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Strategic Doing: Designing and Achieving Measurable Workforce Development Objectives with Action-Oriented Collaboration

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Slides used on August 22, 2014 in Sellersburg, Indiana with civic leaders from the Ivy Tech Community College Southern Indiana Region/Indiana WorkOne Region 10 to develop a strategic action plan for a …

Slides used on August 22, 2014 in Sellersburg, Indiana with civic leaders from the Ivy Tech Community College Southern Indiana Region/Indiana WorkOne Region 10 to develop a strategic action plan for a ready pipeline of workers for the region's manufacturing industry.

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  • 1. Strategic Doing: Designing & Achieving Measurable Outcomes with Action-Oriented Collaboration Ivy Tech – Southern Indiana Region/WorkOne Region 10 Sellersburg, Indiana August 22, 2014 Copyright 2014 – Ed Morrison & Scott Hutcheson This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.
  • 2. Better understand he nature of collaboration Identify what stage your collaborations are in Consider ways to move a collaborations to the next level Mountain Home, Arkansas
  • 3. •Social Organizations – economics, education, politics •Individual Human – language capacity, knowledge accumulation, design and use of tools •Animal – mobility, information processing •Plants – viability •Open Systems – matter, energy •Cybernetics – computers •Clockworks – engines •Frameworks – buildings, cells Hierarchy of Complex Systems Complex i t y 6 Boulding, K. (1956). General systems theory—the skeleton of science. Management Science 2(3): 197-208.
  • 4. The Extension Economist Vs. The Rocket Scientist 7
  • 5. •Social Organizations – economics, education, politics • Individual Human – language capacity, knowledge accumulation, design and use of tools •Animal – mobility, information processing • Plants – viability •Open Systems – matter, energy •Cybernetics – computers •Clockworks – engines •Frameworks – buildings, cells Hierarchy of Complex Systems Complex i t y 8 Boulding, K. (1956). General systems theory—the skeleton of science. Management Science 2(3): 197-208.
  • 6. •Social Organizations – economics, education, politics • Individual Human – language capacity, knowledge accumulation, design and use of tools •Animal – mobility, information processing • Plants – viability •Open Systems – matter, energy •Cybernetics – computers •Clockworks – engines •Frameworks – buildings, cells Hierarchy of Complex Systems Complex i t y 9 Boulding, K. (1956). General systems theory—the skeleton of science. Management Science 2(3): 197-208.
  • 7. •Social Organizations – economics, education, politics • Individual Human – language capacity, knowledge accumulation, design and use of tools •Animal – mobility, information processing • Plants – viability •Open Systems – matter, energy •Cybernetics – computers •Clockworks – engines •Frameworks – buildings, cells Hierarchy of Complex Systems Complex i t y 10 Boulding, K. (1956). General systems theory—the skeleton of science. Management Science 2(3): 197-208.
  • 8. Strategic Doing enables people to form action-oriented collaborations quickly, move them toward measurable outcomes, and make adjustments along the way.
  • 9. Strategic Doing Leverages the Value of a Network 10 nodes, 9 connections 10 nodes, 45 connections
  • 10. Strategic Doing Accelerates Collaboration Turf Trust TIME Sharing Resources Sharing Information Mutual Awareness Co-Execution Co-Creation Acknowledgment Exploration Cooperation Collaboration Innovation Adapted from Collaboration Continuum from ACT for Youth
  • 11. Strategy Answers Two Basic Questions
  • 12. Strategic Doing Divides the Two Basic Questions into Four Appreciative Questions 17
  • 13. Strategic Doing Moves from the Linear to the Agile
  • 14. Strategic Doing Is Iterative & Ongoing
  • 15. • Think about workforce issues differently • Accelerate the collaborations needed to address them • Create and guide agile, asset-based strategic action plans to meet a progressive series of clearly defined objectives Addressing Workforce Issues
  • 16. • Think about workforce issues differently • Accelerate the collaborations needed to address them • Create and guide agile, asset-based strategic action plans to meet a progressive series of clearly defined objectives Addressing Workforce Issues
  • 17. Practicing Strategic Doing 22
  • 18. Strategic Doing Pack Sellersburg , IN - August 22, 2014 Our Table’s Framing Question: Our Knowledge Keeper Name and e-mail: Our Table Guide name and e-mail: _ Copyright© 2014, Purdue University, all rights reserved Table of Contents What’s your 30/30? What COULD we do together? What WILL we do together? Section Explanation Page Group Assets Identify assets we are willing to share Page 2 What Could we do together? Brainstorm how we might connect our assets Page 3 What Could we do together? Connect assets and define 1-3 new opportunities Page 4 What Should we do together? Select 1 opportunity & define a successful outcome Page 5 WhatWill we do together? Define a Pathway project and action plan to get us to our outcome Page 6 WhatWill we do together? Map our successful Outcome, a Pathway Project and key next steps Page 7 What’s our 30/30? Define a process moving forward Page 8 Participant List Sign-in sheet – tear off to pass, reattach to the pack after completed Page 9 What SHOULD we do together? What would it look like if our area had a ready pipeline of qualified candidates for the jobs in the manufacturing community?
  • 19. Focus Areas for Today 30 1. Changing Regional Perceptions 1. Changing the Image of Manufacturing 2. Addressing Technical Skills Valued by Manufacturers 3. Addressing Employability or “Soft” Skills Valued by Manufacturers
  • 20. Framing Community Conversations
  • 21. Reframing Workforce Issues Appreciatively 32 People can’t pass the drug screenings needed to work for our region’s manufacturers.
  • 22. Reframing Workforce Issues Appreciatively 33 People can’t pass the drug screenings needed to work for our region’s manufacturers. BECOMES
  • 23. Reframing Workforce Issues Appreciatively 34 People can’t pass the drug screenings needed to work for our region’s manufacturers. BECOMES What would a collaboration look like that assured an ample, constant pipeline of drug-free candidates for our region’s manufacturing jobs ?
  • 24. 1. Changing Regional Perceptions 2. Changing the Image of Manufacturing 3. Addressing Technical Skills Valued by Manufacturers 4. Addressing Employability or “Soft” Skills Valued by Manufacturers Develop Appreciative Questions
  • 25. Strategic Doing Pack Sellersburg , IN - August 22, 2014 Our Table’s Framing Question: Our Knowledge Keeper Name and e-mail: Our Table Guide name and e-mail: _ Copyright© 2014, Purdue University, all rights reserved Table of Contents What’s your 30/30? What COULD we do together? What WILL we do together? Section Explanation Page Group Assets Identify assets we are willing to share Page 2 What Could we do together? Brainstorm how we might connect our assets Page 3 What Could we do together? Connect assets and define 1-3 new opportunities Page 4 What Should we do together? Select 1 opportunity & define a successful outcome Page 5 WhatWill we do together? Define a Pathway project and action plan to get us to our outcome Page 6 WhatWill we do together? Map our successful Outcome, a Pathway Project and key next steps Page 7 What’s our 30/30? Define a process moving forward Page 8 Participant List Sign-in sheet – tear off to pass, reattach to the pack after completed Page 9 What SHOULD we do together? What would it look like if our area had a ready pipeline of qualified candidates for the jobs in the manufacturing community?
  • 26. Strategic Doing Question 1: What couldwe do together? Introduce yourselves by describing 1-2 assets you are willing to share in a new network Identify the assets Everyone should outline 1-2 assets they are willing to share. Assets can be tangible (places to meet,money, Internet resources, and so on) or intangible (knowledge, experience, networks, passions). Focus your conversation not somuch on what people do, but on what they are willing to share to a new network. Listen carefully for what people are willing to share and how connections using these assetsmight be built. Examples: Bill K – connected to young professionals; Jane S -- skill of conducting surveys; Susan D. – social networking skills; Bob S – understanding of City government Name Assets Use the next page to connect the assets to create new opportunities. 2
  • 27. Strategic Doing Question 1: What couldwe do together? Connect the assets you shared to create new opportunities. Brainstorming and Notes Quickly jot down connections that spring up from the discussion. Ask questions like ‘what would that look like‘ or ‘what if we…..’. Example of an opportunity connecting these assets: Bill K – connected to young professionals; Jane S – skill of conducting surveys; Susan D. – social networking skills; ;Bob S – understanding City government “We could use Jane’s and Bob’s knowledge and skills to create an online survey of ideas for connecting young adults to government . We can use Bill’s connection to young professionals to know who to survey and Susan’s social networking skills to survey online and thru venues such as Facebook and Twitter.” Use the next page to narrow your ideas to 3 opportunities 3 8
  • 28. Strategic Doing Question 1: What couldwe do together? Use the next page to convert one opportunity to an outcome Describe up to 3 opportunities 3 9 Narrow your ideas from the brainstorming phase to 3 the top choices that connect the assets How could you describe this opportunity in one or two phrases? Example: Start an initiative to introduce young people to city government Opportunity 1: Opportunity 2: Opportunity 3:
  • 29. Select ONE opportunity & define success Strategic Doing Question 2: What should we do together? Pick one of your opportunities and covert it to an outcome by defining measurable success Example: Our Opportunity: Connecting our assets could lead us to an open innovation “hack” for Government 2.0 Our Outcome: An engaged community of at least 20 volunteers who produce new prototypes for government services and launch at least one redesigned service by 2015. Use the next page to design a pathway to your outcome 4 1 Success characteristic 1: Engaged city government volunteers Metric: Number of volunteers Success characteristic 2: Young adults enrolled in the introduction course Metric: Number of young adults participating Success characteristic 3: At least one service project with the groups within a year Metric: One service project launched Our Outcome: How will you know if you’re successful? Hint: If you cannot figure out how to measure, the initiative is too vague to be useful. Characteristic 1: Measurement: Characteristic 2: Measurement: Characteristic 3: Measurement:
  • 30. Strategic Doing Question 3: Whatwill we do together? Name one “pathfinder” project that can get you to your outcome, then fill out the action steps in your project 1. Define a Pathfinder Project (a pathway that moves you to your outcome) 2. Define the pathway with 2-3 milestones (key steps that are critical to your success, so you know you are not getting lost) 3. Define an action plan for the next 30-90 days. Our Pathfinder Project: Milestone 1: By we will Milestone 2: By we will Milestone 3: By we will Our Action Plan for the next 30-90 days 4 2 Who Action Step ByWhen
  • 31. Strategic Doing Question 3: Whatwill we do together? Map your outcome and project Our Outcome.— (Where we are going): Our Outcome or Success metrics.— (How we know we have arrived): 1. 2. 3. Our Pathfinder Project.— (How we will get there): Milestones along our way.— (To make sure we are not lost): Our Key Action Steps to get started.— (What we will start doing by next week): 1. 2. 3. 4. 4 3
  • 32. Moving Forward Maintaining alignments and connections is a dynamic process requiring continuous (but not constant) attention. What’s been done in the last 30 days? What needs to happen in the next 30 ? Small amounts of time (1-2 hours per month) can be devoted to revising our strategy. The point is to come back together share what we have learned, realign ourselves, and figure out our next steps for the next 30 days. Internet Details How will you use the Internet to stay connected? We’ll use e-mail for now. Might focus on a group blog. Bill will explore. Internet Details How will you use the Internet to stay connected? Strategic Doing Question 4: What’s our30/30? 4 4 Follow-upMeeting (Sample) Date Dec 1 Time 2:00PM Place Conference call: Susan will arrange Follow-upMeeting Date Time Place
  • 33. 9 Strategic Doing Pack: Sellersburg The first step in a Strategic Doing workshop involves capturing the names and contact information of all the people around the table. Please pass around this sheet of the Master Pack, so that everyone can sign their name. Give this to the Table Guide or Knowledge Keeper and attach to the Master Strategic Doing Pack. Name Organization E-mail Materials developed by the Purdue Center for Regional Development - Please contact Peggy Hosea at PCRD for more information: phosea@purdue.edu.
  • 34. To know what you you’re going to draw, you have to begin drawing. - Pablo Picasso
  • 35. For More Information & to Connect Scott Hutcheson, Ph.D. 765-479-7704 hutcheson@purdue.edu www.linkedin.com/in/scotthutcheson/ www.twitter.com/jshutch64 www.facebook.com/scott.hutcheson http://www.slideshare.net/jshutch/ Copyright 2014 – Ed Morrison & Scott Hutcheson Slides available This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.

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