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  • Great way to present copyright law.
    Thank you, I look forward to sharing your slide show with my J1 students.

    <b>[Comment posted from</b> http://texasjteachers.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=55:law-and-ethics&catid=50:law-and-ethics&Itemid=73]
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  • [Note to Presenter: The notes that follow work as either a presentation script or as preparatory material for the presenter. If you’re reading the notes as a script and allow for moderate discussion, the full presentation should last between 40 and 60 minutes.]

Ppcopyrightlaw Presentation Transcript

  • 1. © Copyright 2006 Student Press Law Center
  • 2. Copyright Law for High School Student Journalists An introduction to common copyright law issues and resources for high school student journalists and their advisers This presentation was made possible by a generous grant from: © Copyright 2006 Student Press Law Center
  • 3. Student Press Law Center Web site: www.splc.org Phone: (703) 807-1904 Monday - Friday 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. Eastern Time Provides free legal help and information on media law issues to student journalists and their advisers Between Memorial Day and Labor Day the SPLC closes at 4:30 p.m. on Fridays
  • 4. Copyright Infringement Using someone else’s original work without obtaining the copyright owner’s permission
  • 5. What is copyright? © ?
  • 6. Copyright protects property
  • 7. Rights protected by a copyright
    • Reproduction
    • Adaptation
    • Distribution
    • Public performance
    • Public display
  • 8. Rights protected by a copyright
    • Reproduction
    • Adaptation
    • Distribution
    • Public performance
    • Public display
    The copyright of the cover art from Bruce Springsteen’s 1984 Born in the USA album is just one of several associated with the musical work
  • 9. Purpose of copyright
    • Recognized in U.S. Constitution
      • Encourage progress through advancement of
      • arts & sciences
  • 10. Purpose of copyright
    • Recognized in U.S. Constitution
      • Encourage progress through advancement of
      • arts & sciences
        • Reward creative efforts
  • 11. Purpose of copyright
    • Recognized in U.S. Constitution
      • Encourage progress through advancement of
      • arts & sciences
        • Reward creative efforts
        • Promote societal knowledge
  • 12. Intellectual Property
    • Copyright
    • Patent
    • Trademark
    • Plagiarism
  • 13. Copyright v. Patent Protection
  • 14. Copyright v. Trademark A few examples of some well-known trademarks and service marks
  • 15. Copyright v. Trademark The Test: Is there a likelihood of consumer confusion?
  • 16. Copyright v. Plagiarism
    • Posing as the creator of a work that is not your own
    • Not a legal term
    • Academic crime with variable definitions
  • 17. What can be copyrighted?
    • Requirement 1: Originality
    • Requirement 2: Minimal Creativity
    • Requirement 3: Fixation
  • 18. Copyright law protects material on the Internet!
  • 19. Copyright can protect:
    • Photos
    • Stories
    • Illustrations
    • Cartoons
    • Advertisements
    • …even Wallpaper
  • 20. Copyright does not prohibit use of: Ideas
  • 21. Copyright does not prohibit use of: Facts
  • 22. Copyright does not prohibit use of:
    • Most federal government records
    • Some state and local government records
  • 23. New York, NY, September 25, 2001 — A rescue worker overlooks the rubble from the collapsed World Trade Center. Photo by Mike Rieger/ FEMA News Photo (www.photolibrary.fema.gov)
  • 24. Copyright does not prohibit use of:
    • Odds and Ends
      • Titles
      • Slogans
      • Short phrases
      • Names
      • Familiar symbols
      • Lists of ingredients
      • Basic instructions
      • Simple blank forms
  • 25. days of our lives The sound of music Just do it! Oops, I did it again. t i t a n i c 1 c. sugar 1 c. butter 1 egg 3 c. flour Mix together. Bake on cookie sheet at 325º
  • 26. Copyright does not prohibit use of:
    • Works whose copyright has expired
  • 27.  
  • 28. How long does a copyright last? www.splc.org/copyrightcalculator
  • 29. How is a work copyrighted?
    • Copyright exists from the moment a work is created
  • 30. Copyright MythBuster #1 A work that does not have a copyright notice (e.g., © Copyright 2006 Student Press Law Center) is not protected by copyright and can be used freely. False : Since 1989, a copyright notice has been optional and its inclusion or omission on a work does not affect the validity of a copyright.
  • 31. Copyright MythBuster #2 A work must be registered with the U.S. Copyright Office to receive copyright protection. False: Formal registration of a copyright is not required.
  • 32. What about registration?
    • Form
    • Fee
    • Submit copies
    • Some added benefits
    www.copyright.gov
  • 33. Who owns a copyright?
    • “ Work for hire” doctrine
      • Work owned by employer
      • Formal employer/employee relationship required
    • Most high school student journalists are likely “independent contractors” who own the works they create
    • Importance of a copyright agreement
  • 34. The General Rule If you didn’t create it and/or you don’t own the copyright to it, you must get permission to use it
  • 35. Copyright MythBuster #3 Including a credit line on a copyrighted work is enough to avoid copyright problems. False: The law requires actual permission from the copyright owner, not just attribution.
  • 36. Amidst a throng of photographers, the Queen Mother joins Prince Charles and Princess Diana for the London world premier of the film 84 Charing Cross Road Photo Courtesy of Famous People Magazine People in the News: The Year in Review The High Schoolian 1987 Absent actual permission, a credit line will not protect against claims of copyright infringement
  • 37. Obtaining copyright permission Copyright Notice Publisher’s Contact Information
  • 38. Obtaining copyright permission
    • Written copyright permission request usually required and should include:
      • Contact information
      • Expected publication date
      • Number of copies you intend to produce
      • Publication price (if any)
      • Non-profit statement (if applicable)
      • Clear description of intended use
      • Response deadline
    • Written permission response preferred
  • 39. Purchasing copyright licenses
  • 40. The General Rule If you didn’t create it and/or you don’t own the copyright to it, you must get permission to use it Except…
  • 41. Fair Use: An Exception to the Rule
  • 42. Fair Use: An Exception to the Rule
    • Using a limited amount of a copyright-protected work for news, educational or informational purposes without consent may be permissible as a “fair use”
  • 43. Fair Use: An Exception to the Rule
    • Using a limited amount of a copyright-protected work for news, educational or informational purposes without consent may be permissible as a “fair use”
    • Not every use by a student media organization is a fair use
  • 44. Fair Use: The Four Factors
    • What is the purpose and character of the use?
  • 45. Fair Use: The Four Factors
    • What is the purpose and character of the use?
    • What is the nature of the copyright-protected work?
  • 46. Fair Use: The Four Factors
    • What is the purpose and character of the use?
    • What is the nature of the copyright-protected work?
    • How much of the original work is used?
  • 47. Copyright MythBuster #4 You can safely use up to 250 words of text or up to 30 seconds of a song or movie without violating copyright law. False: Copyright law does not recognize any absolute word/time allowances or other “safe harbors” for use of copyright-protected works.
  • 48. Fair Use: The Four Factors
    • What is the purpose and character of the use?
    • What is the nature of the copyright-protected work?
    • How much of the original work is used?
    • What is the effect of the use on the potential market value of the original work?
  • 49. Common fair use examples
  • 50. Common fair use examples
  • 51. Common fair use examples
  • 52. Common fair use examples
  • 53. Copyright and Parody • “ Conjure Up” Test • Parody of original must be obvious • Minimal impact on market value of original • Creativity counts
  • 54. Penalties for Copyright Infringement
    • Actual damages
    • Statutory damages
    • Injunctive relief
  • 55. U.S. Copyright Office Web site: www.copyright.gov
  • 56. Other Student Media Law Resources
    • Student media newsroom
    • “ Must Have” resource
  • 57. Other Student Media Law Resources Student media newsroom “Helpful” resources
  • 58. Seek help when you need it! Student Press Law Center www.splc.org (703) 807-1904 Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Eastern Time Between Memorial Day and Labor Day the SPLC closes at 4:30 p.m. on Fridays
  • 59. Copyright Law for High School Student Journalists was written and produced by the Student Press Law Center with the support of a generous grant from the Newspaper Association of America Foundation. You can help the Student Press Law Center create new generations of Americans who will understand and defend the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution and the values it embodies through your tax-deductible contribution. Go to www.splc.org/give for details. Permission to use and display this classroom presentation for noncommercial, educational purposes is hereby granted. Any commercial use, reproduction or editing of this presentation is prohibited without the express written permission of the Student Press Law Center. While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in Copyright Law for High School Student Journalists it provides general guidance and information only . It is neither intended nor represented as a substitute for obtaining case-specific advice from a licensed and experienced media law attorney in your state. A special thanks to Dineen Pashoukos Wasylik for her contributions to this project. © 2006 Student Press Law Center. All rights reserved.