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Isocrates, Burke, and Persuasion by Division
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Isocrates, Burke, and Persuasion by Division

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A brief presentation for a course in classical rhetoric.

A brief presentation for a course in classical rhetoric.

Published in: Technology, Education

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  • Transcript

    • 1. Isocrates, Burke, and Persuasion by Division
    • 2. The story begins …
      • Praising Athenians among Athenians
      • Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Burke
    • 3. Identification and division
      • From A Rhetoric of Motives :
      • “You persuade a man only insofar as you talk his language by speech, gesture, tonality, order, image, attitude, idea, identifying your ideas with his” (55).
      • “[T]o begin with ‘identification’ is, by the same token, though roundabout, to confront the implications of division” (22).
    • 4. The Panegyricus
      • Literally praising the Athenians among the Athenians
      • A clear case of epideictic rhetoric
      • Demonstrates the type of identification Aristotle illustrates and Burke explains further
    • 5. The Antidosis
      • Isocrates presents a fictional colleague who recommends identification
      • Isocrates demonstrates understanding of persuasion by identification
    • 6. The choice of division
      • Isocrates rejects identification in favor of division
      • Continues with original strategy
      • Insults those who object to his approach
    • 7. Why division?
      • Division from past audience to identify with (and persuade) future audience?
    • 8. Persuasion by division
      • Isocrates divides himself from them to persuade them .
    • 9. The advantage of division
      • Identification with a flawed audience implies you are flawed
      • The conventional rhetorical approach, if used, would prove him wrong
    • 10. Conclusion
      • Persuasion possible through identification, but also through division
      • Truly great rhetoricians can use either, as needed

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