CFMC NWLC 20100902

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CFMC NWLC 20100902

  1. 1. Social Network Support Project: Network Weaver Learning Community Network Health and Lifecycles: Second in a Series of Four Sessions Community Foundation for Monterey County September 2, 2010 Thank you June Holley of Network Weaving, Monitor Institute, and Packard Foundation
  2. 3. Today’s Workshop <ul><ul><li>Reconnect and Share What You Did/Learned </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Network Health and Diagnostics Tool </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Current Issues – Peer Assist </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lifecycles of Networks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Network Strategy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Next Steps </li></ul></ul>
  3. 4. Today’s Goals <ul><li>Go deeper into sharing about your networks </li></ul><ul><li>Gain a better understanding about network health </li></ul><ul><li>Learn and try one self-organizing tool </li></ul><ul><li>Understand the life cycles of networks </li></ul>
  4. 5. Overall Training Goals <ul><li>By the end of the four sessions, participants will </li></ul><ul><li>be inspired to work with a network mindset and to continue weaving and building networks </li></ul><ul><li>have a deeper understanding of network theory, as it applies to social networks, and characteristics of a healthy network </li></ul><ul><li>be able to recognize the qualities of network weavers/leaders; recognize and affirm individual weaver qualities and successes </li></ul><ul><li>understand network life cycles </li></ul><ul><li>appreciate the role of evaluating networks and learn how the network can help evaluate its own progress </li></ul><ul><li>have practiced applying weaver practices and shared their challenges and learnings with each other </li></ul><ul><li>have received an introduction to network mapping software </li></ul>
  5. 6. It’s [Lawrence Community Works] informal; people can come in and out of the network. It’s easy and fun to be a part of and there is a lot to do. You make your own way through the maze. - Bill Traynor
  6. 7. Today’s Workshop <ul><ul><li>Reconnect and Share What You Did/Learned </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Network Health and Diagnostics Tool </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Current Issues – Peer Assist </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lifecycles of Networks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Network Strategy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Next Steps </li></ul></ul>
  7. 8. Characteristics of Healthy Networks
  8. 9. Value Participation Form Leadership Connection Capacity Learning & Adaptation <ul><ul><li>Clearly articulated give and get for participants </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Delivers value/ outcomes to participants </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Trust </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Diversity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>High engagement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Balance of top-down and bottom-up logic </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Space for self-organized action </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Embraces openness, transparency, decentralization </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Shared leadership </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Strategic use of social media </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ample shared space: on-line and in-person </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ability surface & tap network talent </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Model for sustainability </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mechanisms for learning-capture </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ability to gather and act on feedback </li></ul></ul>Governance <ul><ul><li>Representative of the network’s diversity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Transparent </li></ul></ul>Helpful Sources: M. Kearns and K. Showalter; J. Holley and V. Krebs; P. Plastrik and M. Taylor; J. W. Skillern; C. Shirky Characteristics of Healthy Networks: Overview
  9. 10. Characteristics of Healthy Networks: Value Value <ul><ul><li>Clearly articulated give and get for participants </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Delivers value/ outcomes to participants </li></ul></ul>
  10. 11. Characteristics of Healthy Networks: Participation Participation <ul><ul><li>Trust: strong relationships </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Diversity: bridging and valuing differences </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>High level of voluntary engagement </li></ul></ul>
  11. 12. Characteristics of Healthy Networks: Form Form <ul><ul><li>Balance of top-down and bottom-up logic </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Space for self-organized action </li></ul></ul>
  12. 13. Characteristics of Healthy Networks: Leadership <ul><ul><li>Embraces openness, transparency, decentralization </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Shared leadership </li></ul></ul>Leadership
  13. 14. Governance <ul><ul><li>Representative of the network’s diversity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Transparent </li></ul></ul>Characteristics of Healthy Networks: Governance Administrators 1,648 as of 4/29/09 Bureaucrats 29 active as of 12/22/08 Stewards 37 as of 3/3/09 Arbitration Committee 16 as of 3/21/09 Registered Users 9,540,944 as of 4/29/09
  14. 15. Characteristics of Healthy Networks: Connection Connection <ul><ul><li>Strategic use of social media </li></ul></ul>What’s your connection to mountaintop removal?
  15. 16. Characteristics of Healthy Networks: Connection Connection <ul><ul><li>Ample shared space: on-line and in-person </li></ul></ul>
  16. 17. Characteristics of Healthy Networks: Capacity <ul><ul><li>Ability surface & tap network talent </li></ul></ul>Capacity
  17. 18. Characteristics of Healthy Networks: Capacity <ul><ul><li>Model for sustainability </li></ul></ul>Capacity <ul><ul><li>Free </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>‘ Digital socialism’ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>‘ Freemium’ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pay your way / pay as you go </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Membership </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Funder / grant driven </li></ul></ul>
  18. 19. Learning & Adaptation <ul><ul><li>Mechanisms for learning-capture / storytelling </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ability to gather and act on feedback </li></ul></ul>Characteristics of Healthy Networks: Learning & Adaptation
  19. 20. <ul><li>How healthy is your network? </li></ul><ul><li>http://workingwikily.net/?p=1189 </li></ul>
  20. 21. You’ve diagnosed your network’s areas of strength and weakness. Now, what do you do? Answer: It depends…
  21. 22. Today’s Workshop <ul><ul><li>Reconnect and Share What You Did/Learned </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Network Health and Diagnostics Tool </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Current Issues – Peer Assist </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lifecycles of Networks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Network Strategy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Next Steps </li></ul></ul>
  22. 23. Today’s Workshop <ul><ul><li>Reconnect and Share What You Did/Learned </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Network Health and Diagnostics Tool </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Current Issues – Peer Assist </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lifecycles of Networks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Network Strategy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Next Steps </li></ul></ul>
  23. 24. How Networks Progress and Evolve Source: Valdis Krebs and June Holley, Building Smart Communities through Network Weaving 1. 2. 3. 4. Multi-Hub Small World Core Periphery Hub and Spoke Scattered Clusters
  24. 25. A Few Strategies for Network “Weaving”/ Development Bring together core of clusters of people who work together as peers Grow and engage periphery to bring in new resources and innovation Support overlapping projects or collaborations, many very small, initiated by many Nurture quality connections so projects can be high risk & high impact Source: June Holley, www.networkweaving.com
  25. 26. The Green and Healthy Building Network: 2005 Source: Barr Foundation “Green and Healthy Building Network Case Study” by Beth Tener, Al Neirenberg, Bruce Hoppe
  26. 27. The Green and Healthy Building Network: 2007 Source: Barr Foundation “Green and Healthy Building Network Case Study” by Beth Tener, Al Neirenberg, Bruce Hoppe
  27. 28. How can you strengthen your network? <ul><ul><ul><li>Identify your top 2-3 priority areas for improvement </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>For each… </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What are the open questions that need to be answered? </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What are steps you can take to address these questions? </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What can you do in the next month? </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Over the next 6 months? </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Over the next year? </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  28. 29. Today’s Workshop <ul><ul><li>Reconnect and Share What You Did/Learned </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Network Health and Diagnostics Tool </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Current Issues – Peer Assist </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lifecycles of Networks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Network Strategy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Next Steps </li></ul></ul>
  29. 30. A Few Strategies for Strengthening Your Network Close triangles Nurture quality connections Bridge difference Support overlapping projects Map the network Grow and engage the periphery Source: Adapted from June Holley, www.networkweaving.com . Source for Network Graphic: orgnet.com Monitor Institute
  30. 31. <ul><li>What type of structure does your network most closely resemble? </li></ul><ul><li>How did you get to this structure? </li></ul><ul><li>How is it working? Does it match your purpose? </li></ul><ul><li>How might your structure evolve / improve? </li></ul>Making Sense of Your Network Structure <ul><ul><li>Directions: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Decide what network you want to focus on today. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Draw a map of your network. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reflect on the questions below. </li></ul></ul>Monitor Institute
  31. 32. What are the three most important issues you need to address in order to strengthen your network? (Draw on insights from your network diagnostic.) 1. 2. 3. Issue #1: Barriers to overcome: Assets to tap: Actions to take: Issue #2: Barriers to overcome: Assets to tap: Actions to take: Issue #3: Barriers to overcome: Assets to tap: Actions to take: For each priority issue, explore: (1) barriers to overcome, (2) assets to tap in order to do so, (3) potential actions you might take. (Draw on the list of potential actions in the Network Development Tool.) Strategies for Strengthening Your Network Monitor Institute
  32. 33. We’re half way through! September 27, 1:00 to 5:00 PM Harden Foundation, 1636 Ercia St Network Participation and Engagment October 21, 1:00 to 5:00 PM MC Health Dept, 1270 Natividad Rd Network Tools
  33. 34. Today’s Workshop <ul><ul><li>Reconnect and Share What You Did/Learned </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Network Health and Diagnostics Tool </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Current Issues – Peer Assist </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lifecycles of Networks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Network Strategy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Next Steps </li></ul></ul>
  34. 35. http://workingwikily.net/resources.html#must-reads WorkingWikily Must-reads Beth’s Blog: How Nonprofits Can Use Social Media “A place to capture and share ideas, experiment with and exchange links and resources about the adoption challenges, strategy, and ROI of nonprofits and social media.” (By Beth Kanter.) Building Smart Communities Through Network Weaving An introduction to the basics on networks, how they evolve, and how they can be shaped for social impact—illustrated through a case study. (By Valdis Krebs and June Holley in 2006.) Net Gains: A Handbook for Network Builders Seeking Social Change A handbook covering the basics on networks –including their common attributes, how to leverage networks for social impact, evaluating networks, and social network analysis. (By Peter Plastrik and Madeleine Taylor in 2006.) The Networked Nonprofit An article about how nonprofit leaders are achieving greater impact by working through networks. Includes detailed examples. (By Jane Wei-Skillern and Sonia Marciano in 2008.) WeAreMedia Project: The Social Media Starter Kit for Nonprofits
  35. 36. <ul><li>Alone we can do little; </li></ul><ul><li>together we can do so much. </li></ul><ul><li>- Helen Keller </li></ul>

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