GBL-Basics_workshop
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  • 1. Jennifer Groff July 2013 Games-based Learning
  • 2. The power of game-based learning
  • 3. “PlayfulLearning”
  • 4. Let’s play!
  • 5. bit.ly/lurelab
  • 6. Time’s Up!
  • 7. GBL 101
  • 8. ‘Grand-Theft Calculus’
  • 9. x=y2
  • 10. ethical thinking
  • 11. What is it?
  • 12. Definition: Game-based learning (GBL) is a form of learning where students may learn by trial and error, by role-playing and by treating a certain topic not as ‘content’ but as a set of rules, or a system of choices and consequences. “ ”
  • 13. Taxonomy Short-Form Long-Form COTS Educational
  • 14. Short-Form Games • fit into a single class period • typically focus on a specific concept or skill
  • 15. Long-Form Games • extend to multiple sessions or even weeks • focus on developing concepts and 21st century skills • performing better than lectures...
  • 16. Genres • Drill & Practice • Puzzle • Interactive Learning Tools • Role Playing • Strategy • Sandbox • Action/Adventure • Simulations
  • 17. Examples
  • 18. drill & practice
  • 19. drill & practice
  • 20. puzzle
  • 21. puzzle
  • 22. puzzle
  • 23. puzzle
  • 24. Lure of the Labyrinth interactive learning tools
  • 25. Lure of the Labyrinth role-playing (RPG) 12 million users
  • 26. Lure of the Labyrinth role-playing (RPG)
  • 27. Lure of the Labyrinth role-playing (RPG)
  • 28. strategy
  • 29. strategy
  • 30. strategy
  • 31. Lure of the Labyrinth action/adventure
  • 32. simulations
  • 33. Lure of the Labyrinth simulations
  • 34. Minecraft sandbox
  • 35. bit.ly/gbl-hw Homework #1
  • 36. What can games really teach?
  • 37. Algebra Grammar ecology Physics Epidemiology fractions addition civics argument construction empathy societal dynamics global challenges comprehension
  • 38. Games for ethical thinking & moral development
  • 39. ethical thinking game.org
  • 40. Using games in the classroom
  • 41. Use games as preparation for future learning.
  • 42. Use games as pre-assessments.
  • 43. Allow sufficient time to become familiar with the game—for you and your students.
  • 44. Identify the precise role to be played by using the game in achieving the learning goals.
  • 45. Allow the game to be played outside of school.
  • 46. Be clear about the learning objectives.
  • 47. Use the parts of the game that work for you.
  • 48. Let the students demonstrate expertise.
  • 49. Build in time for review and reflection.
  • 50. Selecting a game: • suitable for your students? • what elements of the game support your educational goals? • would your students be motivated to use it?
  • 51. Gamification≠ game-based learning
  • 52. Do games for learning really work?
  • 53. Supercharged! 28% increase in learning
  • 54. Virtual Cell 30-60% increase in learning
  • 55. River City 370% increase in learning for D students 14% increase for B students
  • 56. Game-based learning is overall effective and knowledge gains are comparable to traditional forms of teaching. Connolly, Boyle, MacArthur, Hainey, & Boyle, 2012 Brom, Preuss, Klement, 2011
  • 57. Games enhance both student and teacher engagement. Watson, Mong, & Harris, 2010
  • 58. Games transform a traditional, teacher-centric classrooms into a learner-centered classrooms. Watson, Mong, & Harris, 2010 Proctor & Marks, 2012 Sandford, Ulicsak, Facer, & Rudd, 2006
  • 59. Games increase student motivation. Watson, Mong, & Harris, 2010 Brom, Preuss, Klement, 2011 Bourgonjon, Valcke, Soetaert, & Schellens, 2010 Villalta, Gajardo, Nussbaum, Andrew, Echeverria, & Plass, 2011 Sandford, Ulicsak, Facer, & Rudd, 2006
  • 60. “When digital games were compared to other instruction conditions without digital games, there was a moderate to strong effect in favor of digital games in terms of broad cognitive competencies.” [An analysis of 77 peer-reviewed journal articles of students K-16 studying STEM subjects]
  • 61. Games are ideal learning environments Why games?
  • 62. As a planet, we spend 3 billion hours a week playing video and computer games.
  • 63. Innovative Learning Environments Project
  • 64. 7 Building horizontal connections 6Assessment for learning 4Recognize individual differences 2The social nature of learning 5 Stretching all students 3 Emotions are integral to learning 1 Learners at the center 7 Principles of Learning
  • 65. Games offer: • authentic challenges (engagement/motivation) • scaffold/support increasingly complex problems (ZPD, Flow) • learning through doing - participatory (constructivist) • social/collaborative (socio-constructivist)
  • 66. Gee’s Principles bit.ly/ gee-principles
  • 67. How’s your algebra?
  • 68. Resources
  • 69. Platform
  • 70. .com beta. @playfullearn #playfullearning facebook/playfullearn
  • 71. pinterest.com/lgamesnetwork /learning-all-the-time/
  • 72. the GAME DESIGN TOOL KIT PRESENTED BY LEARNING GAMES NETWORK & FABLEVISION
  • 73. Start the research process and establish common gaming vocabulary.
  • 74. Brainstorming, creative development, and early documentation.
  • 75. Paper prototype and sample art/audio asset development.
  • 76. Play testing and concept “pitch”.
  • 77. Thank you! Jennifer Groff jen@learninggam.es