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CFMC NWLC 20100818

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This is the introductory/overview presentation to a group of network weavers in Monterey County.

This is the introductory/overview presentation to a group of network weavers in Monterey County.

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  • Begin with fun team-building exercise
  • What is your networks work? What are your burning questions related to networks? What’s a useful tool or resource you’ve come across lately that supports your networks work?
  • Results of pre-survey
  • We’re all part of networks… They’ve long been core to social change… And, there deep knowledge of networks resident in the social sector – community building, participatory decision-making
  • Weaving communities – or net-centric organizing -- is great way to strengthen ties in a community, to increase civic engagement and to nurture healthier communities MAVRAC=Monterey Area Volunteer Administrators Consortium, a group of leaders accountable for managing volunteer programs in organizations with a conservation mission. We talk about Bill Traynor’s work at Lawrence Community Works in the article. The Annie E. Casey Foundation has been supporting similar work across the country through their Making Connections Initiative; Making Connections is 10 year initiative that has been deliberately working to strengthen ties at the neighborhood level. The basic idea: to connect families to economic opportunity, to each other, to public services, and to other kinds of social support. The image here is an example from one of the several communities they’ve been working – Louisville, Kentucky. Residents in Louisville have developed a community network that links residents to one another and to opportunities – like jobs and childcare They now have 2300 members...and impressive results, such as over $4 mil generated in income from job placements through the network
  • Social media tools and working with a network mindset are making it possible to connect with connect with expertise, leaders, problem solvers that you may not have been able to access otherwise Lots of activity around this using competition models Most famous is Innocentive – which connects solution seekers with a network of problem solvers. Mostly a hub and spokes model – in which the problem solvers aren’t usually talking to one another
  • Indigenous people from Oaxaca pic from http://www.indigenousfarmworkers.org/index.shtml. There are a number of low-tech networking examples among the Indigenous, nonprofit organizations, schools, city government, and faith-based organizations. This is also happening on listserves and shared workspaces – like Google Groups
  • This is the work of learning networks or communities of practice The picture is of a community of practice I’ve been working with for the past year – the Network of Network Funders. It’s a group of funders all who are intentionally investing in networks and working to codify and improve their related grantmaking practices. We’ve been meeting together in-person and using an online space on WiserEarth to coordinate and share resources. Build and share knowledge is also what larger more decentralized online models of content co-creation, like Wikipedia, do A new example that I personally love – is a wiki that Packard’s OE program recently launched. They’ve created a resources site where they’re openly sharing resources on organizational and network effectiveness and, by using the wiki format, inviting others to add to and amend. It’s an exciting experiment in working wikily  
  • Network approaches can be a powerful means of motivating people to act and inspiring collective action After years of experience, Kaboom has developed a powerful approach to local communities in building playgrounds. But,they realized they couldn’t achieve nearly the level of impact they aspired to building one playground at a time. So they decided to open source their model – they created a free online DIY kit for playground builds that has empowered more than 6,000 communities to self-organize and build local playgrounds – compared to the 1700 that Kaboom was able to directly engage in building over 15 years. Lots of impressive examples of ‘Mobile Activism’ – SexInfo SF PeaceNet – coalition of Kenyan NGOs created a text messaging ‘nerve center’ for conflict management and prevention. Info on planned and actual attacks among rival groups shared and relayed to mediators in the local communities http://www.unfoundation.org/our-impact/stories-of-impact/health-data-disaster-relief/mobile-activism-make-text-not-war.html?authToken=6a3e0d6c35bad6c722411edc6009181ba411b921
  • CASP=Community Alliance for Safety and Peace (group of Monterey County community leaders from govt, educ, safety, health, faith-based, and other fields working for peace) Can also share Barr Mystic River network story here
  • In addition to group brainstorm – a few things to point out: Adapt to changing circumstances Act big without being big Get things done quickly Improve information flow Increase awareness of relationships Increase inclusion & peer interaction across traditional divides Open new resources Expand and support leadership Encourage innovation, collaboration & learning for better outcomes and breakthroughs
  • Cluster of nodes of the same type show a pocket of close relationships between a set of individuals Hub and spoke network shows reliance on a single individual as the center of a group Links connect two nodes (thickness shows strength of relationship)
  • 42 invited to take survey; 34 responded (81%) and named 98 others. This map shows 132 people, representing 87 different organizations.
  • 92 invited; 55 responded (60%) and named 123 others. This map shows 178 individuals from 93 organizations. Ideal periphery = 3-5x core with diverse background or expertise
  • 73 invited to take survey; 47 responded (65%) and named 119 others. This map shows 168 people, representing 133 different organizations.
  • You may be taking on multiple of these roles – in particular, weaver, facilitator, tech steward Catalyst : establishes value proposition(s); establishes first links to participants (during ‘knitting the network’ stage). Sponsor : provides resources for knitting, organizing, growing and transitioning / transforming the network. Weaver : works to increase connections among participants; grows the network by connecting to new participants (during ‘knitting the network’ ‘growing the network’ stages). Coach : provides advice as needed, once trust is established and power dynamic is well understood. Participant : participates in the network without assuming discrete leadership role. Assessor : diagnoses network needs.
  • What do you do as a net weaver that’s working?
  • Examples of each of these Discussion with participants about what they’d like to experiment with… last bullet esp important Have participants write down what they’re going to do

Transcript

  • 1. Social Network Support Project: Network Weaver Learning Community Community Foundation for Monterey County Diana Scearce and Janet Shing August 18, 2010 Thank you June Holley of Network Weaving, Monitor Institute, and Packard Foundation
  • 2. A Few Questions to Begin to Weave Our Network
  • 3. What Are Your Network Challenges?
    • Scarce resources
    • Time
    • Regular participation
    • Diverse participation (e.g. differing capacity for follow-through)
    • Increasing participation
    • Geographic isolation—distance from core network activity
    • Leveraging social media
    • Political infighting—focus on individual vs. shared interests
    Source of photo: http://hullstudent.com/files/minisites/2288/People.jpg
  • 4. Today’s Workshop
      • Introductions and Your Networks Work
      • Overview, Context, Goals
      • What Are Networks? Why Do They Matter for Social Change?
      • Characteristics of Healthy Networks
      • Monterey County Networks and Network Weaving
      • Vision for the Learning Community
  • 5. Intelligence emerges as the system connects to itself in new and diverse ways. - Meg Wheatley
  • 6. Today’s Goals
    • Understand definitions of networks, how they differ from organizations, functions of networks, characteristics of healthy networks, and qualities of weavers
    • Understand scope and expectations of four-part learning community
    • Decide or come close to deciding if you would like to continue being part of this learning community
  • 7. Overall Training Goals
    • By the end of the four sessions, participants will
    • be inspired to work with a network mindset and to continue weaving and building networks
    • have a deeper understanding of network theory, as it applies to social networks, and characteristics of a healthy network
    • be able to recognize the qualities of network weavers/leaders; recognize and affirm individual weaver qualities and successes
    • understand network life cycles
    • appreciate the role of evaluating networks and learn how the network can help evaluate its own progress
    • have practiced applying weaver practices and shared their challenges and learnings with each other
    • have received an introduction to network mapping software
  • 8.
    • Community Foundation’s Interest
    • in the Social Network Support Project
    • Assess community assets, needs, and priorities so CFMC can make appropriate grants and other contributions to community development.
    • Describe current network and use as baseline for joint reflection, priority-setting, increased knowledge communication, cooperation, coordination, monitoring, and planning.
  • 9.
    • Why You?
  • 10.
  • 11. Today’s Workshop
      • Introductions and Your Networks Work
      • Overview, Context, Goals
      • What Are Networks? Why Do They Matter for Social Change?
      • Characteristics of Healthy Networks
      • Monterey County Networks and Network Weaving
      • Vision for the Learning Community
  • 12. What Is a Social Network? Monitor Institute A collection of people connected by relationships
  • 13.
    • network
    • adjective : connected, transparent, decentralized
    • verb : to connect, to spread, to organize into a network
    • noun : a structural form for organizing
    Monitor Institute
  • 14. Centralized Decentralized Note: These categories often overlap. Most of the examples fit in to multiple categories.
      • Nonprofit organizations ( without explicit network structure)
      • Membership organizations (Organizations with network component)
      • Nonprofits with explicit network strategy and structure
      • Coalition / Alliance (network of organizations)
      • Networks of networks
      • Ad hoc networks
    Monitor Institute. Developed from: Plastrik, Taylor, “Net Gains,” (2006); Anklam, “Net Work,” (2007); Krebs, Holley. “Building Smart Communities,” (2006).Source for Network Graphics: orgnet.com A Typology of Organizing Structures
  • 15. Networks Aren’t New… Monitor Institute
  • 16. … and New Online Spaces for Connecting People But, There Are New Tools for Sharing Content Monitor Institute
  • 17. Combined With New Understanding of Social Ties
    • “ If someone tells you that you can influence 1,000 people, it changes your way of seeing the world. ”
      • Dr. James Fowler
    Monitor Institute
  • 18.
    • ‘ Working wikily’ is an emerging leadership style characterized by greater openness, transparency, decentralized decision-making, and collective action
    Enabling Social Change With a Network Mindset Source of network image: orgnet.com Monitor Institute
  • 19. What Do We Mean by “Network Mindset”?
      • Centralized
      • Firmly controlled
      • Planned
      • Proprietary
      • Transactional
      • One-way
      • communications
      • Decentralized
      • Loosely controlled
      • Emergent
      • Open, shared
      • Relational
      • Two-way
      • conversations
    Where are you? The answer will be different for different situations Monitor Institute Established Ways of Working Social Change with a Network Mindset
  • 20. How Do Coalitions Relate to Networks?
      • Problem and answer are clear
      • Whole group decision-making
      • Whole group planning
      • Whole group acts
      • Reach goal through planned action
      • Problem complex; solution unclear
      • Network does not make all decisions together
      • Experimenting, sharing results
      • Many collaborative projects
      • Emergent change
    What is needed for your situation? The answer will likely be a combination of coalition and network models. Adapted from June Holley Coalition-centric Network-centric
  • 21.
    • Why do networks matter for social change and what can they help you DO?
  • 22. Weave Communities MAVRAC Monitor Institute
  • 23. Access Diverse Perspectives Monitor Institute
  • 24. Access Diverse Perspectives Monitor Institute
  • 25. Build and Share Knowledge Monitor Institute
  • 26. Mobilizing People and Building Movements Source: Breaking New Ground: Using the Internet to Scale , by Heather McLeod Grant and Katherine Fulton; photos from KaBOOM! website Monitor Institute
  • 27. Coordinate Resources and Action Monitor Institute
  • 28. Why do networks matter for your work? What are the benefits?
  • 29. Why is it Hard to Work with a Network Mindset? Unlearning past behaviors and frameworks Dealing with information overload Brand and message control Privacy concerns Learning and leveraging new technologies Assessing impact Source of images: Cut Throat Communications, Blog.com, Rutgers University RU FAIR, Kodaikanal International School, flickr Managing for accuracy Monitor Institute
  • 30. Today’s Workshop
      • Introductions and Your Networks Work
      • Overview, Context, Goals
      • What Are Networks? Why Do They Matter for Social Change?
      • Characteristics of Healthy Networks
      • Monterey County Networks and Network Weaving
      • Vision for the Learning Community
  • 31. Value Participation Form Leadership Connection Capacity Learning & Adaptation
      • Clearly articulated give and get for participants
      • Delivers value/ outcomes to participants
      • Trust
      • Diversity
      • High engagement
      • Balance of top-down and bottom-up logic
      • Space for self-organized action
      • Embraces openness, transparency, decentralization
      • Shared leadership
      • Strategic use of social media
      • Ample shared space: on-line and in-person
      • Ability surface & tap network talent
      • Model for sustainability
      • Mechanisms for learning-capture
      • Ability to gather and act on feedback
    Governance
      • Reflective of the network’s diversity
      • Transparent
    Helpful Sources: M. Kearns and K. Showalter; J. Holley and V. Krebs; P. Plastrik and M. Taylor; J. W. Skillern; C. Shirky Characteristics of Healthy Networks Monitor Institute
  • 32. Today’s Workshop
      • Introductions and Your Networks Work
      • Overview, Context, Goals
      • What Are Networks? Why Do They Matter for Social Change?
      • Characteristics of Healthy Networks
      • Monterey County Networks and Network Weaving
      • Vision for the Learning Community
  • 33.
    • Why is Community Foundation interested in this?
    • Nonprofit organizations have the potential to increase their effectiveness and have a greater impact in the community and in their field by actively engaging in a network.
  • 34. A Few Helpful Definitions Core Monitor Institute Link Node Cluster Periphery Hub
  • 35. Adult Literacy, Monterey County, June 2009 Visualizing the Overall Network Some school-based and government agencies in the core (1, pink and blue), with nonprofits outside (2, red). Only one faith-based organization (3). 1 2 3 Type of Organization nonprofit government faith-based fdn/grantmaker school unknown
  • 36. Greenfield Network, September 2009 Visualizing the Overall Network Mix of types of orgs in the core but mainly nonprofit and govt (1, red and blue; schools on edge of core - turquiose), relatively small periphery (2, yellow). Relatively few Greenfield-based (3) 1 2 3 Type of Organization nonprofit government other fdn/grantmaker religious school named, but did not take survey
  • 37. Environment, Monterey Bay, November 2009 Visualizing the Overall Network Nonprofits, educ inst, and govt make up the core (1 turquoise, blue, and black); couple hubs (2) and many nodes who could easily be brought into core (3) 1 2 3 Type of Organization nonprofit organization educational institution government agency grassroots / informal group named, but did not take survey
  • 38. Youth, Monterey County, July 2010 Visualizing the Overall Network 1 Nonprofits and govt make up the core (1 red and black); schools on periphery (2 yellow); and those working on safety and violence prevention are well-integrated (3) 2 3 Type of Organization government funder nonprofit collaborative other faith-based named, but did not take survey school
  • 39. Youth Development Network Salinas October 2007 - 150 surveyed; 35% (53) responded A map of all the different networks shows fairly loose connections. Funders and non-profits compose most of the core (1, blue and black nodes), surrounded by sub-clusters of government actors (2, red nodes). Schools are not as well connected (3, yellow nodes spread around the periphery). One can also see a number of poorly connected individual networks (4) Government Agency Foundation Non-Profit For-Profit School Unknown Religious Other All Networks by Organization Type
  • 40. Metrics scores are calculated by responses to network questions (e.g., shared resource, collaboration, future collaboration, energize/ideas)
  • 41. Metrics continued…
  • 42. What Roles Can You Play?
    • Catalyst or Organizer
    • Sponsor
    • Facilitator /Coordinator
    • Coach
    • Technology Steward
    • Participant
    • Assessor
    • Weaver
    ‘ Network weaving’ can cut across many of these roles Monitor Institute
  • 43.
    • Weaving is the intentional practice of helping people to build – and connect to – more relationships of trust and value, mostly by virtue of being genuinely interested in building and connecting oneself to more relationships of trust and value … Weaving is genuine human caring and love…
    • Bill Traynor
  • 44.
    • What are the characteristics and skills of an effective network weaver?
    Source for Network Graphic: orgnet.com
  • 45.
    • Convene diverse people and groups
    • Engage network participants
    • Generate cooperation and collective action
    • Broker connections and bridge difference
    • Build social capital – emphasize trust and reciprocity
    What is the Work of Network Weaving? Source: Adapted from Net Work by Patti Anklam (2007) and “Vertigo and the Intentional Inhabitant: Leadership in a Connected World” by Bill Traynor (2009) Source of picture: flickr Monitor Institute
  • 46. What is the Work of Network Weaving? (cont.)
    • Nurture self-organization
    • Genuinely participate . Influence from the inside
    • Leverage technology
    • Create, preserve, and protect network ‘space’
    Source: Adapted from Net Work by Patti Anklam (2007) and “Vertigo and the Intentional Inhabitant: Leadership in a Connected World” by Bill Traynor (2009) Source of picture: flickr Monitor Institute
  • 47. June Holley’s Network Weaver Checklist
  • 48.
    • Complete the self-assessment
    • Gather in groups of three and
      • Assign a time keeper so everyone has time for a turn
      • Share your top strength and challenge/ area for strengthening
      • As a group, brainstorm strategies for how you can overcome that challenge
    Instructions:
  • 49. What might a network weaver’s job include ?
    • Introduce network concepts and mapping
    • Connecting to enhance the network
    • Move the network to action
    • Build network support structures
    • Help others become Network Weavers
    • What else?
    What do you want to work on and/or experiment with? ?
  • 50. Today’s Workshop
      • Introductions and Your Networks Work
      • Overview, Context, Goals
      • What Are Networks? Why Do They Matter for Social Change?
      • Characteristics of Healthy Networks
      • Monterey County Networks and Network Weaving
      • Vision for the Learning Community
  • 51. Overall Training Goals
    • By the end of the four sessions, participants will
    • be inspired to work with a network mindset and to continue weaving and building networks
    • have a deeper understanding of network theory, as it applies to social networks, and characteristics of a healthy network
    • be able to recognize the qualities of network weavers/leaders; recognize and affirm individual weaver qualities and successes
    • understand network life cycles
    • appreciate the role of evaluating networks and learn how the network can help evaluate its own progress
    • have practiced applying weaver practices and shared their challenges and learnings with each other
    • have received an introduction to network mapping software
  • 52. Input for the Learning Community
    • What are the topics you want to work on (including topics addressed today to go deeper on)?
    • What are live projects / issues you’re dealing with that you’d like to work on with this learning community?
    • What do you want to work on or experiment with between now and our next gathering?
  • 53. “ Networks are everywhere. We just need an eye for seeing them.” Albert- Laszlo Barbarasi