Be your own publisher seminar calif april 2010-session1_c_darkbkgd

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  • Start cheap and build experience. Then work up from the basics. Always first look for Open Source tools http://www.scribus.net/
  • Use Google to find cheaper prices Buy the latest version minus 1 – there usually isn’t such a big difference in new versions. And if there is something you would like in the latest and greatest, then an upgrade is relatively reasonable. Use one of these low-end programs to learn the process and vocabulary. If you really get into it, then go for the high-end like InDesign. MS Publisher Word 7 treats a document (by and large) as a continuous flow of characters, which have to be formatted 'in-line'.  Publisher, on the other hand, is 'object-oriented' - meaning that it treats a document as a collection of separate and distinct objects which can be moved, edited, or deleted completely independent of any other objects in the document.
  • Source: http://www.lulu.com/en/help/book_formatting_faq#editing_checklist 1. Consistency Subtle differences in fonts, size and spacing can make your book difficult to read and gives it a sloppy look. The best way to prevent this is to maintain your manuscript in a single file. When you make a change, make it to the entire document. This also makes it easier to number the pages. 2. Page Size When you upload your document to our book wizard, our software changes your manuscript into a PDF file of the appropriate size for your book. If your document's page size is different from your book's page size, it will have to be resized and the formatting is likely to suffer. Text can be moved, shrunk, or enlarged to meet the new size specifications. Your page count may also change which may impact your page numbering and affect the cost of your book. To avoid this problem, set your document's page size to match the page size of your book. 3. Simplicity Using the 'Select All' features of your editor (MS Word, usually) you should select a common, easy-to-read serif font such as Garamond or Times New Roman. Use this single font across all chapters. You can use a slightly different font for chapter titles and such, but in general, stick to a single font. 4. White Space Look at your cover and your content. Is there plenty of border (white space) around your text? At the start of each chapter, try pushing your text down to the halfway point on the page and center the chapter title in the middle of the now empty space on the top of the page. Be sure to give yourself at least 1" borders all around. 5. Initial Caps When you start a chapter, use initial caps (often called drop caps). That's when the first letter in a chapter is very large, spanning 2-3 lines. Editing tools such as MS Word have a Drop Caps option under the Format menu. Don't get too carried away — you don't want to lose readability. Raised and Adjacent caps are subtle variations on this very distinctive typesetting tool. 6. New Pages If you have used the Enter/Return key to begin new pages, i.e. for chapter headings, you may find that your chapters begin at the bottom of the page before them. Using actual Page Break commands (CTRL-Enter in Microsoft Word, or Insert --> Break --> Page Break if you use the menu) will eliminate this problem, and begin pages exactly where you want them. This is especially advisable for books which contain full-page images. Sandwiching the image between two page break commands will ensure it remains alone on its page. 7. Headers and Footers Start your page numbering so that page one is on your right as you look at the book. Headers and footers should be unobtrusive. Traditionally, the left headers (even pages) are the book title and right headers (odd pages) are chapter title. The first page of a chapter should have a blank header. MS Word has its most useful header and footer controls in Page Setup under the File menu. 8. Lines Per Page Too many lines per page can make a book very difficult to read. For a 6" x 9" book, less than 30 lines per page is good. 50 lines or less is good for an 8.5" x 11" book. You can set these across your document by using 1.5 line spacing using the Paragraph tools under the Format menu. 9. Paragraph Formatting It's easy to forget, since people don't do it on e-mail, but you should always indent paragraphs. That's why there's a tab key! You should also pay close attention to the spacing between paragraphs. There should be no space between paragraphs that take place in the same time and place. Don't forget to justify your paragraphs! 10. Gutter Finally, most books lose a little of the readable page to the gutter, the inside margin. Microsoft Word allows you to compensate for this in Page Setup under the File menu. Set your document for Mirror Margins, Whole Document, and make the gutter 0.1 or 0.2, depending on the thickness of your book. Get your text out of the gutter!
  • Source: http://www.lulu.com/en/help/book_formatting_faq#editing_checklist 6. New Pages If you have used the Enter/Return key to begin new pages, i.e. for chapter headings, you may find that your chapters begin at the bottom of the page before them. Using actual Page Break commands (CTRL-Enter in Microsoft Word, or Insert --> Break --> Page Break if you use the menu) will eliminate this problem, and begin pages exactly where you want them. This is especially advisable for books which contain full-page images. Sandwiching the image between two page break commands will ensure it remains alone on its page. 7. Headers and Footers Start your page numbering so that page one is on your right as you look at the book. Headers and footers should be unobtrusive. Traditionally, the left headers (even pages) are the book title and right headers (odd pages) are chapter title. The first page of a chapter should have a blank header. MS Word has its most useful header and footer controls in Page Setup under the File menu. 8. Lines Per Page Too many lines per page can make a book very difficult to read. For a 6" x 9" book, less than 30 lines per page is good. 50 lines or less is good for an 8.5" x 11" book. You can set these across your document by using 1.5 line spacing using the Paragraph tools under the Format menu. 9. Paragraph Formatting It's easy to forget, since people don't do it on e-mail, but you should always indent paragraphs. That's why there's a tab key! You should also pay close attention to the spacing between paragraphs. There should be no space between paragraphs that take place in the same time and place. Don't forget to justify your paragraphs! 10. Gutter Finally, most books lose a little of the readable page to the gutter, the inside margin. Microsoft Word allows you to compensate for this in Page Setup under the File menu. Set your document for Mirror Margins, Whole Document, and make the gutter 0.1 or 0.2, depending on the thickness of your book. Get your text out of the gutter!
  • Source: http://www.lulu.com/en/help/book_formatting_faq#editing_checklist 9. Paragraph Formatting It's easy to forget, since people don't do it on e-mail, but you should always indent paragraphs. That's why there's a tab key! You should also pay close attention to the spacing between paragraphs. There should be no space between paragraphs that take place in the same time and place. Don't forget to justify your paragraphs! 10. Gutter Finally, most books lose a little of the readable page to the gutter, the inside margin. Microsoft Word allows you to compensate for this in Page Setup under the File menu. Set your document for Mirror Margins, Whole Document, and make the gutter 0.1 or 0.2, depending on the thickness of your book. Get your text out of the gutter!
  • PDFCreator PDFCreator is a free tool to create PDF files from nearly any Windows application. PDFCreator allows you to start creating PDF files right away. No hidden Fees, no nag screens. Key Features: Create PDF s from any program that is able to print Security : Encrypt PDFs and protect them from being opened, printed etc. Send generated files via eMail Create more than just PDFs: PNG, JPG, TIFF, BMP, PCX, PS, EPS AutoSave files to folders and filenames based on Tags like Username, Computername, Date, Time etc. Merge multiple files into one PDF Easy Install : Just say what you want and everything is installed And the best: PDFCreator is free , even for commercial use ! It is Open Source and released under the Terms of the GNU General Public License.
  • NB: You can close or expand these at various levels
  • We will be using the template for the 6x9 tradebook. Note download file is a ZIP file. You will need a program like WinZIP or WinRAR or Stuff-It to “extract the files” in the package.
  • Note ZIPPED file name Note different file types
  • NB: Toggle from PPT to Word document
  • Today, the traditional point has been supplanted by the desktop publishing point (also called the PostScript point), which has been rounded to an even 72 points to the inch ( 1 point = 127 ⁄ 360 mm ≈ 0.353 mm ). In either system, there are 12 points to the pica. Typography Unit Converter: http://www.unitconversion.org/typography/postscript-point-conversion.html
  • When setting the ruler, check to see if an exact number of points can be specified for major marks. Ideally, you want major marks on the rulers to match the leading. Helpful site: http://www.tameri.com/dtp/grids.html
  • http://books.google.com/books?id=fsnBm1xQyJEC&pg=PA99&dq=magazine+design+%22column+width%22#v=onepage&q=&f=false
  • http://www.fontshop.com/fonts/category/
  • take a paragraph from your book and try out several serif fonts to see which one you like. Testing this on my computer, I determined I liked Sylfaen the best. http://i44.tinypic.com/2z8p6ys.gif the font should be easy to read while at the same time fit in well with the flavour of your book. A good way to start may be to find something like a Top Ten list, then compare the fonts in the list to find a few that match the feel of your book, and finally make test printings before making your final choice. Most of these fonts have full list of variations: Roman, italic, bold, all-caps, etc. The Serif vs. Sans Serif debate: http://www.alexpoole.info/academic/literaturereview.html#part1
  • http://www.alexpoole.info/academic/literaturereview.html
  • Source: http://www.unc.edu/~jkullama/inls181/final/serif.html

Transcript

  • 1. Take a Break Be back at 1:16
  • 2. Indie Publishing Companies
    • 0-to-minimal author fee
    • Writer’s Digest: 2009 Directory of Self-Publishing Companies Annotated list of 66 companies
    • Self-Publishing resources
    • Self-publishing vendors
  • 3. Indie Publishing Companies
    • Lulu.com No Set Up Fees Or Minimum Order!
    • Wordclay .com Very affordable (it can't get more affordable than free);publishing service provides a plethora of publishing options, get additional publishing, distribution and marketing services .
    • 48HrBooks.com Basically a production-only company; easy cost calculator; good illustration of process ; good templates ; good PDF tutorial on how to use Word template.
  • 4. Lulu: “Video on How to Publish a Book”
    • http://luluhow2video. notlong .com/
  • 5. Lulu #2 – Overview of steps Source: https://support.lulu.com/View. jsp ? procId =fdb89582c4f5da4aedfbeab98261e059&from= SearchAll _10
  • 6. Lulu Points of Advantage and Caution
    • Double check with designer on size and placing of ISBN & barcode
    • Always order a “trial” or “proof” version(s) of your book to check color, font, paper and inking, etc.
    • Double check graphics
      • DPI settings
      • For all black and white books (except comic size) , the source document and images should be in grayscale mode.
      • For full color books , the source document and/or images should be in the original colorspace . If it was created in RGB, DO NOT convert it to CMYK and vice versa.
      • If your full color book contains black and white images, set each black and white image to grayscale .
  • 7. Book Manuscript Templates
    • Whether creating a PDF or having Lulu convert a document to a PDF, source document must be properly formatted. Read following to learn about style use:
    • “ So You Want to Write a Book with MS Word” http:// daiya . mvps .org/ bookwordnoframes . htm
    • Book: “Self-publishing using OpenOffice.org 3 Writer” www.lulu.com/content/7801648
    • Open Office Writers group . Our focus is to develop a better tool for writing books and novels and also to discuss how to improve the template. http://groups. google .com/group/open-office-writers?hl=en& pli =1
  • 8. Desktop Publishing Tools Learning Curve/Complexity/Quality Price ~$0 ~$50 ~$200 ∞ Word Processing programs
    • MS Publisher
    • PagePlus
    • Open Source
    • Scribus
    • Adobe InDesign
    Latest version retail: $200+ Older version discount: $45-75
  • 9. Software Tools
    • Word Processor
      • MS Word
      • OpenOffice.org (free/shareware)
      • Pure-Mac.com for list
    • Low-cost Layout programs
      • MS Publisher (Windows)
      • PagePlus X4 (Windows)
      • Swift Publisher (Mac)
  • 10. Book Manuscript Templates
    • Go to http://www.lulu.com/publish/books/# bookSpecs
  • 11. Book Manuscript Templates Footer and Auto-page # inserted
    • Note:
    • Download and save “pure” version of template. Then open and save a copy with your unique file name .
    • No header inserted; You do it.
    • Go to “DRAW” (in Word) to view grid
    • Enter dummy text. Set to your stylebook.
    • Copy and paste your text into template.
    Ruler settings
  • 12. Editing Considerations
    • Consistency
    • Page Size Set your document's page size to match the page size of your book.
    • Simplicity in font selection
    • White Space
    • Initial Caps? When you start a chapter, use initial caps (or “drop caps”). That's when the first letter in a chapter is very large, spanning 2-3 lines.
  • 13.
    • Editing Considerations
    • New Pages Use CTRL-Enter in Microsoft Word, or Insert  Break  Page Break
    • Headers and Footers
      • Start with Page One on right.
      • The first page of a chapter should have a blank header.
      • MS Word has its most useful header and footer controls in Page Setup under the File menu.
    • Line length “Alphabet test” to set line length: type every lowercase letter from a to z. You should be able to fit 2 to 3 alphabets on your line: abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmno
  • 14. Editing Considerations
    • Lines Per Page
      • For a 6&quot; x 9&quot; book, <30 lines per page is good. 50 lines or less is good for an 8.5&quot; x 11&quot; book.
      • You can set these across your document by using 1.5 line spacing using the Paragraph tools under the Format menu.
    • Paragraph Formatting
      • Set and use tab key! You should also pay close attention to the spacing between paragraphs.
      • Justify your paragraphs!
  • 15. Editing Considerations
    • Gutter
      • Add a little space for the gutter, the inside margin. (Remember, even pages left; odd right)
      • Microsoft Word allows you to compensate for this in Page Setup under the File menu.
      • Set your document for Mirror Margins, Whole Document, and make the gutter 0.1 or 0.2, depending on the thickness of your book.
  • 16. Example of MSS page
  • 17. Example of MSS page
  • 18. Example of MSS page
  • 19. MSS to PDF
    • Lulu’s “How to Make a PDF“ http:// lulupdf . notlong .com
    • Print-to-PDF
      • Search “shareware pdf printer”
      • PDFCreator AutoSave files to folders and filenames based on Tags like Username, Computername, Date, Time, etc.
  • 20. Organizing your “project space”
    • Create a folder on flashdrive called “ self-publish_workshop ”
    • In that, create two sub-folders “ virgin_templates ” & “ camera_ready ”
    • In “ self-publish_workshop ” create sub-folder “ chpt001 ”
    • In “ chpt001 ” create sub-folders “ chpt001_text ” and “ chpt001_art ”
  • 21. Hard Drive tree should look like this
  • 22. Lulu template_download_page Source: http://www.lulu.com/publish/books/?cid=publish_portal
  • 23. Lulu_template_ZIPPED_files
  • 24. Template flowchart FOLDER= files_for_USB USB flashdrive #5 ustrade_ template .doc Click to open file… #6 FOLDER= virgin_templates Save file to…. #7 #8 - Open “ustrade_ template.doc” #9 - Save as “chpt001_ text.doc” FOLDER= chpt001
  • 25. Filing files
    • Go to flashdrive folder “ files_for_USB ”
    • Locate file “ ustrade_template.doc ”
    • Open that file and save it as “ ustrade_template.doc ” to your “ virgin_templates ” folder
    • Go to “ virgin_templates ” folder; open “ ustrade_template.doc ”
    • Save that file as “ chpt001_text ” in your “ chpt001 ” folder
  • 26. MS Word template page
    • File  SaveAs  in folder “ chpt001_te x t ” as ” chpt001_te s t ” (NB: “TE S T” not “TEXT”)
    • Shift here to Word
  • 27. Should see a Word page thusly Change folder destination
  • 28. “ Interrogating” page set-up
    • Note in menu bar “%” of document; set at 75%
    • To left of that is icon ¶ That is “hard return”
    • Go to “View” in menu bar
    • Click on “Header and Footer”
    • Note “rules” in those regions
  • 29. Beginning chapter formating
    • Place cursor in header box to left of ¶ symbol
    • Type “This is Chapter I” – DO NOT hit carriage return.
    • First significant decision for design stylebook: What is style for chapter number?
      • One or ONE or 1 or I
  • 30. Typography Basics
    • See “Printing Basics” http://fosiexpert.com/files/print-basics-090301.pdf
    • Measurement
      • English or inches
      • Millimeter and centimeter
      • Traditional points and picas
        • 12pts to the pica
        • 6 picas to the inch
        • 72pts to the inch
      • Postscript points – The traditional point has been supplanted by the desktop publishing point (also called the PostScript point), which has been rounded to an even 72 points to the inch ( 1 point = 127 ⁄ 360 mm ≈ 0.353 mm ). In either system, there are 12 points to the pica. Typography Unit Converter
  • 31. Typography Basics
    • Measurement
      • Points and picas
      • Millimeter and centimeter
      • English or inches
    • Type sizes
      • Points (printers today seem to be working as much or more with inches when doing layout)
      • Leading: 10pt/12pt
      • Em and en spaces and dashes
    • Column width and characters
  • 32. Picas Rule…
    • … especially in multi-column designs, i.e. “grid, or modular, design”
    • Set visible rulers to picas and points, esp. if using publication design program (Not easy with Word. (The leading grid is based on points, so a ruler in inches is useless.)
  • 33. Picas Rule…
    • Set 0 mark of each ruler to the upper-left corner of the page, within the margins. You do not want 0,0 to be outside of the margins, or you cannot easily set accurate grid rules. (Not easy with Word.)
    • Typically, 10pt. type on 12pt leading
    • Helpful site: http://www.tameri.com/dtp/grids.html
    • Key Point: Create your stylebook; be consistent!
  • 34. Reading the printed word
  • 35. Column-to-type-size ratio Source: White, Jan V. “ Editing By Design ,” (Edition: 3 - 2003 ) p. 101
  • 36. Main Categories of Type Faces
    • And multiple subclasses
    • Can be bought and downloaded from www.fontshop.com
  • 37. Decorative fonts
    • Decorative Type faces
      • Algerian
      • Britanic Bold
      • Broadway
      • Brush Script
      • Mistral
    • Theme of document? Legibility?
  • 38. Selecting your font(s) Serif or sans-serif? Top Ten Typefaces Used by Book Design Winners
    • Go here for examples of any font: http://www.fontshop.com/
    • Serif vs. Sans Serif debate here
  • 39. Same size type isn’t
    • The amount of leading (line spacing) depends on the height of the characters
    • The size of the type depends on the length of the line of type, i.e. column width
      • Wider line = bigger leading & type
  • 40. Adventures in reading
  • 41. Selecting Headline Fonts
    • Personal taste, but…
    • Sans serif possibly for covers, headers & footers
      • Helvetica, Arial, Verdana, Tahoma
    • Rarely used smaller than 8-9 pt.
    • Do not use reverse type smaller than 14pt (and maybe even larger)
  • 42. Selecting fonts
    • Personal taste, but…
    • Sans serif for covers, headers & footers
    • Body text: Baskerville , , Garamond , Janson, Palatino , and Times Roman
  • 43. X-height
    • X-height refers to the height of the lower case &quot;x&quot; in a typeface. It is often a better indicator of the apparent size of a typeface than point size
    Source: http://www.alexpoole.info/academic/literaturereview.html
  • 44. Your typefaces
    • Pay attention to the spacing between letters and x-height when picking a font.
    • Make sure the font you choose does not have an unusually small x-height.
    • Make conscious decisions about whether to use serif or sans-serif font.
    • For longer texts, use sans-serif fonts. For shorter texts, use serif or sans-serif fonts.
    Source: “In Search of the Perfect Font” http://www.unc.edu/~jkullama/inls181/final/serif.html Guidelines
  • 45. Take a Break Be back at 2:45