Futurelab - Consolarium - Console Games Research

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Futurelab - Consolarium - Console Games Research

  1. 1. Console game-basedpedagogy: A review of Scotland’s Consolarium Initiative Jennifer Groff Presentation at the Media Learning Conference London, 2010
  2. 2. Jointly Sponsored Project
  3. 3. Jointly Sponsored Project
  4. 4. Participating Primary Schools Balmedie Primary School Cathkin Community Nursery Cowie Primary School Cumbernauld Primary School Dalry Primary School Elrick Primary School Gavinburn Primary School Hallside Primary School Lairdsland Primary School Longhaugh Primary School Meldrum Primary School Musselburgh Grammar School Secondary Bo ness Academy The Community School of Auchterarder Grangemouth High School Inverurie Academy Perth High School St Andrew s and St Bride s High School Wallace High School
  5. 5. ParticipatingSchools
  6. 6. console games
  7. 7. The argument for GBL Two Key Themes:− The desire to harness the motivational power of games in order to ‘make learning fun’;− A belief that ‘learning through doing’ in games such as simulations, offers a powerful learning tool.These findings frame the three key aspects to GBL: • motivation • skill development • immersive learning environments Kirriemuir & McFarlane, 2004
  8. 8. Games as learning systemsGames as authoring systems generating artefactsGames as content systems contentGames as manipulating systems simulationsGames as trigger systems contentGames as gateway systems learning technologyGames as reflective systems illustrationGames as point-of-view systems perspectiveGames as code systems programmingGames as documentary systems documentaryGames as ideological systems textGames as research systems researchGames as assessment systems evaluation Klopfer, Osterweil & Salen, 2009
  9. 9. Games as learning systemsGames as authoring systems generating artefactsGames as content systems contentGames as manipulating systems simulationsGames as trigger systems contentGames as gateway systems learning technologyGames as reflective systems illustrationGames as point-of-view systems perspectiveGames as code systems programmingGames as documentary systems documentaryGames as ideological systems textGames as research systems researchGames as assessment systems evaluation Klopfer, Osterweil & Salen, 2009
  10. 10. Methods
  11. 11. Interviews School Teachers Students Leaders 19 48 150School Visits / Classroom Observations• 4 schools (case studies)
  12. 12. Example of Console GBL
  13. 13. Guitar Hero with Primary 7
  14. 14. Guitar Hero with Primary 7
  15. 15. Key Findings
  16. 16. GBL approaches... are an excellent opportunity to engage students in activities which can enhance learning and produce a range of educational benefits
  17. 17. GBL approaches... need to be well planned and classrooms carefully organised to engage all students in learning and produce appropriate outcomes
  18. 18. GBL approaches... build on many children’s existing interests, skills and knowledge and can narrow the gap between children’s home and school cultures
  19. 19. GBL approaches... can increase communication between parents and teachers and school leaders and enhance parental engagement in children’s learning
  20. 20. GBL approaches... have the capacity to increase teacher motivation
  21. 21. Teachers often have to overcome a number of barriers and reservations about using game- based learning approaches in classrooms however, when they do so, they are convinced of the results
  22. 22. Teachers need support, from peers, school leadership and outside resources, in order to use games well for learning and mediate them effectively
  23. 23. Resourcing game-based learning approaches can be difficult but is often more accessible than other technologies further support would be beneficial
  24. 24. Curriculum for Excellence is seen by the people interviewed for the study as an opportunity to try out new things such as game-based learning complemented by emerging Assessment is for Learning criterion.
  25. 25. Taxonomy
  26. 26. Active learning Increased teacher motivationAuthentic learning contexts Interdisciplinary learningClosing the culture gap LevellingCollaboration & cooperation Literacy & numeracyCommunication Planning, takingCritical thinking responsibility andDigital literacy skills independent learningEngagement and motivation Preparation for the futureImproving relationships Problem-solving, trial & errorIncreased confidence &self-esteem Pupil-teacher roles Resilience
  27. 27. Teacher Perspectives
  28. 28. Benefits relating to teamwork &skills for life:•problem-solving•communication•collaboration•negotiation which were observed in various ways by teachers
  29. 29. “ Their motivation, you know, theywere totally engaged. They were ontask, they were very interested in it. They spoke about it a lot.... They were just highly motivated. ”
  30. 30. “ When you see the motivation and engagement for the pupils, I mean that’s your core goal, I think, as a teacher...if you’ve got that, the learning just comes on so much more. ”
  31. 31. “ And it was the children who actually organised itthemselves...they were dividingtheir tasks up into you find out ” about this and we’ll do that.
  32. 32. ““I saw the [Primary] 2s really using their skills and their language abilities of persuasion and just the way that theywere mature enough to negotiate. On thewhole, there was the odd one or two that didn’t get on but, on the whole the 2s were very good organisers and they made sure the task actually got done. ”
  33. 33. Perceived impact on theirteaching:•enjoyment & motivation•classroom management•curriculum organisation•teacher role•teacher skills
  34. 34. Student Perspectives
  35. 35. “ Probably the best topic we’ve ever done. ”
  36. 36. Perceived impact on learning:“ It has [impacted how I learn], because you don’t realise it, but you’re kind of learning the same way as you usually do without a Wii game, but it’s just…it feels like you’re having more fun with it. So it has kind of changed, because I know that now it’s pretty much the same, so now I look ” forward to school a lot more.
  37. 37. Perceived impact by students:•physical activity•increased interactivity•increased challenge & connections•visual•greater collaboration•student-driven
  38. 38. Perceived learning outcomes:•content•teamwork & cooperation•collaboration•focus & concentration•creativity & imagination•coordination, arguing your case, patience, responsibility, organisation, confidence, life skills…and more
  39. 39. failure
  40. 40. Perceived impact on writing:“ You learn how to write, it helps you see the pictures better in your head ” so you can write about it then.
  41. 41. Perceived impact on writing:“ [The project/game-play] encourages us to work — instead of being bored writing in the jotter, it’s fun playing the game and the better you get it encourages you to play ” more and want to write.
  42. 42. Perceived impact on home game play:“ You play it less, ‘cos you feel like you’ve had a go at it, so you do something else…or you play that game, but you don’t really enjoy it ” ‘cos it’s not the same as at school.
  43. 43. www.futurelab.org.uk
  44. 44. www.futurelab.org.uk/projects/console-games
  45. 45. Jennifer Groffjennifer_groff@mail.harvard.eduSue Cranmersue.cranmer@futurelab.org.ukCathrin Howellsc.howells@hw.ac.uk

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