Packaging

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Packaging

  1. 1. Packaging 101Why we plan packages, not just Stories
  2. 2. 1. Wait for the story to come in2. Find whatever photo seems to work best3. Stare at a blank computer screen4. Throw together a design that follows basic design rules, and hope for the best. Too Many Newspaper Designers Work This Way:
  3. 3. • If you plan your coverage with packaging in mind, instead of stories, you will end up with a more cohesive, interesting design that is more informative and easier to read! BONUS- it is also easier to design! Change the Way you Plan your Coverage
  4. 4. • Photo• Headline• Infographic• StoryThis is how you should be thinking about EACH story youcover! Notice the order? The story is the LAST thing youthink about! A Basic Should Include:
  5. 5. • The writer and designer should communicate with the photographer before each event. Discuss specific types of shots you would like taken for your story. Be specific: if you want a shot that shows worm’s eye view of the track star after he finishes the 3200 meter run, taken in a vertical format tell the photographer! The Photo:
  6. 6. • The headline should be the first thing the reader sees. It should be well written, clear, and should draw the reader into the package. Having an idea of how you want the headline designed ahead of time will make designing the package as a whole easier and more effective. The Headline:
  7. 7. • You can really bring the package together by giving the reader more information that enhances the story. This is a great way to include facts, extra quotes, background information, etc. that would not be appropriate to include in the story.• Info graphics also help break up the space, giving you more flexibility as a designer and another entry point into the story. The Info graphic:
  8. 8. • Limit the story to just that: the story. Offer anecdotes, meaningful quotes and emotion that all good literature contains. The Story:
  9. 9. • White Space• Multiple entry points• Relationship Things to Remember:
  10. 10. 1. Bio Box2. Event Fast Facts3. List4. Quote Collection5. Checklist6. List of Info7. Glossary8. Diagram9. Timeline Types of Info graphics
  11. 11. Bio Box
  12. 12. Event Fast Facts
  13. 13. List
  14. 14. Quote Collection
  15. 15. Checklist
  16. 16. List of Info
  17. 17. Glossary
  18. 18. Diagram
  19. 19. Timeline
  20. 20. • http://newspagedesigner.org/• http://visual.ly/ Sources:

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