• Save
Lewis  Carroll Presentation
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Lewis Carroll Presentation

on

  • 2,916 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
2,916
Views on SlideShare
2,606
Embed Views
310

Actions

Likes
3
Downloads
0
Comments
0

8 Embeds 310

http://svetlanakirsanova.blogspot.ru 149
http://chaosinblogland.blogspot.co.uk 133
http://svetlanakirsanova.blogspot.com 17
http://www.slideshare.net 4
http://www.svetlanakirsanova.blogspot.ru 3
http://chaosinblogland.blogspot.com 2
http://translate.googleusercontent.com 1
http://www.svetlanakirsanova.blogspot.ru&_=1076533639171 HTTP 1
More...

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Lewis  Carroll Presentation Lewis Carroll Presentation Presentation Transcript

  • Lewis Carroll and his works
  • Carroll’s Early Life
    • Birth name was Charles Lutwidge Dodgson
    • Born January 27, 1832 in English town of Daresbury
    • Had 10 siblings
    • Very imaginative child
    • Exceptionally skilled in mathematics
    • Wrote magazines containing poems, stories, and drawings at young age to entertain his brothers and sisters
  • Carroll’s Life Continued
    • Studied at Oxford University (Christ Church) and received degree in mathematics
    • Became a teacher and later became a priest also
    • Very conservative and orderly person
    • Socially awkward around people and only felt comfortable around young girls
    • The young girls that he most adored were the daughters of the dean of students (Henry Liddell) where he taught
  • Carroll’s Life Continued
    • Especially adored the young Alice Liddell and she became the inspiration for the main character of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland
    • Carroll was inspired by the freedom and wisdom that childhood had to offer
    • This inspiration created his love for children’s literature
  • Carroll’s Life Continued
    • Carroll didn’t enjoy the fame that he received from his success as a writer
    • Tried to stay out of the spotlight as much as possible
    • Carroll died on January 14, 1898
  • Carroll’s Works
    • Most Notable Books
      • Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland
      • Bruno’s Revenge and other Stories
      • Original Games and Puzzles
      • The Hunting of the Snark
      • Sylvie and Bruno
      • Through the Looking Glass
      • What the Tortoise Said to Achilles
      • Alice’s Adventures Underground
      • The Game of Logic
      • Symbolic Logic
      • A Tangled Tale
  • Carroll’s Works
    • Most Notable Poems
      • A Sea Dirge
      • Upon the Lonely Moor
      • The Walrus and the Carpenter
      • Phantasmagoria
      • Jabberwocky
      • The Hunting of the Snark
  • Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland Illustrations by Sir John Tenniel
  • Through the Looking-Glass Illustrations by Sir John Tenniel
  • The Walrus and the Carpenter Illustrations by Sir John Tenniel
  • The Hunting of the Snark Illustrations by Henry Holiday
  • Jabberwocky
    • ‘ Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
    • Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
    • All mimsy were the borogroves,
    • And the mome raths outgrabe.
    • "Beware the Jabberwock, my son!   The jaws that bite, the claws that catch! Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun   The frumious Bandersnatch!“
    • He took his vorpal sword in hand:   Long time the manxome foe he sought -- So rested he by the Tumtum tree,   And stood awhile in thought.
    • And, as in uffish thought he stood,   The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame, Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,   And burbled as it came!
    • One, two! One, two! And through and through   The vorpal blade went snicker-snack! He left it dead, and with its head   He went galumphing back.
    • "And, has thou slain the Jabberwock?   Come to my arms, my beamish boy! O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!'   He chortled in his joy.
    • `Twas brillig, and the slithy toves   Did gyre and gimble in the wabe; All mimsy were the borogoves,
    • And the mome raths outgrabe.
    Illustration by Sir John Tenniel
  • Graphic References
    • http://www.facade.com
    • http://www.erowid.org
    • http://www.bygosh.com
    • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Hunting_of_the_Snark
    • http://www.jabberwocky.com