Building Data-centric Media Organizations
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Building Data-centric Media Organizations

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A presentation prepared for KSFR, a public radio station in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. The main point is that the station should develop a "digital first" approach to all aspects pertaining to its ...

A presentation prepared for KSFR, a public radio station in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. The main point is that the station should develop a "digital first" approach to all aspects pertaining to its Audience(s), Content and Technologies.

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  • Hello: <br /> I’m Tom Johnson, managing director of the Inst. for Analytic Journalism, a small non-profit in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The IAJ focuses on training journalists and researching digital applications and analytic tools that, we hope, will enhance the profession of journalism, both for the practitioners and for the societies we serve. <br /> A friend of mine, John Andrews, is on the board of directors of the foundation responsible for KSFR, our public radio station here in north central New Mexico. A few days ago, John asked me to pull together some of my thinking about what the station might do to thrive in the Digital Age. What could the NNMRF and KSFR do to keep the station viable in the rapidly changing information ecosystem and serve our communities in a way that would make the organization indispensable? <br /> I will run down some ideas, but first let me describe my working assumptions. [CLICK] <br />
  • Foundation Assumptions <br /> We are not a radio station, we are in the business of communications. Today, that must include not just signals through the air waves, but text archives, pictures, video, real-time updating of data for events like elections and forest fires. <br /> Sundown for “Mass Media” – infinite decisions made by individuals, not some higher authority, about when, where, why and how they will get their news, entertainment, educational data <br /> First “serve the communities” <br /> Need definition and re-definition of our “communities” – geographic, topical, cultural. We have essentially no hard data on those communities, and the initiative by Peter Lloyd to work with the Marketing dept. at UNM is certainly a valuable start. <br /> The Three 100s <br /> 100% of the people in a system have access to… <br /> 100% of the data and tools they need to do their job but explore possibilities… <br /> 100% of the time – literally 24/7 from anywhere in the world <br /> Data In  Analysis  Info Out and it’s all digital <br /> Every aspect of media institutions revolves around taking in data of all types – text, quantitative, imagery – analyzing it and reaching some conclusions which result in a decision to do something or not do something. That’s the INFORMATION OUT process. What news stories do we broadcast? What songs do we play or talk-show guests to invite, etc. <br /> The information ecosystem is literally changing constantly. Such a dynamic data environment requires continuous <br /> Learning <br /> Experimentation <br /> Peer Teaching <br /> So, given these assumptions, what does a contemporary media organization look like? [CLICK] I see it as a vast digital data warehouse, a warehouse that is the hub of everything – the agora, the forum, the plaza, the marketplace. That’s the abstract, [CLICK] but it actually is composed of three components. <br />
  • Foundation Assumptions <br /> Everyone’s job – “everyone” = board, staff, producers, volunteers -- includes research, exploration/experimentation, sharing/teaching and doing it again <br /> Think Digital First <br /> All communication can/should be perceived as bi- and often multi-directional <br /> Our on-air talent can/should be open to receiving comments, suggestions, questions from listeners everywhere that are communicated with multiple media forms – Tweets, Facebook comments, etc. This builds intimate relationships between our audiences and communities, relationships that translate into financial and volunteer support <br /> We have few unique challenges <br /> The U.S. hundreds of small public –radio stations, all of which are facing the same challenges we are – financial, technology, personnel and management, programming. We limit our potential by only looking inward for solutions. We must take advantage of those professional conversations. They are typically free or low cost. Yes, it takes time, but the ROI quickly becomes obvious, I think. <br /> If you can’t measure it, you can’t manage it <br /> So an event is proposed. What are all the costs to doing that event? – not just dollar costs but the person hours (which need to be tabulated to use as content in not just grant proposals, but show the public the degree of commitment). And how do the costs balance against the expected return? <br /> Or we are doing an on-air pledge drive? What are the goals? Not just the gross amount target, but how many new contributors? How many new sustaining members? What’s the average donation and can that be increased? <br />
  • So were looking to build a digital warehouse -- one that contains all the data needed to run the radio station, coordinate the staff, board and volunteers, relate to its communities around the globe, enhance revenues and encourage creative experimentation in entertainment, education and community enrichment. <br /> So we start by understanding that this warehouse has three major components that are all digital: [CLICK] <br />
  • At some early point: <br /> ALL DATA (broadly defined as text, audio, Video, applications) is digital, existing primarily as a string of 1s and Zeros. That means it can be manipulated, accessed for anywhere anytime <br /> Second, the TECHNOLOGY to manage that data and those applications is also a string of 1s and Zeros operating under the same conditions. <br /> Third, the station has multiple audiences, who also are contributing and taking from the 1s and Zeros stored in that data warehouse. [CLICK] <br /> Let’s start with the AUDIENCE <br />
  • Listeners – the classic questions of journalism apply: <br /> Who, What, When, Where, Why, How? <br /> The audiences can be described – and measured -- Geographically or by their … <br /> Interests <br /> The station can also gather data related to Sponsors/underwriters <br /> Producers <br /> Staff <br /> Board [CLICK] <br /> Most aspects of the audiences can be described with and related to via digital data [CLICK] <br /> You can capture that data (sometimes with effort) using free or cheap tools [CLICK] <br /> You can efficiently communicate with all these audiences … [CLICK] <br /> …to coordinate content, raise funds, solicit a corps of volunteers to… [CLICK] <br /> promote station, talent, events, good works [CLICK] <br /> But YES, dedicated, on-going training IS required to do all of this <br /> Next, consider the CONTENT aspect of the Data Warehouse[CLICK] <br />
  • Listeners – the classic questions of journalism apply: <br /> Who, What, When, Where, Why, How? <br /> The audiences can be described – and measured -- Geographically or by their … <br /> Interests <br /> The station can also gather data related to Sponsors/underwriters <br /> Producers <br /> Staff <br /> Board [CLICK] <br /> Most aspects of the audiences can be described with and related to via digital data [CLICK] <br /> You can capture that data (sometimes with effort) using free or cheap tools [CLICK] <br /> You can efficiently communicate with all these audiences … [CLICK] <br /> …to coordinate content, raise funds, solicit a corps of volunteers to… [CLICK] <br /> promote station, talent, events, good works [CLICK] <br /> But YES, dedicated, on-going training IS required to do all of this <br /> Next, consider the CONTENT aspect of the Data Warehouse[CLICK] <br />
  • Start by taking the “Our Town” (KSFR) perspective and building a data base of the current players <br /> That means Quickly creating a searchable DB of board, staff, producers and interested supporters. That would include <br /> Names, addresses (to be geocoded), interests, skills (everything from literature to SCUBA diving), languages, their multiple points of contact – phone, Facebook, Twitter, etc. <br /> Why? For starters, the news department can develop a quickly searchable pool of eye-witnesses [CLICK] <br /> Next, the Station’s PROGRAMMING CONTENT. That includes… <br /> News <br /> Music <br /> Talk <br /> Public Service <br /> Podcasts <br /> You could build a Rich archive and links to resources as they emerge. That means when Mary-Charlotte has a guest from the Animal Shelter, you link from her show to the Animal Shelter, but also enter that link into station’s larger DB of resources. (NB: such links need to be tested regularly, but you can do so with automation andbots <br /> This also lays the foundation for Promotional campaigns and bi-directional communications <br /> Your Social media plans would live here as well. [CLICK] <br /> The Data Hub should also include FINANCIAL DATA <br /> Surveys <br /> Donors <br /> Type? <br /> Sponsors <br /> Grants <br /> Then you have EVENTS [CLICK] <br /> EVENTS – This would include <br /> Planning [CLICK FOR EVENT TEMPLATE IMAGE] with collaborative tools to manage the planning and execution. <br /> And what about, again, Audiences and Coverage – Who bought tickets? Did you capture their e-mail and other contact points? Who and How are thank you notes dispatched? <br /> The Content should also include data and information related to the always-important TRAINING mission[CLICK] <br /> TRAINING – Such would be tied to calendars, schedules, notices, topics and materials, archive <br /> The Data Hub would be the primary source for coordinated [CLICK FOR DASHBOARD IMAGE] <br /> Community communications <br /> This would typically hold data from and related to the Board of directors, its data/activities/documents <br /> It also would be a point-of-entry for recruiting and coordinating volunteers <br /> Finally, the Data Hub would hold data reflecting [CLICK] <br /> Serious, regular DATA ANALYSIS <br /> Again, Listener analysis, but also <br /> Fine-grained analysis of sponsors (what are they getting for their money), donors (What, when, why, who, Where and How do they donate) <br /> What his the history of the Status of your terrestrial signal <br /> Status of your digital listeners <br /> When do people listen? <br /> With what types of devices? <br /> How long to they listen, etc. <br /> Clearly, some of this data would have to live behind a walled garden of security, but – as I will argue in a minute – the default should be to make as much of the analytic data accessible as possible. This would make it easier for potential donors to find out what the station is doing; make it easier for potential sponsors to decide to back your efforts. <br />
  • Start by taking the “Our Town” (KSFR) perspective and building a data base of the current players <br /> That means Quickly creating a searchable DB of board, staff, producers and interested supporters. That would include <br /> Names, addresses (to be geocoded), interests, skills (everything from literature to SCUBA diving), languages, their multiple points of contact – phone, Facebook, Twitter, etc. <br /> Why? For starters, the news department can develop a quickly searchable pool of eye-witnesses [CLICK] <br /> Next, the Station’s PROGRAMMING CONTENT. That includes… <br /> News <br /> Music <br /> Talk <br /> Public Service <br /> Podcasts <br /> You could build a Rich archive and links to resources as they emerge. That means when Mary-Charlotte has a guest from the Animal Shelter, you link from her show to the Animal Shelter, but also enter that link into station’s larger DB of resources. (NB: such links need to be tested regularly, but you can do so with automation andbots <br /> This also lays the foundation for Promotional campaigns and bi-directional communications <br /> Your Social media plans would live here as well. [CLICK] <br /> The Data Hub should also include FINANCIAL DATA <br /> Surveys <br /> Donors <br /> Type? <br /> Sponsors <br /> Grants <br /> Then you have EVENTS [CLICK] <br /> EVENTS – This would include <br /> Planning [CLICK FOR EVENT TEMPLATE IMAGE] with collaborative tools to manage the planning and execution. <br /> And what about, again, Audiences and Coverage – Who bought tickets? Did you capture their e-mail and other contact points? Who and How are thank you notes dispatched? <br /> The Content should also include data and information related to the always-important TRAINING mission[CLICK] <br /> TRAINING – Such would be tied to calendars, schedules, notices, topics and materials, archive <br /> The Data Hub would be the primary source for coordinated [CLICK FOR DASHBOARD IMAGE] <br /> Community communications <br /> This would typically hold data from and related to the Board of directors, its data/activities/documents <br /> It also would be a point-of-entry for recruiting and coordinating volunteers <br /> Finally, the Data Hub would hold data reflecting [CLICK] <br /> Serious, regular DATA ANALYSIS <br /> Again, Listener analysis, but also <br /> Fine-grained analysis of sponsors (what are they getting for their money), donors (What, when, why, who, Where and How do they donate) <br /> What his the history of the Status of your terrestrial signal <br /> Status of your digital listeners <br /> When do people listen? <br /> With what types of devices? <br /> How long to they listen, etc. <br /> Clearly, some of this data would have to live behind a walled garden of security, but – as I will argue in a minute – the default should be to make as much of the analytic data accessible as possible. This would make it easier for potential donors to find out what the station is doing; make it easier for potential sponsors to decide to back your efforts. <br />
  • Start by taking the “Our Town” (KSFR) perspective and building a data base of the current players <br /> That means Quickly creating a searchable DB of board, staff, producers and interested supporters. That would include <br /> Names, addresses (to be geocoded), interests, skills (everything from literature to SCUBA diving), languages, their multiple points of contact – phone, Facebook, Twitter, etc. <br /> Why? For starters, the news department can develop a quickly searchable pool of eye-witnesses [CLICK] <br /> Next, the Station’s PROGRAMMING CONTENT. That includes… <br /> News <br /> Music <br /> Talk <br /> Public Service <br /> Podcasts <br /> You could build a Rich archive and links to resources as they emerge. That means when Mary-Charlotte has a guest from the Animal Shelter, you link from her show to the Animal Shelter, but also enter that link into station’s larger DB of resources. (NB: such links need to be tested regularly, but you can do so with automation andbots <br /> This also lays the foundation for Promotional campaigns and bi-directional communications <br /> Your Social media plans would live here as well. [CLICK] <br /> The Data Hub should also include FINANCIAL DATA <br /> Surveys <br /> Donors <br /> Type? <br /> Sponsors <br /> Grants <br /> Then you have EVENTS [CLICK] <br /> EVENTS – This would include <br /> Planning [CLICK FOR EVENT TEMPLATE IMAGE] with collaborative tools to manage the planning and execution. <br /> And what about, again, Audiences and Coverage – Who bought tickets? Did you capture their e-mail and other contact points? Who and How are thank you notes dispatched? <br /> The Content should also include data and information related to the always-important TRAINING mission[CLICK] <br /> TRAINING – Such would be tied to calendars, schedules, notices, topics and materials, archive <br /> The Data Hub would be the primary source for coordinated [CLICK FOR DASHBOARD IMAGE] <br /> Community communications <br /> This would typically hold data from and related to the Board of directors, its data/activities/documents <br /> It also would be a point-of-entry for recruiting and coordinating volunteers <br /> Finally, the Data Hub would hold data reflecting [CLICK] <br /> Serious, regular DATA ANALYSIS <br /> Again, Listener analysis, but also <br /> Fine-grained analysis of sponsors (what are they getting for their money), donors (What, when, why, who, Where and How do they donate) <br /> What his the history of the Status of your terrestrial signal <br /> Status of your digital listeners <br /> When do people listen? <br /> With what types of devices? <br /> How long to they listen, etc. <br /> Clearly, some of this data would have to live behind a walled garden of security, but – as I will argue in a minute – the default should be to make as much of the analytic data accessible as possible. This would make it easier for potential donors to find out what the station is doing; make it easier for potential sponsors to decide to back your efforts. <br />
  • Serious, regular data analysis <br /> To my knowledge, this has not been done for years except for some of the work I did using minimal data. <br /> Yet there are analytic tools available – though never as precise as we would hope – that can give us some clues about out listenership. <br /> For example, You can get Average Quarter Hour listener numbers on KSFr as part of the “secondary counties” in the greater ABQ market. [CLICK] <br /> This CONTENT POOL could include data about [CLICK] <br /> Sponsors and Listeners <br /> You can -- using a free program called Google Analytics – get data from the KSFR web site that indicates when, from where and how your online listeners are tuned in to the station. <br /> And there are applications in the works that track computer IP addresses down to the county level with some degree of validity. The station could be investigating those. <br /> You would like to know the Status of your DIGITAL listeners <br /> When do people listen? <br /> With what types of devices? <br /> How long to they listen, etc. <br /> All of this is available with a variety of free or cheap tools. You also would like to know what is the …. <br /> Status of the KSFR terrestrial signal – How much is potential support are you missing because people can’t hear the station over-the-air? <br /> All of this information will be valuable to your SPONSORS, who are always wondering what are they getting for their money), [CLICK] <br /> Status of your terrestrial signal [CLICK] <br /> An on-going problem is that given the Northern New Mexico terrain, reception of the traditional signal is highly variable. The solution is possible and expensive – and a ways off for KSFR, but there are companies out there that analyze the position of your antenna relative to the hills, valleys and mountains of the potential broadcast footprint. They then pin-point the homes and the demographics of the residents to produce an index of potential revenue IF the signal’s reception could be improved. Yes, expensive, but something with a potentially measurable ROI. <br /> But again, this is the type of digital data that could be in the station’s data center and leveraged for financial benefit and insights into our listenership. [CLICK] <br />
  • The default perspective in the culture has to be that everything is digital; that everything is easily accessible; and that everything is open to the all the communities as the wish [CLICK] <br /> Once you have a mind-set that all the data should be in digital form – audio, financial, and even PDFs (though they should be avoided) -- Only then do you start to talk about what data should have limited access and under what circumstances. [CLICK] <br /> NOTE: Much and probably all of this data can be stored cheaply in The Cloud – Dropbox, Amazon, etc. – and, because these services provide various levels of access, the station can seek to maximize access to its content while retaining appropriate degrees of security. [CLICK] <br /> Now about the TECHNOLOGY to make all this real [CLICK] <br />
  • Some assumptions about the TECHNOLOGY . [CLICK] <br /> The station could/should use Open Source software whenever possible; also take advantage of TechSoup offerings. Open Source applications are not built by some kid in the basement. They have been around long enough that the gov’t of German, for example, has adopted them. Should you be using Open Source software to run your servers? I don’t know what you are paying Microsoft, but many have found Linux to be reliable and it is free.Going Open Source means shifting from Microsoft to applications like LibreOffice, which is free and – with some training – easily replaces the various Office applications. But again, the station should be reaching out to our peer stations to find our their experiences with Open Source. [CLICK] <br /> That said, whatever applications are adopted should start to lean to the Default philosophy of using Cloud-based, shared applications. Note, too, that …. <br /> Increasingly, software is moving to the browser and to those applications that play well on a desktop, tablet or smartphone. <br /> As always some training will be necessary, but that’s typical today. . [CLICK] <br /> I encourage you, too, to focus on applications that emphasize ONLINE collaboration. This means… <br /> Sharing as broadly as possible, but with version control so anyone can track, say, the evolution of changes in Bylaws before a final vote <br /> This perspective also applies to event planning and team efforts. Again, there is a multitude of free or cheap applications to facilitate these efforts and activities. [CLICK] <br /> I mentioned using applications that work with multiple types and levels of hardware. Those are generally termed “Responsive Design” programs. <br /> While we talk about web sites, and the assumption often is that people are using their desktop. But we see with the KSFR board of directors, for example, that tablets and smartphones are commonly used. Therefore, all of the programming and applications need to apply “Responsive Design,” that is user interfaces that work easily on desktops OR tablets OR smartphone OR whatever is coming next. This is the norm today. . [CLICK] <br /> All of this, then requires constant research by everyone in the system and broad sharing of findings. There are a variety of ways to do this: a blog, Facebook group, digital newsletter, listserv, etc. But e-mail is probably the least efficient – i.e. difficult to search archives, difficult to tag. [CLICK] <br /> Finally, to take all this in and apply it, the station must organize WEEKLY training sessions that include staff, producers, board, volunteers. These can be in-person and hands-on, but they can also be broadcast as webinars. <br /> The Bottom Line? None of this is intuitive. Survival in this ecosystem depends on constant learning and experimentation. Yes, that means frustration and sometimes what might be perceived as failure. But it’s not failure, it’s “lesson learned.” . [CLICK] <br />
  • Let me emphasize! These <br /> Three Components: NOT separate entities <br /> They are highly integrated aspects of the total processes of the organization – the epitome of the Data In  Analysis Information Out process <br />
  • So, what can you expect from The Hub? <br /> The Hub – contains components, but they are all water in the same ocean. And their attributes are linked to users, each other, conditions of desirability and usability. These are connectors – connecting people to data, but also connecting data to data, and people to tools to data. [CLICK] <br /> Back to fundamental perspective of The Three 100s <br /> Open to as many people as possible/appropriate 100% of the time <br /> But the ultimate goal is to push opportunity and decision-making out into the participants as much as possible. [CLICK] <br /> In doing so, you are striving to eliminate hierarchy/ permissions/ limitations to data and tools [CLICK] <br /> We strive to encourage exploration – the “I wonder if….” factor <br /> So if we have this Data Hub, Who can use it and why? [Click] <br />
  • Start with efforts to bring NEWS to communities. <br /> Sure, KSFR now has some online postings of the news stories and audio. But new applications are coming along almost daily to deliver richer, more detailed and in-depth coverage. For example, few things have a 100% probability, but in Northern New Mexico there’s a very high chance that there will be forest fires. So how do you cover that in a richer manner that’s more meaningful to individual listeners? [Click] <br /> One quick way to Start is by collecting a data base of everyone on the board, staff, producers and volunteers that includes names, phone numbers, and addresses. Then use that data to Create geo-mapped data set of people all in “system” - IF THEY SO DESIRE. These folks then become available as real-time eye-witness, “Tell us what do you see?” reporters. With a map like this, they can see the fire and you can see where they are. [Click] Source: http://www.scpr.org/news/2013/09/03/39042/containment-of-yosemite-fire-at-75-percent-map-fir/ <br /> Or the station could start building a library/archive that includes <br /> Election results and your analysis of the elections so that you – and your listeners – can have some historic context. <br /> The station can and should include better analysis of things like Gov’t budgets. Put them in The Hub <br /> The station can and should have a system for Tracking FOIA/IPRA filings. Put them in The Hub <br />
  • Start with efforts to bring NEWS to communities. <br /> Sure, KSFR now has some online postings of the news stories and audio. But new applications are coming along almost daily to deliver richer, more detailed and in-depth coverage. For example, few things have a 100% probability, but in Northern New Mexico there’s a very high chance that there will be forest fires. So how do you cover that in a richer manner that’s more meaningful to individual listeners? [Click] <br /> One quick way to Start is by collecting a data base of everyone on the board, staff, producers and volunteers that includes names, phone numbers, and addresses. Then use that data to Create geo-mapped data set of people all in “system” - IF THEY SO DESIRE. These folks then become available as real-time eye-witness, “Tell us what do you see?” reporters. With a map like this, they can see the fire and you can see where they are. [Click] Source: http://www.scpr.org/news/2013/09/03/39042/containment-of-yosemite-fire-at-75-percent-map-fir/ <br /> Or the station could start building a library/archive that includes <br /> Election results and your analysis of the elections so that you – and your listeners – can have some historic context. <br /> The station can and should include better analysis of things like Gov’t budgets. Put them in The Hub <br /> The station can and should have a system for Tracking FOIA/IPRA filings. Put them in The Hub <br />
  • Start with efforts to bring NEWS to communities. <br /> Sure, KSFR now has some online postings of the news stories and audio. But new applications are coming along almost daily to deliver richer, more detailed and in-depth coverage. For example, few things have a 100% probability, but in Northern New Mexico there’s a very high chance that there will be forest fires. So how do you cover that in a richer manner that’s more meaningful to individual listeners? [Click] <br /> One quick way to Start is by collecting a data base of everyone on the board, staff, producers and volunteers that includes names, phone numbers, and addresses. Then use that data to Create geo-mapped data set of people all in “system” - IF THEY SO DESIRE. These folks then become available as real-time eye-witness, “Tell us what do you see?” reporters. With a map like this, they can see the fire and you can see where they are. [Click] Source: http://www.scpr.org/news/2013/09/03/39042/containment-of-yosemite-fire-at-75-percent-map-fir/ <br /> Or the station could start building a library/archive that includes <br /> Election results and your analysis of the elections so that you – and your listeners – can have some historic context. <br /> The station can and should include better analysis of things like Gov’t budgets. Put them in The Hub <br /> The station can and should have a system for Tracking FOIA/IPRA filings. Put them in The Hub <br />
  • Programming <br /> All-media teasers <br /> Listener polls <br /> Hyperlinked playlists <br /> Real-time listener requests <br /> Build cross-listener community/conversation, i.e. make it possible for fans to connect with each other. <br /> Multi-directional calls for $$$ support <br />
  • Data and Tools both in The Organization and from the Outside. Again, bi- and multi-directional Available 24/7 from anywhere in the world. <br /> Financial <br /> Up-to-date data on demographics <br /> Dashboard on giving progress <br /> Station peer-group analysis <br /> Various methods of giving <br /> Multiple Online methods <br /> Annuity information <br /> Stock donations <br /> Promotion of car donation <br />
  • I’ve touched on many of these already, but these kinds of data and applications are simply BASIC to any organization today. <br /> Management <br /> Broad- plus sub-set calendars <br /> Task/team management tools <br /> Event planning and analysis tools <br /> Dashboard on financial standing & revenue streams progress <br /> Station peer-group analysis <br /> Regular newsletter(s) with appropriate intra- and inter-links <br /> Now I wouldn’t blame you if you’re saying, “Yeah, Johnson is just spinning some fanciful yarns again. Stuff from The Flintstones.” ‘fraid not. I’ve been watching this evolve for 30-plus years, and as I may have said a couple weeks ago, I have to wake up literally every morning knowing that there is a reasonable probability some “DISTRUPTIVE TECHNOLOGY” for journalism rolled out while I was asleep, and I better find out what that was. That turns out not to be true daily, but it is often true at least once a week. [CLICK] <br />
  • Here are just three instances that turned up in the first half of April. I encourage you to give them a look because I believe they reflect the trends of our times in the datasphere. <br /> So let’s see if I can wrap this up. What are the larger points I’m trying to make. [CLICK] <br />
  • First, in this changing environment, survival depends on a Commitment to learning on everyone’s part – board, staff, producers, volunteers. Basically, I’m talking about maintaining LITERACY in the Digital Age. [CLICK] <br /> Secondly is the assumption that no matter how old or experienced we are, we essentially know nothing because this environment is without precedent in terms of the access to data, tools and communications channels and technology. Therefore, we have to be Constantly looking outside of our tribe – beyond our comfort zones -- for professional and intellectual resources to navigate this time and place. [CLICK] <br /> Third, we need to resist thinking about failure. Investment in digital experimentation is so low that the results are never “FAILURE,” but rather it’s “lesson learned” [CLICK] <br /> So how does a media organization pull this off? [CLICK] <br /> First, there needs to be one or more in-house champions (initially, half time) to drive the project creation of the Digital Hub. <br /> And while that is underway, the organization should be looking for a full-time Web Master who not only knows the technology but is committed to learning and teaching. Such a person need not be a journalist and certainly not a broadcaster. Those skills are picked up much faster than learning how to write good Python or SQL code. [CLICK] <br /> Second, and with good leadership, the project can start small and cheap and then ramp-up with iterations . [CLICK] <br /> So what would it Cost? Here I’m making some finger-in-the-wind guesses, but … <br /> Using Open Source software and Cloud storage? A Digital Hub could be built for an est. $5k the first year year and minimal increments later on <br /> Someone to build of the data warehouse and Homepage -- ~$7,500 to $10k. But again, a full-time webmaster should be quickly sought. Such an experienced person in Santa Fe would expect ~$60-70k plus benefits. [CLICK] <br /> But those are the easy parts of this. The technology and its implementation is challenging and difficult, but possible. The more difficult obstacle – and MAJOR investment – is changing the culture. Changing it to a “DIGITAL FIRST” environment where everyone demonstrates commitment to LEARNING/EXPERIMENTING/TEACHING AND SHARING. <br />
  • Time frame? Initially, 6-9 months, but then on-going <br /> Requires in-house champion (initially, half time) to drive the project <br /> Start small, ramp-up with iterations <br /> Cost? <br /> Using Open Source software and Cloud storage?TBD but est. $5k per year <br /> Initial build of data warehouse and Homepage~$7,500 to $10k <br /> Major investment: development and training time – staff, producers, board, volunteers <br />

Building Data-centric Media Organizations Building Data-centric Media Organizations Presentation Transcript

  • Sure, it could be done. Building Data-centric Media Organizations Tom Johnson Inst. for Analytic Journalism tom@jtjohnson.com April 2014 1
  • Foundation Assumptions • KSFR is not a radio station; it is in the business of communications • Sundown for “Mass Media” • First, “serve the communities” • The Three 100s • Data In  Analysis  Info Out and it’s all digital • Dynamic data environment requires continuous – Learning – Experimentation – Peer Teaching 2
  • Foundation Assumptions • Everyone’s job includes research, exploration/experimentation, sharing/teaching and doing it again • Think “Digital First” • All communication can/should be perceived as bi- or multi-directional • KSFR has few challenges unique to the station • If you can’t measure it, you can’t manage it 3
  • NNMRF and KSFR Data Central NNMRF and KSFR Data Central 4
  • Three Components NNMRF and KSFR Data Central NNMRF and KSFR Data Central 5
  • Three Components: Audience • Listeners • Who, What, When, Where, Why, How? • Geographic • Interests • Sponsors/underwriters • Producers • Staff • Board 6
  • Three Components: Audience • Listeners • Who, What, When, Where, Why, How? • Geographic • Interests • Sponsors/underwriters • Producers • Staff • Board • Most aspects can be described with and related to via digital data • We can capture that data (sometimes with effort) using free or cheap tools • We can efficiently communicate with all these audiences efficiently… • …to coordinate content, raise funds, solicit volunteer corps to… • promote station, talent, events, good works • Yes, dedicated, on-going training required 7
  • Three Components: ContentAudiences Tech. •“Our Town” (KSFR) data base •Programming •News •Music •Talk •Public Service •Financial •Donors • Type? •Sponsors •Grants •Events •Planning •Coverage •Training •Community communications •Board data/activities/documents Content 8
  • Three Components: ContentAudiences Tech. •“Our Town” (KSFR) data base •Programming •News •Music •Talk •Public Service •Financial •Donors • Type? •Sponsors •Grants •Events •Planning •Coverage •Training •Community communications •Board data/activities/documents Content 9
  • Three Components: ContentAudiences Tech. •“Our Town” (KSFR) data base •Programming •News •Music •Talk •Public Service •Financial •Donors • Type? •Sponsors •Grants •Events •Planning •Coverage •Training •Community communications •Board data/activities/documents Content 10
  • Three Components: ContentAudiences Tech. •Serious, regular data analysis • Sponsors and Listeners • Fine-grained analysis of sponsors (what are they getting for their money), • Donors (What, when, why, who, Where and How do they donate) • Status of our digital listeners • When do people listen? • With what types of devices? • How long to they listen, etc. • Status of your terrestrial signal Content 11
  • Three Components: ContentAudiences Tech. •The default is that everything is digital; everything is easily accessible; everything is open to the communities as needed •Only then do you start to talk about what should have limited access •Much of this data can be stored cheaply in The Cloud – Dropbox, Amazon, etc. Content 12
  • Three Components: Technology Content Audiences Technology •Open Source apps whenever possible; also TechSoup •Default storage: Cloud-based, shared applications •Everything in Responsive Design •Emphasis on collaboration tools •Constant research and broad sharing of findings •Weekly training sessions: staff, producers, board, volunteers 13
  • Three Components: NOT separate entities NNMRF and KSFR Data Central NNMRF and KSFR Data Central 14
  • Your Data Hub •The Three 100s •Strive to eliminate hierarchy/ permissions/ limitations to data and tools •Strive to encourage exploration – the “I wonder if….” factor 15 Compote of Data/People/Apps
  • Compote of Data/People/Apps The Data Hub: Who can use this? •News – Create geo-coded data set of all people in our “family” - IF THEY SO DESIRE – to be available for “What do you see?” reporting – Building library/archive • Analysis of election results • Analysis: Gov’t budgets • Tracking FOIA/IPRA filings 16
  • Compote of Data/People/Apps The Data Hub: Who can use this? •News – Create geo-coded data set of all people in our “family” - IF THEY SO DESIRE – to be available for “What do you see?” reporting – Building library/archive • Analysis of election results • Analysis: Gov’t budgets • Tracking FOIA/IPRA filings 17
  • Compote of Data/People/Apps The Data Hub: Who can use this? •News – Create geo-coded data set of all people in our “family” - IF THEY SO DESIRE – to be available for “What do you see?” reporting – Building library/archive • Analysis of election results • Analysis: Gov’t budgets • Tracking FOIA/IPRA filings 18
  • The Data Hub: Who can use this? •Programming – All-media teasers – Listener polls – Hyperlinked playlists – Real-time listener requests – Build cross-listener community/conversation – Multi-directional calls for $ $$ support 19
  • The Data Hub: Who can use this? 20 •Financial – Up-to-date data on demographics – Dashboard on giving progress – Station peer-group analysis – Various methods of giving •Multiple Online methods •Annuity information •Stock donations •Promotion of car donation •Shared budget info •Public 990s •Description of specific projects requiring financial support
  • The Data Hub: Who can use this? 21 •Management – Broad- plus sub-set calendars – Task/team management tools – Event planning and analysis tools – Dashboard on financial standing & revenue streams progress – Station peer-group analysis – Regular newsletter(s) with appropriate intra- and inter-links
  • No, I’m not making this up • Vox Takes Melding of Journalism and Technology to a New Level [NYT April 8, 2014] We need to talk: 26 awkward questions to ask news organizations abo digital • Some Ethics are Better Than Others (The decision-making process of a “traditional,” venerable journalism organization (Society of Professional Journalists) vs. the 15-year-old Online News Association) http://journoterrorist.com/2014/04/08/ethics/ • A thoroughly modern digital publisher To be a non-profit, doesn’t mean there is no revenue stream. This approach could work for an aggressive public radio station. • Journalism needs the right skills to survive 22
  • Wrap-up • Commitment to learning – board, staff, producers, volunteers • Constantly looking outside for professional and intellectual resources • It’s not failure, it’s “lesson learned” • Requires in-house champion (initially, half time) to drive the project • Start small, ramp-up with iterations • Cost? – Using Open Source software and Cloud storage? TBD but est. $5k per year – Initial build of data warehouse and Homepage ~$7,500 to $10k – Major investment: dedication to development and training time – staff, producers, board, volunteers 23
  • Wrap-up • Time frame? Initially, 6-9 months, but then on-going • Requires in-house champion (initially, half time) to drive the project • Start small, ramp-up with iterations • Cost? – Using Open Source software and Cloud storage? TBD but est. $5k per year – Initial build of data warehouse and Homepage ~$7,500 to $10k – Major investment: dedication to development and training time – staff, producers, board, volunteers 24
  • Tom Johnson Inst. for Analytic Journalism tom@jtjohnson.com April 2014 Thanks for listening. I hope this helps. 25