Bas webinar informing instruction and measuring growth

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  • Pages 112-114
  • Sometimes assessments given, data recorded but then not sure how to use the data.The continuum can be a bridge between assessment data and where to go nextWith the assessment we learn what students know,; the continuum will help you think about what they need to know nextWe begin with pages 112, 113 and 114 in the Assessment Guide. Using BAS with whole gr, small gr, and individualsToday we will dig deeper into whole group and small group literacy teaching
  • Not discussing materials hereTeaching contextsLevels of support/scaffolding
  • Over the next few hours we will READ, THINK ABOUT, TALK ABOUT and USE the text RESOURCES We will process the wealth of information In order to deepen our understandings and develop ways of using the resources to plan for teaching that will move each of our students, our classroom communities to live literate lives. We will begin…Take your COLL, turn to your grade level
  • Help participants make a connection between the lit. discussion and interactive read aloud and how LD and IRA are grouped together because literature discussion really has its foundation in IRA. Help them build the understanding that literature discussion develops out of the talk around interactive read aloud…this are an essential foundation of a good language and literacy program.support learning in every other area.are a way of nourishing the intellect of your students by:expanding background, vocabulary, and languagedeveloping an appreciation for inquiry.are a way of creating a literate community in your classroom.Fountas, I.C. & Pinnell, G.S. (2006). Teaching for Comprehending and Fluency: Thinking, talking, and writing about reading K-8. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. p. 215 – 216.is where children learn how to talk about their reading.
  • An interesting groupThe teacher’s languageChildren naturally finding evidence, demonstrating understanding, thinking8:22
  • An interesting groupChildren naturally finding evidence, demonstrating understanding, thinking
  • Let’s look at how Caitlin facilitated the discussion of this textThis type of discussion has occurred many times in a whole class setting – interactive read aloudsThe teacher has chosen rich texts and taught the group how to respond, discuss, share their thinkingThis group is now trying it out in a small group contextThe teacher will help them move towards discussing more with each other using the same norms they use with the whole class – less back & forth with the teacher as they engage in with more texts together
  • How do we meet students where they are and take them where they are going?How do we accelerate student learning and also get them to enjoy reading and writing?Common visionSpecific body of understandings from K-8 Clear goals and specific lessons across many instructional contexts
  • Use Kris Pelletier’s Ask Nicely (K) IRA video. Have them record the ways the teacher supports the students in thinking within, beyond and about text and the behaviors the students demonstrate before looking at the Continuum.Once they have shared these observations, compare them to the Kindergarten Continuum and add any new insights.
  • Just a few behaviors we observe
  • Explain what opening moves are, text talk/embedded teachingShould look like a group of people sharing their thinking about a book together – something that we as adults do in book clubs. As we talk, our understanding and the way we look at a text deepen.Begin with an opening move pre-planned by the teacher to engage the students’ interest and activate thinking in various way.Include intentional conversation – pre-planned conversational moves directed toward a goal of instruction.Kerry’s Notes to trainer:Hand out a description of your interactive read aloud including where you chose to pause and think aloud, etc. to review this structure.Discuss how you chose the text and how you used the Continuum to get the group thinking within, beyond and about text. You may want to take them to the section of the Continuum you used to plan your IRA and have them scan the Selecting Texts side for some of the characteristics of the text you shared to get an idea of how to use this section. If you use Momma, Where are You From, you will find this description in the read aloud section of the course notebook. The description details the different strategic actions/bullets I pulled from the fourth grade IRA Continuum in planning this IRA.
  • If time is an issue – 1 hour is allocated for slides 1- 32 Use this grade 2 example at a later session – Slides 27 & 28 with video clip
  • Variety of texts critical
  • Using the comp conversation to inform the goals for IRA
  • List students from lowest to highestData management system will enable you to sort students by levelDelvin- Instructional D but indep. B, fluency at D not good- placement CSpencer- above, work with I to give him group experience but will challenge him through indep. Reading and writing about reading. Ideally you would have a group for each level but there isn’t enough time to teach that many groups. Err on the side of making it too easy for some than too hard for others. Dynamic groupingSpecialists-How might you assist classroom teachers in making these decisions? Recommended placement level•Accuracy at the instructional and/or placement level•Fluency at the instructional and/or placement level•Comprehension at the instructional and/or placement level•Analysis of reading behaviorNumber of students at each level
  • Determine levels Form groupsConsider characteristics of textsStrengths and needs- known, introduce, reading workPlan word work, teaching point, writing about readingNotice and support behaviors as students readLook ahead toward next levelMove up when students control a majority of the behaviors
  • Level O- advance the webinar to the slide that looks similar to this but say Level O Walk through G ContinuumGive time to skim behaviors.
  • Once finished, advance to this same slide after the Level O lesson to pick up with Alice on implementing the assessment efficiently.
  • Walk through O continuum
  • Linked to previous trip and upcoming tripInteresting text structure- supporting students with how the text works, not like many other books students have readReminded of own science journalsDrew attention to format of book/how it was laid out. Drew attention to photos, sketches, information on one page is similar topicUnderlying structure- temporal sequence, purpose of using this Didn’t go over every “tricky” word, just a few to demonstrate the process of using context clues
  • Read silentlySampled oral reading and interacted brieflyStudent #1- Help student learn how to break a word apartStudent #2- clarify who the narrator is “I”
  • Lots of thinking about the textDiscussed layout- spiral and made it seem like you were reading someone’s journal (authenticity)Use of first person also made it seem authentic, Close attention to author and illustrator helped them conclude it was fictionIdentified author’s purpose although it wasn’t explicitly stated- layout gets the reader interestedAuthentic wondering about how the author and illustrator might have workedShared parts of the text they thought were interesting and tell whyTP- Authors choose to use details for specific reasons. Must scan and read the entire page so that what they read will make sense. (based on her observations of students as they read).
  • Assessment Guide Page 35
  • Assessment Guide page 35
  • Assessment Guide page 35
  • Assessment Guide Page 35
  • Assessment Guide page 35
  • Assessment Guide Page 35
  • Bas webinar informing instruction and measuring growth

    1. 1. Webinar #4 Informing Instruction and Measuring Growth
    2. 2. • Transfer the information gleaned from the BAS to focused literacy teaching and learning. • Use the data gleaned and assessment strategies from the BAS to inform daily instruction. • How to better utilize the Continuum of Literacy Learning.
    3. 3. For this webinar you will need:  The Continuum of Literacy Learning  The Benchmark Assessment System 1 or 2 Assessment Guide
    4. 4. The results of Benchmark Assessments can be used to plan for… • Individual Instruction • Small Group Instruction • Whole Class Instruction
    5. 5. Linking Assessment to Instruction using The Continuum of Literacy Learning
    6. 6. Scaffolding through teaching contexts Teacher Child Interactive Read Aloud Shared Reading Guided Reading Literature Discussion Independent Reading Scaffolding through teaching contexts
    7. 7. Whole group Interactive Read Aloud Literature Discussion
    8. 8. Interactive Read Aloud and Literature Discussion When children are actively listening to and discussing a text, all of the strategic actions for comprehending are in operation. In an interactive read aloud, the listener is freed from decoding and is supported by the oral reader’s fluency, phrasing, and stress – all elements of what we sometimes call expression. The scene is set for a high level of comprehending or thinking together through a text. COLL, Pages 8-10
    9. 9. • Listen in –Grade 1 group in their first literature discussion •Julius, Baby of the World • Return to the webinar
    10. 10. Thinking within the text Understand the problem of a story Recognize characters and report important details after reading Thinking beyond the text Bring background knowledge to understanding characters and their problems Make connections between texts and their own life experiences Use evidence from text to support predictions Make connections between familiar texts and discuss similarities and differences Thinking about the text Notice similarities and differences among texts that are by the same author or are on the same topic Have opinions about texts and state the basis for opinions (tell why)
    11. 11. Julius, Baby of the World What did you think? Why? How is she feeling? …in the beginning? Why? Do you agree? Share what you are thinking Did that help you understand the story? Why? Did Lily love Julius? Ah, (restating) just not showing it What changed? Who said it?
    12. 12. Our ultimate goal as teachers is to help each student in our schools become a reader who loves books and all they have to offer. Reading is more than basic decoding competency. It has the potential to nourish the intellect, the emotions and the spirit. It feeds and replenishes the art and skill of writing. A child who lives a literate life in school and has pleasurable experiences with written language will make a place for reading and writing throughout life. Fountas, I.C. & Pinnell, G.S. (2006). Teaching for comprehending and fluency: Thinking, talking, and writing about reading. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. p. 3.
    13. 13. Pause the webinar to view Ask Nicely Work in partners while observing. #1. Record the ways the teacher supports her students in thinking within, beyond and about text. #2. Record the reading behaviors of the students. How do their behaviors demonstrate their thinking within, beyond and about text? Return to the webinar
    14. 14. Ask Nicely Thinking within the text – Notice and derive information from pictures – Bring background knowledge to understanding characters and their problems – Talk about characters, problems and events in a story – Acquire new words from listening and use in discussion – Understand the meaning of words during reading Thinking beyond the text – Infer characters feeling and intentions Thinking about the text – Understand that an author wrote the book – Understand that an artist illustrated the book
    15. 15. Ask Nicely Oral, Visual and Technological Communication Listening and Speaking • Listen with attention and understanding to oral reading of stories… • Compare personal knowledge with what is heard Content • Begin to verbalize reasons for problems, events and actions • Offer solutions and explanations for story problems
    16. 16. The Structure of Interactive Read Aloud Selection and Preparation Opening Reading Aloud Embedded Teaching Text Talk Discussion and Self Evaluation Record of Reading Fountas, I.C. & Pinnell, G.S. (2006). Teaching for comprehending and fluency. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. p. 222.
    17. 17. Opening Moves & Embedded Teaching if you want to get the most instructional power from interactive read alouds, it is important to plan for teaching in a more precise way. © Fountas, I.C. & Pinnell, G.S., (2001). Guiding Readers and Writers Grades 3-6. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. P 222.
    18. 18. Planning in a Precise Way: Opening Moves • …set the tone for the reading • …should vary © Fountas, I.C. & Pinnell, G.S., (2001). Guiding Readers and Writers Grades 3-6. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. P 228.
    19. 19. What kind of expectations might one set for active listening?  Prompt children to anticipate a book by a favorite author.  Ask children to make connections to a previously read text.  Alert children to unusual features of the text, such as the structure or narrator.  Provide important background information  Raise questions to spark curiosity  Lay the groundwork for children’s understanding of diverse settings and people.  Raise questions in the readers’ mind. © Fountas, I.C. & Pinnell, G. S. (2006). Teaching for Comprehending and Fluency. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. Pp. 226 - 227.
    20. 20. Planning in a Precise Way: Embedded Teaching Intentional Conversation (embedded teaching): • ..the talk is intentional because you have in mind the reading process and the particular text you are sharing. • …as the more expert other, you are guiding and shaping the conversation so that your students learn more about the kind of thinking (systems of strategic actions) readers use © Fountas, I.C. & Pinnell, G.S., (2001). Guiding Readers and Writers Grades 3-6. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. P 228.
    21. 21. • Pause the webinar – Listen in to Loretta sharing Grandma’s Purple Flowers with her 2nd graders – Have your copy of The Continuum of Literacy Learning open to Interactive Read Aloud and Literature Discussion Grade 2 • After viewing – Using the Continuum, discuss the text selection. – Discuss the goals you observed. • Return to the webinar
    22. 22. Grandma’s Purple Flowers • How did the introduction/opening impact the experience for the children? • When Loretta modeled her thinking, what kind of thinking was she modeling? • When Loretta asked questions of the children, what was the kind of thinking she was hoping to elicit from their responses?
    23. 23. Read alouds “embedded teaching” • Ask questions • Make comments • Model thinking Balance these for a rich discussion
    24. 24. Texts for Interactive Read Aloud Texts for Interactive Read Aloud • Are often displayed in the room for students to explore during independent reading • Are often organized in text sets based around themes, topics, authors, genre and are used as mentor texts in writer’s workshop • Represent the diversity of our world • Contain topics and themes for rich discussion • Are often picture books, but can be short stories, chapter books, poems, etc.
    25. 25. Reflection Pause the webinar to reflect – How will you use the results of the Benchmark Assessment System to plan for interactive read - aloud for your class? – How will you use The Continuum of Literacy Learning both to plan for interactive read - aloud and to monitor the progress of your class? Return to the webinar after sharing.
    26. 26. Assessment Guide p. 113
    27. 27. Components of a Guided Reading Lesson • Introducing the Text • Reading the Text • Discussing and Revisiting the Text • Teaching for Processing Strategies • Working with Words (optional) • Extending the Understanding of the Text (optional) Teaching for Comprehending and Fluency pp. 375-376
    28. 28. Assessment Guide p. 110
    29. 29. Pause the webinar and read the steps for connecting assessment to guided reading lessons on p. 116 of your Assessment Guide.
    30. 30. Introducing the Text 1. Pause the webinar and view the introduction to the text, Locked Out. Notice the behaviors Shannon (the teacher) attends to during the introduction. 2. Return to the webinar once you have viewed this portion of the lesson.
    31. 31. Introducing the Text Shannon provided opportunities for students to: • Make connections between the text and reader’s personal experiences. (Making Connections) • Use and interpret information from pictures. (Inferring) • Search for and use all sources of information in the text. (Searching for and Using Information) • Infer and interpret characters’ feelings, motives, and attributes. (Inferring) • Infer causes for feelings, motives, or actions. (Inferring) • Remember information to help in understanding the end of a story. (Summarizing)
    32. 32. Reading the Text 1. View the students reading the text, Locked Out. Notice the behaviors Shannon attends to as they read. 2. Return to the webinar once you have viewed this portion of the lesson.
    33. 33. Reading the Text Shannon provided opportunities for students to: • Recognize most words quickly and easily. (Solving Words) • Reflect language syntax and meaning through phrasing and expression. (Maintaining Fluency) • Demonstrate appropriate stress on words to reflect the meaning. (Maintaining Fluency) • Use meaning to monitor and self-correct reading (Monitoring and Correcting) • Search for and use all sources of information in the text. (Searching for and Using Information) • Reflect punctuation through pausing and intonation while reading orally. (Maintaining Fluency)
    34. 34. Discussing and Revisiting the Text 1. View the video of the students discussing and revisiting the text. Notice how Shannon helps them think and talk about what they read. 2. Return to the webinar once you have viewed this portion of the lesson.
    35. 35. Discussing and Revisiting the Text Shannon provided opportunities for students to: • Remember information to help in understanding the end of a story. (Summarizing) • Understand and talk about a simple sequence of events of a story. (Summarizing)
    36. 36. Teaching for Processing Strategies 1. View the video of Shannon teaching for processing strategies. Notice how she supports students with reading behaviors. 2. Return to the webinar once you have viewed this portion of the lesson.
    37. 37. Teaching for Processing Strategies • Demonstrate phrased, fluent oral reading (Maintaining Fluency) • Reflect language syntax and meaning through phrasing and expression. (Maintaining Fluency) • Reflect punctuation through pausing and intonation. (Maintaining Fluency)
    38. 38. Working with Words 1. View the working with words portion of the lesson. Notice how Shannon supports students in understanding how words work. 2. Return to the webinar once you have viewed this portion of the lesson.
    39. 39. Working with Words Shannon provided opportunities for students to: • Understand how to change beginning, middle, and ending letters- single consonants and vowels as well as blends and digraphs to make new words. • Use known words and word parts to solve unknown words. (Solving Words)
    40. 40. Pause and Reflect What big ideas are you taking away about noticing, teaching, and supporting behaviors and understandings in guided reading?
    41. 41. Introducing the Text 1. Pause the webinar and view the introduction to the text, Lake Critter Journal. Notice the behaviors Angie (the teacher) attends to during the introduction. 2. Return to the webinar once you have viewed this portion of the lesson.
    42. 42. Introducing the Text • Bring background knowledge to a text before reading. (Making Connections) • Specify the nature of connections. (Making Connections) • Demonstrate the ability to identify how a text is organized. (Analyzing) • Notice variety in layout. (Analyzing) • Notice how the author/illustrator has used illustrations and other graphics to convey meaning. (Analyzing) • Understand when a writer has used underlying organizational structures. (Analyzing) • Use the context of a sentence, paragraph, or whole text to determine the meaning of a word. (Solving Words)
    43. 43. Reading the Text 1. View the students reading the text. Notice the behaviors Angie attends to as they read. 2. Return to the webinar once you have viewed this portion of the lesson.
    44. 44. Reading the Text • Solve words of two or three syllables. (Solving Words) • Continue to monitor accuracy and understanding, self-correcting when errors detract from meaning. (Monitoring and Correcting)
    45. 45. Discussing and Revisiting the Text and Teaching for Processing Strategies 1. View the video of the students discussing and revisiting the text. Notice how Angie helps them think and talk about what they read. Also, notice how she supports students with taking on reading behaviors through her teaching point. 2. Return to the webinar once you have viewed this portion of the lesson.
    46. 46. Discussing and Revisiting the Text and Teaching for Processing Strategies • Bring background knowledge to the understanding of a text before, during, and after reading. (Making Connections) • Understand when a writer has used underlying organizational structures. (Analyzing) • Evaluate aspects of a text that add to enjoyment. (Critiquing) • Notice specific writing techniques. (Analyzing) • State opinions about a text and show evidence to support them. (Critiquing) • Identify important ideas in a text and report them in an organized way. (Summarizing) • Search for information in graphics. (Searching for and Using Information) • Notice variety in layout. (Analyzing)
    47. 47. Pause and Reflect What big ideas are you taking away about noticing, teaching, and supporting behaviors and understandings in guided reading?
    48. 48. • Provide efficiency strategies to enhance the planning. Administration and use of data for the BAS conferences
    49. 49. Making the Assessment Conference Efficient  Starting Point  Use reading records from the previous year  Use running records taken during small group reading – start at the highest independent reading level  Use the Where to Start Word Test
    50. 50. Making the Assessment Conference Efficient  Organized Materials  All materials for the conference organized and available (3 texts, 3 reading record forms, pencils, timer/calculator)
    51. 51. Making the Assessment Conference Efficient  Fluency Teach for all dimensions of fluency throughout the year for all students at all levels (level C and beyond). Pausing, Phrasing, Stress, Intonation, Rate, Integration
    52. 52. Making the Assessment Conference Efficient  Hard Text  Discontinue the reading record as soon as the number of errors indicate the text is hard
    53. 53. Making the Assessment Conference Efficient  Comprehension Conversation  Do not include the comprehension conversation if the text is hard  Engage in comprehension conversations during whole group reading, small group reading and individual conferring
    54. 54. • “ Children learn not only from your instruction but from the environment in which they live and work every day. They spend about six hours a day, 180 days a year, in a classroom – approximately 1,080 hours a year. During the nine years it takes children to progress from kindergarten and eighth grade, our children spent 9,720 hours in school or combining elementary and secondary school – 14,040 hours!
    55. 55. • That’s a lot of time to be in a room with twenty or thirty other people. Students learn best in a variety of social settings that take full advantage of the community learning power of collaboration and shared ideas. As they approach the challenge of reading, they benefit from many social contexts that are possible within a classroom community- whole group, small group and individual instruction. TCF xxvi

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