Accessing and Reviewing the Literature

248 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
248
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
5
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Accessing and Reviewing the Literature

  1. 1. ACCESSING ANDREVIEWING THELITERATUREJENNIFER THIESSENLIAISON LIBRARIAN, EDUCATIONJANUARY 2013 1
  2. 2. OUR AGENDA:• What is a literature review?• Finding journal articles [refresher] • Search tips • Google Scholar• Finding studies that use a particular research design• Finding out more about research design/methodology• Did we forget something? Want to know more? • Go to Sakai, the Library website or contact Jennifer 2
  3. 3. WHAT IS A LITERATUREREVIEW?•A place to make connections between what you are investigatingand what has already been investigated in your subject area•A place to engage in a type of conversation with otherresearchers in your subject area•A place to identify previous research on the topic•A place to show there is a gap in the literature which your studycan fill•A place from which to begin your own investigationRidley, D. (2008). The literature review: A step-by-step guide for students. London: Sage Publications, p. 2.
  4. 4. SIMPLY PUT…Helps you and yourreaders understand: • What you know about your topic • What other people know about your topic • What research has been done • How research was done • Where are the gaps? • Jumping off point for your by wizardhat study
  5. 5. HOW TO BEGIN?FINDING APPROPRIATE SOURCES OFINFORMATION• Know what is appropriate: – Scholarly, academic, peer-reviewed material – Material that presents empirical data/evidence to back up claims, not just opinions – Material that presents an introduction, purpose, background literature, method, procedures, findings, discussion, implica tions, conclusion• Know where to begin searching: – Book catalogues – Library databases – Education Research Complete, ERIC, Academic Search Complete, Sage Journals Online
  6. 6. WHERE TO START? BOOKS JOURNAL ARTICLES•They gather a lot of information on •Journal articles discuss oneone topic in one place. perspective.•They can provide a good overview •Each article makes a uniqueor good background information on atopic. contribution.•They often offer extensive •Articles can supplementbibliographies. information found first in•Look for encyclopedias or books.handbooks for info on key theoriesand researchers •Articles can offer more up-to- • E.g. Encyclopedia of the social date information. and cultural foundations of education •E-books
  7. 7. FINDING JOURNAL ARTICLES • Use library databases • Try Google ScholarFor finding infoabout researchmethodology
  8. 8. SEARCH TIPSUse quotation marks for phrase searching • “popular culture”; “educational leadership”Use truncation • Canad*; leaders*; pedagog*Think of synonyms • Teenager, adolescent, adolescence, teens, etc.Limit to peer-reviewed articles 9
  9. 9. SEARCH EXAMPLE
  10. 10. SEARCH TIPS…Look for subject headings to focus your search • E.g. internet and teaching:
  11. 11. • What about Google Scholar? • Another database • Find works that cite a particular article/book • See who the important authors/researchers are • Search for an article by DOI • Watch: Get Better Results with Google Scholar 12
  12. 12. SET UP LIBRARY LINKSIN SCHOLAR SETTINGS Why?
  13. 13. FINDING STUDIES THAT USE APARTICULAR RESEARCH DESIGNTry adding “literature review” • you will see examples of lit reviews, plus get an overview of some aspect of your topicOr “narrative” or “quantitative” etc.
  14. 14. RESEARCH DESIGN HELPUse Sage Research Methods Online to find background andintroductory information about a particular methodology… 16
  15. 15. …or to get a visual map of where that methodology fits in. 17
  16. 16. FOR MORE HELP…Graduate Education Research GuideResources folder in SakaiSee the Library Help pages: http://www.brocku.ca/library/help-libContact the Library Help Desk • 905-688-5550 x. 3233 or use email formContact your liaison librarian: • Jennifer Thiessen (phone, chat, email)

×