Writing
For Gifted Students
★ Depth and complexity
★ Content imperatives

★ Universal themes
Definition of Depth
“…exploring the discipline by
going past facts and
concepts into generalizations,
principles, theories,...
“appropriately
differentiated
  classroom
material, activities,
projects, products,
 homework, and
   assessments
complex
enough
abstract
enough
open-ended
  enough
multifaceted
  enough
stretch in
 knowledge,
thinking, and
production.”
        Carol Ann Tomlinson
http://www.flickr.com/photos/geishaboy500/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/geishaboy500/
Principles/Theories/Laws
    ★Plot Structure.
    ★Themes.

    ★Character Archetypes.

    ★Types of Conflict.
Think like an
author.
Think like an
author.
Analyzing Literature



Creating Literature
Analyzing Literature



Creating Literature
Initial Lesson
   Establishing a
Deductive Lesson
Structure increases
creativity.
Structure increases
creativity.
Structure increases
creativity.
Structure increases
creativity.
Structure increases
creativity.
Structure increases
creativity.
Structure increases
creativity.
Structure increases
creativity.
Music

Film
                            Visual Art




                Structure
              increases
              cre...
Music

Film
                            Visual Art




                Structure
              increases
              cre...
Groups
Investigate the
Lesson II
Plot Structure
     Pattern that frames
     the dramatic structure!
Definition                Characteristics


  naosdasdnzmxn            naosdasdnzmxn
  asasdasd                 asasdasd
  ...
Structure increases creativity.
ACT I
Exposition
Definition
In the exposition, the reader meets
the protagonist and sees life
before the conflict starts
Essential Characteristics
★Introduces protagonist’s
 character traits
★Introduces general setting

★Shows life before confl...
Examples
Examples
Non-Examples
★The real conflict does not begin in
 the exposition.
★Nemo’s capture and Marlin’s

 attempts to find him are n...
Non-Examples
★The real conflict does not begin in
 the exposition.
★Nemo’s capture and Marlin’s

 attempts to find him are n...
Judge how the author uses
the exposition to show the
characters’ traits.
Judge how the author uses
the exposition to show the
characters’ traits.

What actions, thoughts &
dialog in the expositio...
ACT II
Rising Action
Definition
The series of adventures the
characters go, moving towards the
climax. The action gets
increasingly tense as the...
Essential Characteristics
★Several mini-adventures within
 the main plot
★Longest act of the story

★Builds tension, excit...
Examples




Inciting Incident
Examples




Inciting Incident
Judge how the author uses
the rising action to show the
characters’ traits.
Judge how the author uses
the rising action to show the
characters’ traits.

What actions, thoughts &
dialog in the exposi...
ACT III
 Climax
Definition
The climax is the peak of the
action. It could be a huge battle or
an exciting action scene.
Essential Characteristics
★Most intense, exciting moment of
 the story.
★All storylines come together.

★Uses character’s ...
Judge how the author uses
the climax to show how
characters have changed.
Judge how the author uses
the climax to show how
characters have changed.

How did the rising action
equip the characters ...
ACT IV
Falling Action
Definition
The falling action is a short but vital
part of the story that resolves the
climax.
Essential Characteristics
★Shows the outcome of the climax
★Tells the reader the status of the

 main characters
Examples
Examples
ACT V
Dénouemont
Definition
The dénouement reveals how the
characters have “changed over
time.”
Essential Characteristics
★The characters are back in a
 similar setting as the exposition
★The protagonist’s actions show...
Examples
Examples
Non-Examples
★“And they lived happily ever
 after.”
★“And he never made the same

 mistake again.”
Non-Examples
★“And they lived happily ever
 after.”
★“And he never made the same

 mistake again.”
Judge how the author uses
the dénouement to contrast
with the exposition.
Judge how the author uses
the dénouement to contrast
with the exposition.

What actions, thoughts &
dialog in the dénoueme...
Lesson III

ThemesBig ideas that frame
      the story’s meaning.
Do you know that story where the
character goes from good to bad?
Structure increases creativity.
Fall From
 Grace
Definition
A character begins a “good”
person but becomes “bad” or
“falls from grace.” The character
then achieves redempti...
Essential Characteristics
★The protagonist begins heroically.
★A selfish act destroys the

 protagonist’s reputation.
★The ...
Examples
Examples
The Quest
Definition
The protagonist is on a mission to
find a place, a person, or an item.
During the journey, the main
character exp...
Essential Characteristics
★Character begins humbly
★Character acquires comrades

★Quest changes the character

★The quest ...
Examples
Examples
Coming Of Age
Definition
A character grows up and loses
their childish ways. This may mean
taking on new responsibilities or
realizing th...
Essential Characteristics
★Character is young
★Character clashes with authority

 (teacher, parent, older sibling)
★Charac...
Examples
Examples
Alienation
Definition
Protagonist is alone and out of
place. During this time, the
character learns about himself and
grows. He may al...
Essential Characteristics
★Strange setting and characters.
★Character learns these

 surroundings.
★The other characters m...
Examples
Examples
It’s A
The Lion King   The Giver
                            Wonderful Life


  The Little                  To Kill A
    ...
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lincolnian/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mundolaura/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/frielp/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/villes/
Lesson IV

Archetypes
     The beginning of
     interesting characters.
Lesson IV

Archetypes
     The beginning of
     interesting characters.
Inductive Lesson
An archetype is an original
model of a person, ideal
example, or a prototype upon
which others are copied,
patterned, or e...
An archetype is an original
model of a person, ideal
example, or a prototype upon
which others are copied,
patterned, or e...
An archetype is an original
model of a person, ideal
example, or a prototype upon
which others are copied,
patterned, or e...
Structure increases creativity.
Analyze Within An Archetype
Analyze Within An Archetype
Definition: Hero
The hero is a protagonist who
begins as a humble, non-heroic
protagonist.
Examples
★Luke Skywalker
★Neo, from The Matrix

★Jake Sully, from Avatar

★Frodo Baggins

★King Arthur
Examples
★Luke Skywalker
★Neo, from The Matrix

★Jake Sully, from Avatar

★Frodo Baggins

★King Arthur
Definition: Mentor
The mentor guides the hero,
teaching them skills and character
traits, perhaps gifting them an
important...
Essential Characteristics
★Experienced protagonist's
 conflict
★Older than protagonist

★Tests & challenges protagonist

★G...
Examples
★Obi-Wan Kenobi, Star Wars
★Charles Xavier, X-Men

★Merlin

★Glinda
Examples
★Obi-Wan Kenobi, Star Wars
★Charles Xavier, X-Men

★Merlin

★Glinda
Character    Unique
Archetype   Character
Base Off Existing Characters
Your Hero
Base Off Existing Characters
Your Hero
Character Growth
Character Growth
Exposition   Dénouemont
What actions, thoughts, and
    dialog show this growth?
Exposition         Dénouemont
How does this character
contribute to the theme?
Guide To
Developing A
Unique
Character
Lesson V

Conflict
     The cause of the
     protagonist’s change.
Types Of Conflict
★ Character vs Character
★ Character vs Nature
★ Character vs Society
★ Character vs Self
Conflict causes the character
to change...
Analyzing Literature



Creating Literature
Analyzing Literature



Creating Literature
Author
Theme
Character       Setting

   Plot
                Conflict

               Author
Theme
Character       Setting

   Plot
                Conflict

               Author
Think like an author.
Identify the theme of
this story.
Think like an author.
Identify the theme of
this story.
Identify three events in
the rising action that
support this theme.
Identify three events in
the rising action that
support this theme.
Evaluate how the
character has changed
from the exposition to
the dénouement. How
does this change
support the theme?
Evaluate how the
character has changed
from the exposition to
the dénouement. How
does this change
support the theme?
In what way does this
character parallel an
archetype? In what
ways is the character
unique? How does this
support the the...
In what way does this
character parallel an
archetype? In what
ways is the character
unique? How does this
support the the...
Judge your evidence
and pick the three that
most clearly support
the theme.
Elaborate on each
piece of evidence,
explaining how it
demonstrates the
theme.
Body ¶ 1



Body ¶ 2



Body ¶ 3
Body ¶ 1
One way the author demonstrates the message of
‘letting go’ is through Marlin’s change from the
exposition to the...
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Writing: Structure Increases Creativity
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Writing: Structure Increases Creativity

1,667 views

Published on

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,667
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
5
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
44
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • say hi. ask who’s here.
  • who knows about these things?
  • depth, according to TX, involves going past facts into big ideas (laws, generalizations), in this writing unit we’re going to approach writing using big ideas and authentic rules of gret writing
  • For gifted learners, an appropriately differentiated classroom will
  • material, activities, projects or products, homework, and assessments
  • that are complex enough, abstract enough, open-ended enough, and multifaceted enough



  • to cause gifted students to stretch in knowledge, thinking, and production. - want to move students from novice to expert understanding.
  • equip students with sophisticated tools to analyze & create writing. use authentic tools of an author. beyond ‘beginning’ middle end, id setting, good guy bad guy...
  • equip students with sophisticated tools to analyze & create writing. use authentic tools of an author. beyond ‘beginning’ middle end, id setting, good guy bad guy...
  • equip students with sophisticated tools to analyze & create writing. use authentic tools of an author. beyond ‘beginning’ middle end, id setting, good guy bad guy...
  • go beyond textbook instruction: beg, mid, end. id setting. id main character... etc.
  • will benefit analysis and creative writing...
  • interplay between analysis creation of literature; very flexible in our thinking. can go both ways. analy use of patterns in ‘great’ writing to give students scaffold for creating great writing.
  • interplay between analysis creation of literature; very flexible in our thinking. can go both ways. analy use of patterns in ‘great’ writing to give students scaffold for creating great writing.
  • unit based on depth/complexity, big ideas for writing. several lessons. lesson 1 is purely about establishing a big idea for the entire unit.setting up ‘abstract, multi-faceted idea’
  • deductive lesson - starting with a big idea and developing examples to support the thesis. “
  • unit focused “structure increases creativity” - hey guys, here’s an interesting idea that seems like a paradox. But we’ll see that creative people establish rules and then use them to increase their creativity
  • brainstorm examples (unorganized graphic org) - get kids in on this too!
  • brainstorm examples (unorganized graphic org) - get kids in on this too!
  • brainstorm examples (unorganized graphic org) - get kids in on this too!
  • brainstorm examples (unorganized graphic org) - get kids in on this too!
  • brainstorm examples (unorganized graphic org) - get kids in on this too!
  • brainstorm examples (unorganized graphic org) - get kids in on this too!
  • brainstorm examples (unorganized graphic org) - get kids in on this too!
  • brainstorm examples (unorganized graphic org) - get kids in on this too!
  • use frame to categorize the unorganized - this idea is true across disciplines
  • use frame to categorize the unorganized - this idea is true across disciplines
  • use frame to categorize the unorganized - this idea is true across disciplines
  • use frame to categorize the unorganized - this idea is true across disciplines
  • use frame to categorize the unorganized - this idea is true across disciplines
  • use frame to categorize the unorganized - this idea is true across disciplines
  • use frame to categorize the unorganized - this idea is true across disciplines
  • use frame to categorize the unorganized - this idea is true across disciplines
  • use frame to categorize the unorganized - this idea is true across disciplines
  • group work - supporting my examples of the big idea
  • work in the groups - pass out art, etc
  • PLOT: first “big idea/pattern” in writing is that plots have a common pattern. Want to push students beyond “beginning middle end” to sophisticated language and tools of discipline.
  • to teach this we’ll use a frayer model of concept attainment: using d/c and c/i icons. explain models.
  • History - analyzing plots for patterns goes way back to 300 BC with Aristotle’s Poetics. Found a STRUCTURE in this creative art form. Keeps us from making a confusing plot.
  • begin by defining first act, to teach this, using Frayer model with d/c/c/i and a modern classic Finding Nemo. Encourage Think Like An Author. This stuff is real. Constantly asking students for parallel examples... engage their background. EMPH lang of disc




  • safety first
  • marlin is overprotective, annoys nemo
  • not funny!
  • angry when nemo is in danger

  • Go beyond ‘identify exposition.’ - Judge author’s use of expositoin. What character traits did the author show us? What actions, thoughts, dialog helped us to see these traits? How does the setting affect this?
  • Go beyond ‘identify exposition.’ - Judge author’s use of expositoin. What character traits did the author show us? What actions, thoughts, dialog helped us to see these traits? How does the setting affect this?












  • No ‘identify rising action.’ - Judge author’s use. How are the characters changing? What actions, thoughts, dialog helped us to see these traits?
    Setting ->-> to change?
  • No ‘identify rising action.’ - Judge author’s use. How are the characters changing? What actions, thoughts, dialog helped us to see these traits?
    Setting ->-> to change?
  • emphasize lang o’ disc


  • niles comes in, plots intersct
  • madness in dent office
  • marlin must trust nemo!
  • Past ‘identify climax.’ - Judge author’s use. How did the rising action equip characters to deal with climax? Setting’s imporance?
  • Past ‘identify climax.’ - Judge author’s use. How did the rising action equip characters to deal with climax? Setting’s imporance?






  • my favorite! french word :)
  • my favorite!

  • marlin races nemo
  • funny joke
  • friends from rising action are shown.

  • other characters’ fates are revealed
  • push our students beyond the novice ending. SHOW us the changes.
  • Judge author’s use. How did the denoumont parallel the exposition? What differences were there? How did the author show the changes?
  • Judge author’s use. How did the denoumont parallel the exposition? What differences were there? How did the author show the changes?
  • Let’s write a brief story that follows this structure.

  • Puzzlement allow brainstorming - did you notice that there are *many* stories where a character goes from good to bad
  • When we have a theme, it acts as a skeleton to which we add creative details. again emphasize that these are authentic tools by analyzing familiar, great, stories.
  • Emphasize use of actual language.





























  • Use the setting of one of these images and the plot from last lesson to develop a coof story with one of our themes



  • Use the setting of one of these images and the plot from last lesson to develop a coof story with one of our themes

  • INductive thinking goes from small to big. I notice you are all wearing hats, it must be popular to wear hats in TX. with DEductive, I would tell the rule and then you would support it.
  • Generate list of interesting examples of characters (sort of a setup, normally we’d have kids generate the list but I want nice archetypes.) Go through lesson. Group two. Group more. Group all. Then Explain groups. Finally label.
  • use an inductive model (upside down big idea) to analyze these characters. How are they similar? what ‘s pattern? label: they are the rogues/anti-heros


  • Using an archetype gives a writer structure to add interesting details.
  • compare and contrast to show that characters can share origin but differ in details
  • compare and contrast to show that characters can share origin but differ in details
  • compare and contrast to show that characters can share origin but differ in details





  • Students will use their understnading of archetypes to develop their own chars, 1ST have them select an archetype, then ...
  • Students will use their understnading of archetypes to develop their own chars, 1ST have them select an archetype, then ...
  • Students will use their understnading of archetypes to develop their own chars, 1ST have them select an archetype, then ...
  • Students will use their understnading of archetypes to develop their own chars, 1ST have them select an archetype, then ...
  • Students will use their understnading of archetypes to develop their own chars, 1ST have them select an archetype, then ...
  • continue scaffold to move from archetype to unique, interesting character
  • tie back to the plot structure.
  • tie back to the plot structure.
  • tie back to the plot structure.
  • tie back to the plot structure.
  • key to define actions, etc, instead of just explaining the change. SHOW us, don’t TELL us.
  • tie back into theme
  • complete worksheet based on Char Arch.
  • conflict
  • villain could be enemy or nature? foil?



  • Sophisticated language and topics come together to arm students for a response to literature.
  • Sophisticated language and topics come together to arm students for a response to literature.
  • Sophisticated language and topics come together to arm students for a response to literature.
  • Sophisticated language and topics come together to arm students for a response to literature.
  • Sophisticated language and topics come together to arm students for a response to literature.
  • Sophisticated language and topics come together to arm students for a response to literature.
  • Sophisticated language and topics come together to arm students for a response to literature.












  • Writing: Structure Increases Creativity

    1. 1. Writing For Gifted Students
    2. 2. ★ Depth and complexity ★ Content imperatives ★ Universal themes
    3. 3. Definition of Depth “…exploring the discipline by going past facts and concepts into generalizations, principles, theories, laws…” Texas State Plan For The Education Of Gifted Students
    4. 4. “appropriately differentiated classroom
    5. 5. material, activities, projects, products, homework, and assessments
    6. 6. complex enough
    7. 7. abstract enough
    8. 8. open-ended enough
    9. 9. multifaceted enough
    10. 10. stretch in knowledge, thinking, and production.” Carol Ann Tomlinson
    11. 11. http://www.flickr.com/photos/geishaboy500/
    12. 12. http://www.flickr.com/photos/geishaboy500/
    13. 13. Principles/Theories/Laws ★Plot Structure. ★Themes. ★Character Archetypes. ★Types of Conflict.
    14. 14. Think like an author.
    15. 15. Think like an author.
    16. 16. Analyzing Literature Creating Literature
    17. 17. Analyzing Literature Creating Literature
    18. 18. Initial Lesson Establishing a
    19. 19. Deductive Lesson
    20. 20. Structure increases creativity.
    21. 21. Structure increases creativity.
    22. 22. Structure increases creativity.
    23. 23. Structure increases creativity.
    24. 24. Structure increases creativity.
    25. 25. Structure increases creativity.
    26. 26. Structure increases creativity.
    27. 27. Structure increases creativity.
    28. 28. Music Film Visual Art Structure increases creativity. Technology
    29. 29. Music Film Visual Art Structure increases creativity. Technology
    30. 30. Groups Investigate the
    31. 31. Lesson II Plot Structure Pattern that frames the dramatic structure!
    32. 32. Definition Characteristics naosdasdnzmxn naosdasdnzmxn asasdasd asasdasd dsdfsdfs dsdfsdfs Exposition naosdasdnzmxn naosdasdnzmxn asasdasd asasdasd dsdfsdfs dsdfsdfs Examples Non-Examples
    33. 33. Structure increases creativity.
    34. 34. ACT I Exposition
    35. 35. Definition In the exposition, the reader meets the protagonist and sees life before the conflict starts
    36. 36. Essential Characteristics ★Introduces protagonist’s character traits ★Introduces general setting ★Shows life before conflict.
    37. 37. Examples
    38. 38. Examples
    39. 39. Non-Examples ★The real conflict does not begin in the exposition. ★Nemo’s capture and Marlin’s attempts to find him are not part of the exposition.
    40. 40. Non-Examples ★The real conflict does not begin in the exposition. ★Nemo’s capture and Marlin’s attempts to find him are not part of the exposition.
    41. 41. Judge how the author uses the exposition to show the characters’ traits.
    42. 42. Judge how the author uses the exposition to show the characters’ traits. What actions, thoughts & dialog in the exposition contribute to character traits?
    43. 43. ACT II Rising Action
    44. 44. Definition The series of adventures the characters go, moving towards the climax. The action gets increasingly tense as the climax approaches. This action begins with an event known as the “inciting incident.”
    45. 45. Essential Characteristics ★Several mini-adventures within the main plot ★Longest act of the story ★Builds tension, excitement, and suspense over time
    46. 46. Examples Inciting Incident
    47. 47. Examples Inciting Incident
    48. 48. Judge how the author uses the rising action to show the characters’ traits.
    49. 49. Judge how the author uses the rising action to show the characters’ traits. What actions, thoughts & dialog in the exposition show a character changing?
    50. 50. ACT III Climax
    51. 51. Definition The climax is the peak of the action. It could be a huge battle or an exciting action scene.
    52. 52. Essential Characteristics ★Most intense, exciting moment of the story. ★All storylines come together. ★Uses character’s changes to solve conflict.
    53. 53. Judge how the author uses the climax to show how characters have changed.
    54. 54. Judge how the author uses the climax to show how characters have changed. How did the rising action equip the characters to handle the climax?
    55. 55. ACT IV Falling Action
    56. 56. Definition The falling action is a short but vital part of the story that resolves the climax.
    57. 57. Essential Characteristics ★Shows the outcome of the climax ★Tells the reader the status of the main characters
    58. 58. Examples
    59. 59. Examples
    60. 60. ACT V Dénouemont
    61. 61. Definition The dénouement reveals how the characters have “changed over time.”
    62. 62. Essential Characteristics ★The characters are back in a similar setting as the exposition ★The protagonist’s actions show the effect of the story’s conflict. ★Shows how the characters have changed.
    63. 63. Examples
    64. 64. Examples
    65. 65. Non-Examples ★“And they lived happily ever after.” ★“And he never made the same mistake again.”
    66. 66. Non-Examples ★“And they lived happily ever after.” ★“And he never made the same mistake again.”
    67. 67. Judge how the author uses the dénouement to contrast with the exposition.
    68. 68. Judge how the author uses the dénouement to contrast with the exposition. What actions, thoughts & dialog in the dénouement contribute to the characters’ change over time?
    69. 69. Lesson III ThemesBig ideas that frame the story’s meaning.
    70. 70. Do you know that story where the character goes from good to bad?
    71. 71. Structure increases creativity.
    72. 72. Fall From Grace
    73. 73. Definition A character begins a “good” person but becomes “bad” or “falls from grace.” The character then achieves redemption and becomes “good” again.
    74. 74. Essential Characteristics ★The protagonist begins heroically. ★A selfish act destroys the protagonist’s reputation. ★The protagonist returns to the hero status through selfless acts.
    75. 75. Examples
    76. 76. Examples
    77. 77. The Quest
    78. 78. Definition The protagonist is on a mission to find a place, a person, or an item. During the journey, the main character experiences a change over time.
    79. 79. Essential Characteristics ★Character begins humbly ★Character acquires comrades ★Quest changes the character ★The quest is less important than the final growth
    80. 80. Examples
    81. 81. Examples
    82. 82. Coming Of Age
    83. 83. Definition A character grows up and loses their childish ways. This may mean taking on new responsibilities or realizing that something isn’t important.
    84. 84. Essential Characteristics ★Character is young ★Character clashes with authority (teacher, parent, older sibling) ★Character goes through a conflict which changes their point of view ★Character understands the point of view of the authority
    85. 85. Examples
    86. 86. Examples
    87. 87. Alienation
    88. 88. Definition Protagonist is alone and out of place. During this time, the character learns about himself and grows. He may also help those around him grow as well.
    89. 89. Essential Characteristics ★Strange setting and characters. ★Character learns these surroundings. ★The other characters may learn from the main character.
    90. 90. Examples
    91. 91. Examples
    92. 92. It’s A The Lion King The Giver Wonderful Life The Little To Kill A Spiderman Mermaid Mockingbird Island Of The Up Wall•E Blue Dolphins
    93. 93. http://www.flickr.com/photos/lincolnian/
    94. 94. http://www.flickr.com/photos/mundolaura/
    95. 95. http://www.flickr.com/photos/frielp/
    96. 96. http://www.flickr.com/photos/villes/
    97. 97. Lesson IV Archetypes The beginning of interesting characters.
    98. 98. Lesson IV Archetypes The beginning of interesting characters.
    99. 99. Inductive Lesson
    100. 100. An archetype is an original model of a person, ideal example, or a prototype upon which others are copied, patterned, or emulated; en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archetype
    101. 101. An archetype is an original model of a person, ideal example, or a prototype upon which others are copied, patterned, or emulated; en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archetype
    102. 102. An archetype is an original model of a person, ideal example, or a prototype upon which others are copied, patterned, or emulated; en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archetype
    103. 103. Structure increases creativity.
    104. 104. Analyze Within An Archetype
    105. 105. Analyze Within An Archetype
    106. 106. Definition: Hero The hero is a protagonist who begins as a humble, non-heroic protagonist.
    107. 107. Examples ★Luke Skywalker ★Neo, from The Matrix ★Jake Sully, from Avatar ★Frodo Baggins ★King Arthur
    108. 108. Examples ★Luke Skywalker ★Neo, from The Matrix ★Jake Sully, from Avatar ★Frodo Baggins ★King Arthur
    109. 109. Definition: Mentor The mentor guides the hero, teaching them skills and character traits, perhaps gifting them an important item
    110. 110. Essential Characteristics ★Experienced protagonist's conflict ★Older than protagonist ★Tests & challenges protagonist ★Gives protagonist helpful gifts
    111. 111. Examples ★Obi-Wan Kenobi, Star Wars ★Charles Xavier, X-Men ★Merlin ★Glinda
    112. 112. Examples ★Obi-Wan Kenobi, Star Wars ★Charles Xavier, X-Men ★Merlin ★Glinda
    113. 113. Character Unique Archetype Character
    114. 114. Base Off Existing Characters Your Hero
    115. 115. Base Off Existing Characters Your Hero
    116. 116. Character Growth
    117. 117. Character Growth Exposition Dénouemont
    118. 118. What actions, thoughts, and dialog show this growth? Exposition Dénouemont
    119. 119. How does this character contribute to the theme?
    120. 120. Guide To Developing A Unique Character
    121. 121. Lesson V Conflict The cause of the protagonist’s change.
    122. 122. Types Of Conflict ★ Character vs Character ★ Character vs Nature ★ Character vs Society ★ Character vs Self
    123. 123. Conflict causes the character to change...
    124. 124. Analyzing Literature Creating Literature
    125. 125. Analyzing Literature Creating Literature
    126. 126. Author
    127. 127. Theme Character Setting Plot Conflict Author
    128. 128. Theme Character Setting Plot Conflict Author
    129. 129. Think like an author. Identify the theme of this story.
    130. 130. Think like an author. Identify the theme of this story.
    131. 131. Identify three events in the rising action that support this theme.
    132. 132. Identify three events in the rising action that support this theme.
    133. 133. Evaluate how the character has changed from the exposition to the dénouement. How does this change support the theme?
    134. 134. Evaluate how the character has changed from the exposition to the dénouement. How does this change support the theme?
    135. 135. In what way does this character parallel an archetype? In what ways is the character unique? How does this support the theme?
    136. 136. In what way does this character parallel an archetype? In what ways is the character unique? How does this support the theme?
    137. 137. Judge your evidence and pick the three that most clearly support the theme.
    138. 138. Elaborate on each piece of evidence, explaining how it demonstrates the theme.
    139. 139. Body ¶ 1 Body ¶ 2 Body ¶ 3
    140. 140. Body ¶ 1 One way the author demonstrates the message of ‘letting go’ is through Marlin’s change from the exposition to the dénouement. In the exposition, Marlin is timid, shown by his poor joke. This trait is also shown in his fear of leaving home. In the dénouement, Marlin has let go and is shown to be a humorous risk-taker, shown by his race with Nemo and his successful joke.

    ×