research as a means to extend the learning outside of the classroom. Students should be given the opportunity to investigate ideas as often as possible. This does not require a culminating research paper or project, but can be woven into several units of instruction. --Students must also access various forms of technology to support their research. Requiring a PowerPoint presentation is not enough. Consider utilizing face-to-face interviews via Skype or Google Talk, blogging as a way to collaborate with other students in the class, building, country, or even internationally, embedding YouTube or Vevo clips into presentations, social media (Twitter/Facebook/Google Plus) as a means of creating surveys
  • Break the participants up into groups to trace the progressions 6 (K-2),7(3-5), 8(6-8), and 9(9-12)—preferably by grade bands. Because of time, it may be best to allow them to reflect on the first two questions and bring the others back to their districts for further review. This time is just a springboard into the discussion they will need to have with their curriculum teams. Allow 15 minutes.
  • See the notes handout
  • A takeaway activity to use when beginning to implement the shift towards more research.
  • Language has three topics, Conventions of Standard English, Knowledge of Language, and Vocabulary Acquisition and Use, with a total of six standard statements.
  • *All three tiers of words are vital to comprehension and vocabulary development. Learning tier 2 and 3 words requires more deliberate effort.
  • *Tier 1 words are the words of everyday speech, they are usually learned in the early grades. These words are not considered a challenge to a native speaker.
  • The Common Core believes that academic vocabulary is the true language of power and that this is particularly true of English Language Learners and a wide variety of students. The standards focus on academic vocabulary as the core object of study.These are words that the Standards refer to as general academic words. They are more likely to appear in written text than speechThey appear in all types of text: informational text ( relative, vary, formulate), technical texts (calibrate, itemize, periphery) and literary text ( faltered, misfortune)They often represent subtle or more precise ways to say simple words – saunter instead of walk
  • * While Tier 3 words are recognized as both important and specific to a subject area and are unfamiliar to most students, teachers often define Tier 3 words. This is, for the most part, not the case with Tier 2 words. Tier 2 words are not unique to a particular content area teacher. Also, Tier 2 words are less defined explicitly and less defined by context clues than Tier 3 words are. However, Tier 2 words are frequently encountered in complex texts and are applicable to many types of reading . There are examples of Tier 2 and Tier 3 words in context in Appendix A.
  • *Because of their specificity and close ties to content knowledge, these words are usually found in informational texts. These words are often recognized as “new” and “hard” for readers and are often defined by the author, used repeatedly and heavily scaffolded ( often appear in dictionaries)
  • Because the Literacy Standards will be a part of the ELA assessment, ELA teachers must continue to increase the amount of informational text used in the classroom.
  • In the second column standard 10 is excluded because it focuses on literary nonfiction; 1-9 are the only standards that should be used when reading informational text.

Ela roll out final Ela roll out final Presentation Transcript

  • 21st Century Skills
  • Curriculum Transition Plan2011-12 Principal Primers: Regional meetings to instruct Principals on new standards.2012-13 . 2013-14 . 2014-15 . Implement Implement Train/Pilot English Math English Social Studies ScienceSocial Studies Train/Pilot Math Science .
  • How Do You Eat An Elephant? One Bite At A Time! Science Math Social Studies ELA
  • Session Objectives• Overview of the English Language Arts Common Core Standards• Description of the English Language Arts Model Curriculum• Update on the future of Ohio’s assessment system
  • First Step: Revised Standards Revised Academic Model Content Curricula: Standards: March 2011 June 2010 Aligned System of Assessments: 2014
  • Out With The OldOhio: “mile-wide and inch deep”Need improved articulation from grade to grade.Too many standardsNot easily managedNo time to teach in depth
  • In With The NewFewer Standards Go DeeperCollege and Career ReadinessCreativity and innovationCritical thinking and problem solvingCommunication and collaborationTechnology literacy
  • PlusPersonal managementProductivity and accountabilityLeadership and responsibilityInterdisciplinary and project-based learning
  • ELA Common Core Standards Framework The major areas or disciplines of study within Strands each content area. “What” studentsshould know and be able to do at each The main focus of the grade level and content within each Topics strand. band. Standard Standards Standards Statements Statements Statements by Grade Level by Grade Level by Grade Level
  • Standard Statement TopicStandard Statement (10)Standard Statement Literature TopicStandard StatementStandard Statement TopicStandard Statement (10) TextStandard Statement Topic InformationalStandard Statement Reading Strand Topic 24 Standard StatementsStandard StatementStandard Statement Topic only (4) K- 5 Founda- tional SkillsStandard Statement TopicStandard Statement TopicStandard StatementStandard Statement TopicStandard Statement Statements 10 StandardStandard Statement Writing Strand TopicStandard StatementStandard Statement TopicStandard Statement andStandard Statement Strand Listening Speaking 6 Standard Statements TopicStandard StatementStandard Statement TopicStandard StatementStandard Statement Strand 6 Standard Topic Statements LanguageStandard Statement
  • English Language Arts Common Core Standards SpeakingReading Writing and Language Strand Strand Listening Strand Strand
  • English Language Arts Common Core Standards SpeakingReading Writing Language and Strand Strand Strand ListeningTopics Topics Topics Topics (4) (4) (2) (3)
  • Key Ideas and Details Craft and Structure Integration of Knowledge and Ideas Strand ReadingRange of Reading and Level of Text Complexity Text Types and Purposes Production and Distribution of Writing Research to Build Knowledge Writing Strand Range of Writing Comprehension and Collaboration and Presentation of Knowledge Strand Listening Speaking and Ideas English Language Arts Common Core Standards Conventions of Standard English Knowledge of Language Strand LanguageVocabulary Acquisition and Use
  • Sub Topics Standard Statement 1 StrandsStandards Standard Statement 2 Key Ideas and Details Standard Statement 3 Standard Statement 4 Standard Statement 5 Craft and Structure Standard Statement 6 Standard Statement 7 Integration of Standard Statement 8 Knowledge Reading: Literature and Ideas Standard Statement 9 Range of Reading and Standard Statement 10 Level of Text Complexity Standard Statement 1 Standard Statement 2 Key Ideas and Details Standard Statement 3 Standard Statement 4 Standard Statement 5 Craft and Structure Standard Statement 6 Reading Strand Standard Statement 7 Integration of Standard Statement 8 Knowledge and Ideas Standard Statement 9 Reading: Informational Text Range of Reading and Standard Statement 10 Level of Text Complexity Standard Statement 1 Print Concepts Standard Statement 2 Phonological Awareness Phonics and Word Skills Standard Statement 3 Recognition Reading: Foundational Standard Statement 4 Fluency
  • Writing Strand Topics Text Types Production and Research and Range and Distribution of Presentation of of Purposes Writing Knowledge WritingStandards Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard Statement Statement Statement Statement Statement Statement Statement Statement Statement Statement 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
  • Speaking and Listening StrandTopics Comprehension Presentation of and Collaboration Knowledge and IdeasStandards Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard Statement Statement Statement Statement Statement Statement 1 2 3 4 5 6
  • Language StrandTopics Knowledge Conventions of of Vocabulary Acquisition and Use Standard English Language Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard Statement Statement Statement Statement Statement Statement 1 2 3 4 5 6Standards
  • ELA Common Core Format Strands Topics Standard Statement
  • Common Core Coding• RL = Reading for Literature• RI = Reading for Information• RF = Reading Foundations• W = Writing• SL = Speaking and Listening• L = Language
  • Sample Code ReadingLiterature Standard 1 RL.1.1 Grade 1
  • CCSS Coding Quiz W.4.3 Writing, Grade 4, Standard 3 RF.2.4Reading Foundations, Grade 2, Standard 4 L.10.3aLanguage, Grade 10, Standard 3a
  • Practice #1Complete questions 1-9 in the Understandingthe English Language Arts Common Core StateStandards and Model Curriculum handout.
  • Additional Components of theCommon Core State Standards
  • Anchor Standards• Broad, foundational standards that define skills that students must demonstrate in order to be college and career ready. – Example: CCR.R.6 • Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.
  • Anchor Standards• Each strand has a set of College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards (CCR) – Reading – 10 Anchor Standards – Writing – 10 Anchor Standards – Speaking and Listening – 6 Anchor Standards – Language – 6 Anchor Standards
  • Anchor Standards Writing Standard 8Anchor Standard: Gather relevant information from multiple print and digitalsources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate theinformation while avoiding plagiarism. Grade 3: Recall information from experiences or gather information from print and digital sources; take brief notes on sources and sort evidence into provided categories. Grade 6: Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources; assess the credibility of each source, and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and providing basic bibliographic information for sources. Grade 9: Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.
  • Practice #2Complete questions 10-12 in the Understandingthe English Language Arts Common Core StateStandards and Model Curriculum handout.
  • Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects • Standards for reading and writing in: – Science – Social Studies – History – Other Technical Subjects**A course devoted to a practical study, such asengineering, technology, design, business, or other workforce-related subject;a technical aspect of a wider field of study, such as art or music. (CCSSGlossary)
  • To What Grade Levels Do They Apply?• Grades 6 – 12• Why not K – 5? – The Literacy Standards are predicated on the assumption that K-5 teachers teach reading and writing across content areas.
  • Where Are They Located?• The Introduction – pp. 1 – 8• K – 5 Standards – pp. 9-33• 6-12 Standards – pp.34 – 58• Literacy Standards – pp.59 - 66
  • Who is Responsible for Teaching the Literacy Standards?“The Standards insist that instruction inreading, writing, speaking, listening, andlanguage be a shared responsibility within theschool.” Introduction to the CCSS, p. 4
  • Appendices• Appendix A – Explains the topic and standard statements that focus on text complexity – Research supporting key elements of the standards – Glossary of Key Terms
  • Appendices• Appendix B – Focuses on texts that can be used to meet the standards • Text Exemplars • Sample Performance Tasks
  • Appendices• Appendix C – Offers writing exemplars that highlight the standard statements • Student writing exemplars
  • Next Step: Model Curricula Revised Academic Model Content Curricula: Standards: March 2011 June 2010 Aligned System of Assessments: 2014
  • What is the Model Curriculum?A Web-based tool, aligned to the standards, that:• Presents information specific to the content area by grade level, grade band, and course• Provides curricular and instructional guidance• Includes instructional strategies and resources• Informs assessment development
  • Progressions – these statements provide educators with a general description of the content students had prior to that grade band and the contentMODEL CURRICULUM students are expected to master in the next grade band. Standard Statements Content Elaborations – Information for the teacher designed to clarify and extend understanding of the content standards. Content elaborations are specific to topics and grade/grade bands. Enduring Understanding – Jay McTighe (Understanding by Design, 1998) developed this definition, enduring understandings provide a larger purpose for learning the targeted content, and they implicitly answer the question, “Why is this topic worth studying?”
  • Instructional Strategies – Suggestions of research based instructional methods that can be used to address the content standards and topics. Instructional Resources – Materials (print and nonprint) designed forMODEL CURRICULUM use in instruction or to provide professional development/ enrichment that address the content standards. Technology – ideas for authentic and ethical use of technology and multimedia tools to increase content understanding as well as enhance productivity and communication for both students and classroom teachers. Diverse Learners--ideas for adapting instruction and content to meet the needs of all students.
  • Practice #3Complete questions 13-16 in the Understandingthe English Language Arts Common Core StateStandards and Model Curriculum handout.
  • 4-Square ActivitySquare 1 Square 2 Strand, topic, sub-topic, standard statements): What must students know (knowledge – concepts, vocabulary, processes)?Square 3 Square 4 What must students be able to do What are the significant understandings (performance and skills)? students should develop? What are the best way(s) for students to demonstrate what they know and can do? 46
  • 4-Square ActivityActivityWe will go through the squares one at a time toexplain them, providing you with guided practice.Then, you will use the blank analysis sheet in smallgroups, for practice. 47
  • 4-Square Activity Strand, topic, content statements):Strand  Topic  Content StatementAlignment tool 48
  • 4-Square Activity What must students know (knowledge – concepts, vocabulary, processes)?Knowledge  Factual  Conceptual  Procedural  Metacognitive 49
  • 4-Square Activity Thinking skillsWhat must students be able to do (performanceand skills)?What are the best way(s) for students todemonstrate what they know and can do? Demonstration 50
  • 4-Square Activity Enduring Relevant What are the significant understandings students should develop?Inferential Significant 51
  • 52
  • 4-Square ActivityDirections1. Select group members to serve as recorder, timekeeper and reporter.2. With your group, select a strand, topic and content statement that might link to the content in a unit that you brought.3. Complete Square 14. Complete the remaining squares.5. Share responses. 53
  • 4-Square ActivityThink – Pair - ShareHow can the 4-Square Activity assist incurriculum development? 54
  • Part II 55
  • Session Objectives• To promote a deeper understanding of the English Language Arts Common Core State Standards by examining the instructional shifts in – Reading – Writing Curriculum Revision – Language• To provide an update on assessment 56
  • READING: KEY SHIFTS IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 57
  • Standard Statement 1 Standard Statement 2 Key Ideas and Details Standard Statement 3 Standard Statement 4 Standard Statement 5 Craft and Structure Standard Statement 6 Standard Statement 7 Integration of Standard Statement 8 Knowledge Reading: Literature and Ideas Standard Statement 9 Range of Reading and Standard Statement 10 Level of Text Complexity Standard Statement 1 Standard Statement 2 Key Ideas and Details Standard Statement 3 Standard Statement 4 Standard Statement 5 Craft and Structure Standard Statement 6 Reading Strand Standard Statement 7 Integration of Standard Statement 8 Knowledge and Ideas Standard Statement 9 Reading: Informational Text Range of Reading and Standard Statement 10 Level of Text Complexity Standard Statement 1 Print Concepts Standard Statement 2 Phonological Awareness Phonics and Word Skills Standard Statement 3 Recognition Reading: Foundational Standard Statement 4 Fluency58
  • Reading Shifts• A new understanding of close reading• A focus on considerations of text complexity• The inclusion of literary nonfiction at grades 6-12 59
  • Close Reading: What is it? Teach students to “Read like Detectives.” interrogating what texts tell us about the way things are and whyDiscussion Question: What does a detective do that can be compared to a reader engaging with a text? 60
  • By engaging students effectively with rich texts that challenge them to do increasingly more complex cognitive work, we help students become more skilled at getting more out of texts. Close reading helps students learn to analyze the world around them and look to texts for information that they can question and interpret on their own. 61
  • Close Reading: How?1. Don’t summarize what the text is about; allow students the luxury of discovering this for themselves. (Make them think!)2. Allow the text to reveal itself to them as readers/detectives.3. Lavish time and attention on text that deserves it.• Remember: the teacher is not the expert; the text is. 62
  • Close Reading: How?1. Allow them to read text to themselves.2. Read text aloud to them so they can hear the language as it is meant to be heard.3. Analyze text by using text-dependent discussion questions.4. Discuss author’s use of academic vocabulary. 63
  • Close Reading: Resource Bringing Common Core to Life video:• http://vimeo.com/27056255• one hour demonstration by David Coleman (one of the key authors of CCSS)• video and handouts available on ODE Web site• highly recommended as PD for ELA departments 64
  • Text Complexity: What?Strand: ReadingTopic: Range of Reading and Level of Text ComplexityStandard 10: Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently. 65
  • Text Complexity: Why?• Research shows a steady decline in the level of text complexity in classroom instruction over the last half century. (Appendix A, p.2)• Research indicates that the demands college, careers, and citizenship place on readers have either held steady or increased over the last half century. (Appendix A, p. 1) 66
  • Text Complexity: How? 67
  • Quantitative Features of Text ComplexityDimensions such as• Word Frequency• Sentence Length• Word Length• Text Length• Text Cohesion 68
  • Qualitative Features of Text Complexity Dimensions such as: • Levels of meaning • Levels of purpose • Structure/Organization • Language conventionality • Language clarity • Prior knowledge demands 69
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  • Reader and Task Consideration Considerations such as: • Motivation • Knowledge and experience • Purpose for reading • Complexity of task assigned regarding text • Complexity of questions asked regarding text 71
  • introducing background knowledge immersing students in more complex language exposure and usage that makes a difference in their ability to access knowledge engaging students with carefully selected or constructed graphic organizers that make the structure of the text visible modeling how to interpret the meaning of texts that use more complex approaches, like satire or rhetorical argument engaging pairs or teams of students with more challenging texts as “buddies” and giving them opportunities to reflect on those texts through discussions with each other or through “buddy” journalsmaking 20 percent of their class reading “stretch” texts that help them reachbeyond their reading level 72
  • Literary Nonfiction: Why?Reading Informational TextStandard 10Grade 6 & 7By the end of the year, read and comprehendliterary nonfiction in the grades 6–8 textcomplexity band proficiently, with scaffolding asneeded at the high end of the range. 73
  • Literary Nonfiction: What?“…creative nonfiction” describes what the form isall about. The word creative simply refers to the useof literary craft in presenting nonfiction - thatis, factually accurate prose about real people andevents – in a compelling and vivid manner. To put itanother way, creative nonfiction writers do notmake things up; they make ideas and informationthat already exist more interesting and often moreaccessible.” Lee Guskind 74
  • Literary Nonfiction: NAEP’S Definition• May include elements of narration and exposition and is often referred to as mixed text• Includes essays; speeches; opinion pieces, biographies; journalism; and historical scientific or other documents written for a broad audience• It uses literary techniques usually associated with fiction or poetry and also presents information or factual material 75
  • Lexile ScoresScantron can produce lexilescores that can link to thespecific text complexity of thestudent.
  • Practice #4Answer questions 17-21 77
  • WRITING: KEY SHIFTS IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 78
  • Writing Strand Text Types Production and Research and Range and Distribution of Presentation of of Purposes Writing Knowledge Writing Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard StandardStatement Statement Statement Statement Statement Statement Statement Statement Statement Statement 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 79
  • Writing Shifts• An increase in writing to sources• Emphasis on writing that marshals arguments (using evidence, evidence, eviden ce)• A significant increase in the amount of research writing (short and frequent projects) 80
  • Writing to Sources: What?• CCR.W.9 – draw evidence from literary or informational text to support analysis, reflection, and research• Teachers must be able to: – Create text-dependent writing prompts that require students to rely primarily on the text to support their arguments/responses• Students must be able to: – Analyze and synthesize text – Present careful analysis, well-defended claims, and clear information through their writing 81
  • What does it look like in grade 3? Text Dependent Non-Text DependentAsk and answer questions One of the themes in theregarding the plot of Patricia book, Sarah, Plain and Tall, isMacLachlan’s Sarah, Plain and loss. Write about a time whenTall, explicitly referring to the you or someone you knowbook to form the basis for experienced the loss of atheir answers. [RL.3.1] loved one. 82
  • What does it look like in grade 6? Text Dependent Non-Text DependentAnalyze in detail how the early years Create a story in which theof Harriet Tubman (as related by main character is on theauthor Ann Petry) contributed to her underground railroad. Whatlater becoming a conductor on theUnderground Railroad, attending to would life be like for thishow the author introduces, character?illustrates, and elaborates upon theevents in Tubman’s life. [RI.6.3] 83
  • What does it look like in grades 9-10? Text Dependent Non-Text DependentAnalyze in detail the theme of Explore the ways that bothrelationships between mothers and Chinese and Americandaughters and how that theme superstitions drive thoughtsdevelops over the course of AmyTan’s The Joy Luck Club. Students and choices. Does superstitionsearch the text for specific details help generations connect, orthat show how the theme emerges does it separate them?and how it is shaped and refinedover the course of the novel. [RL.9–10.2] 84
  • Writing to Sources: How?Three practices for strengthening readingthrough writing: 1. Have students write about the text they read (taking notes, answering questions, learning logs, summaries, or extended response) 2. Teach students the writing skills and processes that go into creating text 3. Increase the amount of time students write. 85
  • Marshaling Arguments: What?• CCR.W.1 – Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.• The ability to write logical arguments based on substantive claims, sound reasoning, and relevant evidence 86
  • Argument vs. Persuasion in the Common Core Persuasion ArgumentAppeals to the credibility, Convinces the audience becausecharacter, or authority of the of the perceived merit andwriter (speaker) reasonableness of the claims andAppeals to the audience’s self- proofs offered rather thaninterest and sense of identity evoking emotions.Relies on emotional appeals Requires evidenceEvokes emotions 87
  • Marshaling Arguments: Why?When students consider two or moreperspectives on a topic or issue, something far beyond surface knowledge is required . They must – Think critically and deeply – Assess the validity of their own thinking – Anticipate counterclaims in opposition to their own assertions 88
  • Marshaling Arguments: How?• Students must be able to effectively arrange their thoughts to support their reasoning.• Writing must reflect evidence of close analytic reading of complex text.• Writing must show evidence of either advancing an argument or explaining an idea. 89
  • Research: What?• CCR.W.7 Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation• Should have a meaningful, focused connection to the text (where possible)• Should encourage students to read closely to compare concepts and synthesize ideas across multiple texts 90
  • Research as the Vehicle Research projects allow for and promote: • Close reading • Text complexity increase • Increase in literary nonfiction • Writing to sources • Exposure to academic vocabulary • Presentation skills (Speaking and Listening) 91
  • Research: Why?The new assessments will assess the research standards. 92
  • Research: How?• Students should have multiple opportunities for research (short, as well as sustained projects).• Students should utilize multiple forms of technology to produce, publish, and collaborate with others. 93
  • Writing PracticeAnswer Question 22Trace the progressions of CCR.W.6-9 from K-CCR.Pay particular attention to your grade level.Consider the following: – What specific skills are needed to meet these standard statements? – What other strands should be incorporated to help support this shift? – What do these standard statements look like in your classroom? – In the standard statements that remain the same from grade to grade, how do you plan to increase the complexity? 94
  • Writing Reflection TakeawayAfter examining the vertical articulation documentfor standard statements 6-9, assess your currentresearch practices/projects. Based on what wasreviewed in the vertical articulationdocument, consider the following: – Where do your projects land on the grade continuum? – Which skills require an increase in complexity? – What specific strategies adequately prepare students for the skills needed in the next grade level/band? 95
  • Take away: Research InventoryTo determine how well you integrate research into yourinstruction, take an inventory of your classroom planning andinstruction.• What is your approach to teaching research?• Examine your lesson plans. Over the course of two weeks, how many opportunities are given to allow for research?• Take a look at your lessons. How often do you incorporate writing to sources into your literary or informational text selections?• How often are students given the opportunity to share their research with others?• What are the various forms of technology integrated into your 96 research project?
  • LANGUAGE: KEY SHIFTS IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 97
  • Language Strand Knowledge Conventions of of Vocabulary Acquisition and Use Standard English Language Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard StandardStatement Statement Statement Statement Statement Statement 1 2 3 4 5 6 98
  • Vocabulary Shift• Increased emphasis on academic vocabulary as a critical component of college and career readiness.• Information in the following slides has been taken from Isabel Beck’s book, Bringing Words to Life. 99
  • Vocabulary – What to teach?• Not all words have equal importance in language instruction.• The CCSS considers three types of vocabulary words or three tiers of vocabulary – for teaching and assessing word knowledge.• A word’s frequency of use, complexity, and meaning determines into which tier it will fall. 100
  • Tier 1 –Basic Vocabulary• The words of everyday speech, usually learned in the early grades.• These words are not considered a challenge to the average native speaker.• Words in this tier rarely require direct instruction and typically do not have multiple meanings.• Examples: clock, baby, happy, walk 101
  • Tier 2 – Academic Vocabulary• Tier 2 words, or academic vocabulary, pervade complex text of all types.• They are an underlying language of complexity that pervades everything complex that students read. 102
  • Tier 2- Academic VocabularyThe following is a list of characteristics for TierTwo words: – Important for reading comprehension – Contain multiple meanings – Increased descriptive vocabulary (words that allow students to describe concepts in a detailed manner) – Used across a variety of domains, occurs more frequently in literature 103
  • Tier 3- Low-Frequency, Content- Specific Vocabulary• Specific to a domain or field of study• Far more common in informational texts than in literature.• Explicitly defined by the author of a text• Repeatedly used• Heavily scaffolded (e.g., made part of a glossary) 104
  • How will the Literacy Standards be assessed?• The expectation is that all content area teachers make use of the Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects standards for instruction.• However, the ELA assessment may include texts based on the Literacy Standards. 105
  • Informational Text Grades 6 - 12If you are Literary Informational History, Socialusing a Nonfiction Text Studies, Science,selection Technicalwhich is Subjects TextUse these Reading Reading Literacystandards Informational Informational Standards Text Text Standards #1-10 Standards # 1- 9 106
  • • Answer question 23.
  • What can teachers do now?• Focus on content depth• Integrate the concepts and skills from reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language into instructional units. Avoid teaching skills in isolation.• Use formative instructional strategies and assessments K-12.• Develop the students’ ability to view themselves as effective readers and writers – as effective communicators.
  • What can teachers do now?• Use resources that connect the English Language Arts concepts and skills in the classroom to the outside world, which adds relevance to what is being taught.• Become familiar with the Content Elaborations and Enduring Understandings found in the Model Curriculum which is posted online.• Promote performance-based assessment.• Plan and implement appropriate professional development for both teachers and administrators, building both content and pedagogical knowledge for students as well as educators.
  • Quiz Name the four strands found in theCommon Core State Standards for ELA • Reading (Literature and Informational Text) • Writing • Speaking and Listening • Language
  • Name the topics found in the Reading Literature Strand• Key Ideas and Details• Craft and Structure• Integration of Knowledge and Ideas• Range and Level of Complex Texts
  • Where can you find more information about calculating text complexity? Appendix A
  • Where can you find exemplars of student writing? Appendix C
  • Where can you find deeper explanationsabout what the standards expect students to know and be able to do? Model Curriculum: Content Elaborations
  • What type of support can you find at www.cast.org?Resources and strategies for diverselearners including English LanguageLearners, students with disabilities andgifted students