Disney case (caso disney) corporate turnaround -jarb

1,488 views

Published on

Caso disney
Corporate Turnaround
Walt Disney -King of Entertaiment
Disney case
Michael Eisner

0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,488
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
34
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Disney case (caso disney) corporate turnaround -jarb

  1. 1.   WALT DISNEY    He born in Chicago , Illinois 1901    He served in the Military  with his brother at age 16  Walt  Disney  was  an  entertainment  pioneer,  introducing  families to groundbreaking cartoons, feature films, theme  parks and more.    Walt Disney only aEended one year of high school.    1919  Walt dediced to make his love of art career, He got a  job at Kansas City Film AdverJsing Group.    He formed their own company called Laugh O Gram films.  The company.     With the help of Disney’s brother , Roy, the came up with  a series called Alice’s Wonderland in 1923.    The same year they moved the studios to Califronia   and  renamed the company to Walt Disney.    M.J Winkler was their distributer.   
  2. 2. 1927  Oswald  the  Lucky  Rabbit  became  very  popular  and  Walt  Managed  to  created  26  cartoons in one year.    Winkler  had  taken  the  rights  to  most  of  the  movies.    Walt needed to come up with a new cartoon  quickly  and  he  came  up  with  an  idea  named  MorJmer,  eventually  changed  to  Micky  Mouse.    1928 Steamboat Willie was the first cartoon to  have synchronized sounds.    Mickey  Mouse  became  the  most  famous  character of their company.  Snow white was the first cartoon to become a  major  moJon  picture  the  first  done  in  technicolor.    Disneyland       4:00 
  3. 3. Before Walt could see his project completed, he died on  December 1966 ending an era for the company.    1971 Walt disney World opened the doors to the public,  instantly  became  the  top  grossing  park  in  the  world,  pulling in$139 millions.    Disney opened an in‐house travel company in order to  generate traffic in the park.    They  started  the  parades  to  major  ciJes  all  over  the  world.    From  1980  to  1983  the  company’s  financial  performance deteriorated.   •  Disney  was incurring in heavy cost.  •  They  were  working  in  a  new  cable  venture,  The  Disney Chanell.  •  Film division performance remained erraJc.    Oil tycoon sid Bass invested $365 million, recusing the  company. 
  4. 4. Michael Eisner   •   He was the CEO of The Walt Disney Company  from 1984 unJl 2005.  •  Michael Eisner was recruited by Walt Disney  Company from Paramount Pictures in 1984 to  help Disney out of its financial slump in the  80’s. Eisner helped revamp Disney’s theme  parks as well as rejuvenaJng their movie  studio.  It was Eisner and his staff who turned the ailing  theme park company into a media powerhouse”     Eisner moved over to Disney from Paramount  taking along with him Jeffery Katzenberg to make  moJon pictures under two new brand names:  Touchstone Pictures and Hollywood  Pictures.  The Walt Disney  turnaround 
  5. 5. Michael Eisner on his  departure as CEO of Walt  Disney ProducEons  How firm can successfully manage a  turnaround situaJon and transform  a firm into  a period of long tern‐growht. 
  6. 6. Goals  •  Strengthening the human talent, giving  emphasis in creaJvity and innovaJon looking  for new and greater synergies between the  businesses.  •  ReposiJon the Brand  •  Improve the revenues in the current business  and revitalize businesses that had much  potenJal but had remained behind 
  7. 7. •  Inside decisions     •  Recovered and inculcated the Disneys´ history, the  corporate culture and the heritage of Walt Disney  through Disney University.  •  Established strategic and financial objecJves, well  defined and controlled thru indicators and incenJves.  •  Created a central area of markeJng to promote and  coordinate markeJng acJviJes across the enterprise.  •  Created an internal group to coordinate media  acquisiJons across the company, responsible for cross  work to support business focus on opJmize cost and  achieve beEer economies of scale agreements.   
  8. 8. •  Outside decisions  •  Recovered the movies with real actors, which led  Disney to become a market leader in the industry. He  also got some of the best Hollywod´s talents to sign  exclusive contract with Disney to ensure quality.  •  Improve profitability of theme parks, with extended  hours, increased price of Jckets, eliminated the  number of people who could enter each day, including  new aEracJons that aEract new public, built hotels  and others services for the costumers.  •  Improved the quality and the quanJty of the license  agreements of Disney´s characters, trademarks and  movies and reached big deals with major brands such  as Mc Donalds and Coca Cola.  
  9. 9. 0  2000  4000  6000  8000  10000  12000  1983  1984  1985  1986  1987  1988  1989  1990  1991  1992  1993  1994  1995  1996*  1997  1998  1999  2000  Axis Title  The WDC, Revenues  Theme Parks  Studio Ent.  Consumer Products  Media Com 
  10. 10. Michael Eisner has been widely criEcized in press releases of his  obsessive micromanagement and autocraEc leadership style.    Eisner was successful in aEaining financially posiJve goals for the Walt Disney  Company, but he did it at the expense of losing quality employees, business  relaJonships, as well as tarnishing the company’s image and reputaJon.     Eisner’s micro‐management style is reflected by a 2003 Time Magazine arJcle staJng that  Disney chief Michael Eisner never “misses the small points.  “not much escapes him”    “according to one former senior Disney execuJve, program decisions, script decisions –  even decisions on which writers might be signed deals – have oken had to go through as  many as six execuJves, headed by Mr. Eisner and Mr. Iger. ‘For six people to like the show is  never going to happen,’    ‘Michael and Bob make sure their operaJng execuJves have no real power’”    Eisner’s “micro‐management style has seriously hurt the creaEve process at the Disney  Studios. Eisner insists on having control over the creaEve process, and that he has to  authorize all story development 
  11. 11.  2012 Company Overview           Robert A. Iger :     •  Iger oversaw the acquisiJon of Pixar in 2006    •  He also led the company to acquire Marvel  Entertainment     Employees: 156.00    Revenue   US$ 40.893 billion (2011)  OperaEng income   US$ 08.043 billion (2011)  Net income   US$ 04.807 billion (2011)  Total assets   US$ 72.124 billion (2011)  Total equity   US$ 37.385 billion (2011)   
  12. 12.  2012 Company Overview               The Walt Disney Company, together with its subsidiaries and affiliates, is a leading  diversified internaJonal family entertainment and media enterprise with five  business segments: media networks, parks and resorts, studio entertainment,  consumer products and interacJve media.  11 theme parks and 43 resorts in  North America, Europe and Asia.  Disney, including Walt Disney AnimaJon Studios  and Pixar AnimaJon Studios; Disneynature;  Marvel Studios; and Touchstone Pictures.  This is accomplished through a franchise‐ based licensing organizaJon focused on  strategic brand prioriJes, including:  Disney Classic Characters & Disney Baby;  Disney Live Ac6on Film; Disney Media  Networks & Games, Disney & Pixar  Anima6on Studios; Disney Princess &  Disney Fairies; and Marvel. 
  13. 13. What is your evaluaJon of the  corporate turnaround  Conclusion 
  14. 14. Disney Ind  S&P 500 
  15. 15. 0  5000  10000  15000  20000  25000  30000  35000  40000  45000  50000  0  2  4  6  8  10  12  14  1983  1984  1985  1986  1987  1988  1989  1990  1991  1992  1993  1994  1995  1996*  1997  1998  1999  2000  ROA  ASSETS 

×