Literate environment analysis presentation

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Literate Environment Analysis Presentation for Walden University. …

Literate Environment Analysis Presentation for Walden University.
Dr. Denise Love- The Beginning Reader, Pre-K EDUC-6706R-9

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  • 1. Literate Environment Analysis Presentation Joyce Rohde Walden University Dr. Love The Beginning Reader, PreK-3 EDUC-6706R-9 June 17, 2011
  • 2. Getting to Know Literacy Learners
    • Gather data to gain insight of non cognitive aspects of students’ literacy development.
    • *It is important to find out about the whole child because identity is the core of non cognitive aspects of literacy (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010a).
    • Gather data to gain insight of cognitive aspects of students’ literacy development.
    • *It is important to plan lessons and organize students according to developmental stages so a student is being taught at the appropriate level (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010b).
  • 3. Analysis Gathering non cognitive data on the literacy development of my three students helped me create a literate environment by allowing me to get to know each student. Learning that my students’ were animal lovers, liked to grow plants, and enjoyed outdoor activities helped me choose texts that engaged them in learning. It also helped to “bridge the old to the new” Laureate Education, Inc., 2010c).
  • 4. Analysis
    • Gathering cognitive information was key in helping me determine that all three students were on the same reading level.
    • It allowed me to have a better understanding of their phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, fluency, comprehension, and writing.
    • Having a better understanding of their level of literacy development in the “Five Pillars” of literacy instruction helped guide my instruction to suit the needs of each student.
    • References:
    • Laureate Education, Inc., (Executive Producer). (2010c). [Webcast]. Changes in literacy education .
    • Baltimore, MD: Author.
    • Laureate Education, Inc., (Education Producer). (2010b). [Webcast]. Getting to know your students.
    • Baltimore, MD: Author.
    • Laureate Education, Inc., (Executive Producer). (2010a). [Webcast]. Literacy autobiographies. [Webcast]. Learning experiences . Baltimore, MD: Author.
  • 5. Selecting Texts
    • Choose texts that will be appropriate, engaging, and best suited to students’ needs.
    • Literacy Matrix (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010a).
    • Online Texts
  • 6. Analysis for Selecting Text
    • Informational texts in the classroom can increase opportunities for home-school connections to literacy (Castek, Bevans-Mangelson, & Goldstone, 2006).
    • The informational text chosen for my students related to their interests and provided background information, which helps develop higher order thinking skills and comprehension
    • (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010b).
    • What is a Plant, by Louise and Richard Spilsbury, was chosen to address science standards. The goal was to use cognitive strategies to activate prior knowledge, predict, question, create mental images and transfer them to other settings independently (Stahl, 2004).
  • 7. Analysis for Selecting Text
    • The narrative text was chosen to use as an online read aloud. Studies show using the Internet for teaching and learning provides students with opportunities to acquire skills and strategies they will need for contributing to the workplaces of the 21 st century ( Castek, Bevans-Mangelson, & Goldstone, 2006).
    • References:
    • Castek, J., Bevans-Mangelson, J., & Goldstone, B. (2006). Reading adventures online: Five ways to
    • introduce the new literacies of the Internet through children’s literature. Reading Teacher , 59(7),
    • 714-728. doi:10.1598/RT.59.7.12
    • Laureate Education, Inc., (Executive Producer). 2010a). Education Today. [Webcast]. Analyzing and
    • selecting texts . Baltimore, MD: Author.
    • Laureate Education, Inc., (Executive Producer). (2010b). [Webcast]. Informational texts in the early
    • years . Baltimore, MD: Author.
    • Stahl, K. A. D. (2004). Proof, practice, and promise: Comprehension strategy instruction in the primary grades.
    • Reading Teacher , 57(7), 598-608.
  • 8. Literacy Lesson: Interactive Perspective
    • The ultimate goal of the interactive perspective is to teach children to be literate learners who can navigate through a text independently (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010a)
    • Use schema as a strategy for comprehension
    • Use instructional strategies that address the needs of students and the demands of a text (Walden University, 2011).
  • 9. Analysis for Literacy Lesson: Interactive Perspective
    • Learning Objective: The students were asked to illustrate and label the parts of a plant.
    • Text: What is a Plant? Written by Louise and Richard Spilsbury.
    • The shared reading lesson allows a teacher to model fluency and the effective reading skills and strategies, and models conventions of print such as one-to-one matching, directionality, and word boundaries.
  • 10. Analysis for Literacy Lesson: Interactive Perspective
    • These practices allowed me to focus on making meaning from the text by making connections to their own lives. Using schema is a good strategy for understanding text (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010b).
    • The purpose was made clear during the introduction of the lesson. The students brainstormed what they knew about plants, went over vocabulary words, and made predictions about the jobs of plant parts. We stopped after reading each section describing each plant part and the job it performs to discuss if predictions were correct. These instructional practices address the needs of the students and the demands of the text by helping build comprehension of vocabulary words and how plants survive (Walden University, 2011).
  • 11. References:
    • Laureate Education, Inc., (Executive Producer). (2010a). Interactive perspective: Strategic processing. [Webcast]. Learning Experiences. Baltimore, MD: Author.
    • Laureate Education, Inc., (Executive Producer). Virtual field experience: Strategic processing. [Webcast]. Learning Experiences. Baltimore: MD: Author.
    • Walden University. (2011). Framework for literacy instruction. Retrieved from http://sylvan.live.ecollege.com/ec/crs/default.learn?CourseID=5093728.
  • 12. Critical and Response Perspective
    • The Critical Perspective allows students to examine a text critically and think more deeply about what they are reading (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010a).
    • The Response Perspective allows students to make meaningful connections to text (Laureate Executive, Inc., 2010b).
  • 13. Analysis for Literacy Lesson: Critical and Response Perspective
    • The purpose of this lesson was to give the beginning readers the opportunity to evaluate and think critically about the narrative text, Tops and Bottoms , by Janet Stevens.
    • This practice helped me create a literate environment by giving my students time to think about the characteristics of plants and the characteristics of the two characters in the book.
    • The critical perspective gave the students the opportunity to understand how the situation between the characters was unjust.
    • The response perspective gave the students a chance to write a personal response to the story. It is important to engage our students in reading and writing to discover what they have to say because the more they write about what they read, the more the will understand what they read (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010c).
  • 14. References:
    • Laureate Education, Inc., (Executive Producer). (2010a). Critical
    • perspective. [Webcast]. Learning experiences . Baltimore, MD:
    • Author.
    • Laureate Education, Inc., (Executive Producer). (2010b). Response
    • perspective. [Webcast]. Learning experiences . Baltimore, MD:
    • Author.
    • Laureate Education, Inc., (Executive Producer). (2010c).
    • Responsive perspective: Reading –writing connection.
    • [Webcast]. Learning experiences . Baltimore, MD:
    • Author.
    • Stevens, J. (1995). Tops and bottoms. San Diego, CA: Harcourt, Inc.