10
Quick
Forma.ve
Assessments For
a
Differen.ated
Classroom              With
Judy
Dodge        Educa.onal
Consultant
&
Aut...
• “Stop
and
Process”
Ac.vi.es:  – Ask,
yourself,
“Am
I
teaching
so
that
students
will
    learn
or
am
I
teaching
just
so
t...
Checks for Understanding• “Stop
and
Process”
Ac.vi.es:  – Ask,
yourself,
“Am
I
teaching
so
that
students
will
    learn
or...
Have
students
                 
“Make
a
Connec.on!”•   A]er
a
mini‐lecture,
class
discussion,
text
reading,
video,
or
Powe...
Forma.ve
Assessment

• Assessment   FOR   learning, not        OF   learning• An on-going process used during instruction•...
“Whoever explains learns”                               David Sousa• Provide
mul$ple
opportuni$es
for
students
to
explain
...
Inclusive vs. Exclusive                   Questioning• Focus
on
Inclusive
Ques$oning,
not
Exclusive
Ques.oning •          ...
Chunk Lessons According to            Age• “May
I
please
leave?

My
brain
is
full.”• Students
can
focus
and
aiend
for
a
li...
“We must save to the hard           drive”• To
place
informa.on
into
long‐term
memory,
  – do
something
with
that
informa....
What Kinds of Assessments            Can I Easily Use?• Carousel
Brainstorm              •    Post‐A‐Point!• A
“Stop‐n‐Jot...
When and how often should I use a           formative assessment?• Once
or
twice
during
a
class
period• Midway
and
at
the
...
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  • 10 quick formative assessments

    1. 1. 10
Quick
Forma.ve
Assessments For
a
Differen.ated
Classroom With
Judy
Dodge Educa.onal
Consultant
&
Author Differenaon
in
Acon
(Scholas.c,
2005) 25
Quick
Formave
Assessments
for
a
Differenated
Classroom
 (Scholas.c,
2009) judydodge@judydodge.com ©2010
Judith
Dodge
    2. 2. • “Stop
and
Process”
Ac.vi.es: – Ask,
yourself,
“Am
I
teaching
so
that
students
will
 learn
or
am
I
teaching
just
so
that
I
can
cover
the
 required
material?”
 
 
 
 
 (adapted
from
Rick
Wormeli,
2005) COVERAGE
≠
UNDERSTANDING Memoriza.on
does
not
lead
to
transference Provide
.me
for
student
reflec.on ©2010 Judith Dodge
    3. 3. Checks for Understanding• “Stop
and
Process”
Ac.vi.es: – Ask,
yourself,
“Am
I
teaching
so
that
students
will
 learn
or
am
I
teaching
just
so
that
I
can
cover
the
 required
material?”
 
 
 
 
 (adapted
from
Rick
Wormeli,
2005) COVERAGE
≠
UNDERSTANDING Memoriza.on
does
not
lead
to
transference Provide
.me
for
student
reflec.on ©2010 Judith Dodge
    4. 4. Have
students
 
“Make
a
Connec.on!”• A]er
a
mini‐lecture,
class
discussion,
text
reading,
video,
or
PowerPoint…• Have
students
make
their
own
connecons
and
share
with
the
class – Compare
two
characters,
two
books,
two
authors’
styles… – Note
a
sequence – Predict
a
future
outcome – Recognize
a
cause
or
effect – Make
a
text‐to‐self,
text‐to‐text,
text‐to‐world
connec.on – Suggest
a
character’s
mo.va.on – Describe
and
internal
or
external
conflict ©2010 Judith Dodge
    5. 5. Forma.ve
Assessment

• Assessment FOR learning, not OF learning• An on-going process used during instruction• A “snapshot” vs. a “photo album” of assessment (Jay McTighe)• Provides students with feedback• Informs decision-making for future teacher instruction and student learning tactics ©2010 Judith Dodge
    6. 6. “Whoever explains learns” David Sousa• Provide
mul$ple
opportuni$es
for
students
to
explain
what
 they
are
learning• Guide
assigned
“Learning
Partners”
to
interact
through
a
 daily
(Turn’n’Talk).

If
need
be,
hold
partners
accountable
for
staying
 on
task
by
requiring
a
wriLen
task
to
be
completed
by
each
student ©2010 Judith Dodge
    7. 7. Inclusive vs. Exclusive Questioning• Focus
on
Inclusive
Ques$oning,
not
Exclusive
Ques.oning • Exclusive
Quesoning:• Ask
a
ques.on;
call
on
one
student:
exclude
all
others – “Can
anyone
add
something?” – “Do
you
agree,
Damen?” • Inclusive
Quesoning:• Ask
a
ques.on;
have
every
student
respond: – Turn’n’talk
 – Stop’n’Jot!

 – QuickWrite!
 – Dry
Erase
Boards ©2010 Judith Dodge
    8. 8. Chunk Lessons According to Age• “May
I
please
leave?

My
brain
is
full.”• Students
can
focus
and
aiend
for
a
limited
 amount
of
.me
 
 
 
 
 

 Add
2
to
their
age


7
years
old








9
minutes
 
 
 
 
 13
years
old





15
minutes
 
 
 
 
 15
years
old
 



17
minutes ©2010 Judith Dodge
    9. 9. “We must save to the hard drive”• To
place
informa.on
into
long‐term
memory,
 – do
something
with
that
informa.on
soon
a9er
 being
exposed
to
it
for
the
very
first
$me. – reflect,
respond,
record,
tell,
describe,
illustrate,
 explain,
discuss,
summarize,
draw,
use,
re‐ organize,
predict,
hypothesize,
evaluate,
and/or
 judge
(Reflect
and
“Make
a
Connecon!!”) ©2010 Judith Dodge
    10. 10. What Kinds of Assessments Can I Easily Use?• Carousel
Brainstorm • Post‐A‐Point!• A
“Stop‐n‐Jot!” • Pair
Squared• Turn‐n‐Talk • S‐O‐S
Summary• A
“QuickWrite” • Four
More!• Here
I
Stand! • An
Exit
Card ©2010 Judith Dodge
    11. 11. When and how often should I use a formative assessment?• Once
or
twice
during
a
class
period• Midway
and
at
the
end
of
a
class
period• Every
.me
you
switch
a
topic
• At
the
end
of
your
students
“focus”
.me:

 
 their
age
+
2• 
Any
.me
you
see
you
sense
uncertainty,


 confusion
or
 passivity
in
students ©2010 Judith Dodge

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