Early Emancipation in the North
Missouri Compromise, 1820
 
Characteristics of the Antebellum South <ul><li>Primarily agrarian. </li></ul><ul><li>Economic power shifted from the  “up...
Southern Society (1850) “ Slavocracy” [plantation owners] The “Plain Folk” [white yeoman farmers] 6,000,000 Black Freemen ...
Southern Population
Southern Agriculture
Slaves Picking Cotton on a Mississippi Plantation
Slaves Using the Cotton Gin
Changes in Cotton Production 1820 1860
Value of Cotton Exports  As % of All US Exports
“ Hauling the Whole Week’s Pickings” William Henry Brown, 1842
Slaves Working in a Sugar-Boiling House, 1823
Slave-Owning Population (1850)
Slave-Owning Families (1850)
Slaves posing in front of their cabin on a Southern plantation.
Tara  – Plantation Reality or Myth? Hollywood’s Version?
A Real Georgia Plantation
Scarlet and Mammie (Hollywood Again!)
A Real Mammie & Her Charge
The Southern “Belle”
A Slave Family
US Laws Regarding Slavery <ul><li>U. S. Constitution :   * 3/5s compromise [I.2]   * fugitive slave clause [IV.2] </li></u...
Slavery Was Less Efficient  in the U. S. than Elsewhere <ul><li>High cost of keeping slaves from escaping. </li></ul><ul><...
Slave Resistance 1.Refusal to work hard. 2.Isolated acts of sabotage. 3.Escape via the  Underground Railroad .
Quilt Patterns as Secret Messages The  Monkey Wrench  pattern, on the left, alerted escapees to gather up tools and prepar...
Slave Rebellions Throughout the Americas
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Antebellum South Slide S Hare

  1. 2. Early Emancipation in the North
  2. 3. Missouri Compromise, 1820
  3. 5. Characteristics of the Antebellum South <ul><li>Primarily agrarian. </li></ul><ul><li>Economic power shifted from the “upper South” to the “lower South.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Cotton Is King!” * 1860  5 mil. bales a yr. (57% of total US exports). </li></ul><ul><li>Very slow development of industrialization. </li></ul><ul><li>Rudimentary financial system. </li></ul><ul><li>Inadequate transportation system. </li></ul>
  4. 6. Southern Society (1850) “ Slavocracy” [plantation owners] The “Plain Folk” [white yeoman farmers] 6,000,000 Black Freemen Black Slaves 3,200,000 250,000 Total US Population  23,000,000 [9,250,000 in the South = 40%]
  5. 7. Southern Population
  6. 8. Southern Agriculture
  7. 9. Slaves Picking Cotton on a Mississippi Plantation
  8. 10. Slaves Using the Cotton Gin
  9. 11. Changes in Cotton Production 1820 1860
  10. 12. Value of Cotton Exports As % of All US Exports
  11. 13. “ Hauling the Whole Week’s Pickings” William Henry Brown, 1842
  12. 14. Slaves Working in a Sugar-Boiling House, 1823
  13. 15. Slave-Owning Population (1850)
  14. 16. Slave-Owning Families (1850)
  15. 17. Slaves posing in front of their cabin on a Southern plantation.
  16. 18. Tara – Plantation Reality or Myth? Hollywood’s Version?
  17. 19. A Real Georgia Plantation
  18. 20. Scarlet and Mammie (Hollywood Again!)
  19. 21. A Real Mammie & Her Charge
  20. 22. The Southern “Belle”
  21. 23. A Slave Family
  22. 24. US Laws Regarding Slavery <ul><li>U. S. Constitution : * 3/5s compromise [I.2] * fugitive slave clause [IV.2] </li></ul><ul><li>1793  Fugitive Slave Act . </li></ul><ul><li>1850  stronger Fugitive Slave Act . </li></ul>
  23. 25. Slavery Was Less Efficient in the U. S. than Elsewhere <ul><li>High cost of keeping slaves from escaping. </li></ul><ul><li>GOAL  raise the “exit cost.” </li></ul><ul><li>Slave patrols . </li></ul><ul><li>Southern Black Codes . </li></ul><ul><li>Cut off a toe or a foot. </li></ul>
  24. 26. Slave Resistance 1.Refusal to work hard. 2.Isolated acts of sabotage. 3.Escape via the Underground Railroad .
  25. 27. Quilt Patterns as Secret Messages The Monkey Wrench pattern, on the left, alerted escapees to gather up tools and prepare to flee; the Drunkard Path design, on the right, warned escapees not to follow a straight route .
  26. 28. Slave Rebellions Throughout the Americas

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