AMS NTX AEE June 2011
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AMS NTX AEE June 2011

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Presentation to the North Texas Association of Energy Engineers on Oncor's Advanced Metering System

Presentation to the North Texas Association of Energy Engineers on Oncor's Advanced Metering System

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  • Anyone seen one of these?
  • A bit about the Texas marketDeregulatedOncor and, also Centerpoint are T&D only companies – in the yellowCompetitive market for generation and retail electric serviceThe TDSPs are the FEDEX for electric transport, the enablers for the marketDo not directly own the customers but often take care of their concerns
  • Flexible, modular design97 interfaces
  • Flexibility of designWhere it makes sense, keep the bulk loads, otherwise run it through the bus.
  • Now we have a common portal for all TDSPsCommon interfaces for REPs, customers, ERCOT, and third partiesCurrently Oncor, Centerpoint are members, AEP joins next week, TNMP soon based on AMS filingCosts are determined annually & readjusted by meter count
  • Flexible, modular design97 interfaces
  • Gives the customers and REPs information about usageAllows for more informed energy usageData is available on a “one day” later, i.e. last nights data would appear todayNow we provide data on an FTP site to REPs
  • Consumer education is a key focus for Oncor’s AMS initiative. It is critical to make sure that consumers understand the benefits these meters provide and how to leverage the information they are gaining with the new system. Our communications team has devised a comprehensive plan with multiple touch points using a variety of marketing tactics to effectively reach consumers prior and during the deployment of their new advanced meters. Oncor will conduct telephone polling of consumers in our service area before and after the advanced meter deployment to measure awareness and perceptions about the new advanced meters and the ongoing consumer education campaign. Consumers will be notified in advance and the day of their meter install via door hangers in English and Spanish. These door hangers outline key benefits they will receive and will include a letter from the PUC Chairman, Barry T. Smitherman. Oncor is executing an aggressive media plan with print, theater, bill board and online advertising. We are also continuing our tours of the Mobile Experience Center that were started last year by taking the exhibit to the communities we serve for a combination of meter deployment events and local fairs and festivals. And finally, we will continue to generate consistent media coverage in our metering districts as we deploy that will also help build awareness.
  • The advanced meters are deployed by metering districts in a sequence that will enable Oncor to eliminate manual meter readings in an entire meter reading district. AMS will be deployed in metro areas and non-metro areas concurrently for operating efficiency and so that both urban and rural areas will essentially have equal access to advanced meters. A deployment plan approved by the PUC is available on our Web site at www.smarttexas.com. There will be a monthly surcharge of $2.19 per residential consumer to be paid once a month over the next 11 years. Three important areas were considered by the PUC when determining this surcharge: estimated capital costs, estimated operating and maintenance costs and estimated savings to be realized over the surcharge period. The $2.21 a month is one of the lowest in the nation and a minimal investment compared to the savings we can expect from reducing our demand. Consumers will be able to completely off-set this cost with the easy replacement of a 100 watt light bult for an Energy Star CFL light bulb.

AMS NTX AEE June 2011 AMS NTX AEE June 2011 Presentation Transcript

  • Smart Grid & Smart Meters
    Jonathan Pettit, P.E.
    June 16, 2010
  • What a Smart Meter is not
  • ~ 630 miles
    ~ 390 miles
    Oncor AMS Profile
    • 27,000 square miles of territory
    • 3.1 million meters
    • 107 customers (Retail Electric Providers –REP)
    • AMS Deployment 2008 – 2012
    • 3.4 million AMS meters by 2012
    • Current count is over 1.8 million AMS meters
  • Texas Competitive Electricity Market
    Power Generation Companies
    Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) acts as Settlement Agent
    Distribution
    Service
    Transmission
    Service
    Regulated Utilities deliver electricity
    Trans/Dist. Service Providers (TDSP)
    Retail Electric Providers sellto end-use consumers
    (REP)
    4
  • Smart Texas Overview
    Smart Texas is Oncor’s initiative to transform Texas’s electric transmission and distribution network into the most technologically advanced grid in the nation by 2012. Smart Texas includes Smart Grid and its advanced meter component, AMS.
    Smart Grid
    AMS
    • Definition: Transmission and distribution of electricity using a robust network of two-way communications, advanced sensors, and distributed computers
    • Purpose: Improve the efficiency, reliability, and safety of power delivery
    • Definition: Advanced meters and the associated hardware and software, communications systems, and information technology systems
    • Purpose: Provide timely access to consumption data, enabling consumers to make informed choices about energy use and reduce their energy costs
  • Smart Grid
    Applications
    • Distribution Management System (DMS)
    • Outage Management System (OMS)
    • Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA)
    • Mobile Workforce Management (MWM)
    • Meter Data Management System (MDMS)
    • Transmission Management System (TMS)
    • Web Portal
    Communications
    • Satellite
    • Radio Frequency (RF)
    • Fiber
    • Cellular
    • Broadband Over Power Line (BPL)
    • Power Line Carrier (PLC)
    • Pager
    Substation
    • Monitoring
    • Control
    • Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA)
    Fiber
    DistributionAutomation
    • Intelligent Switching
    • Capacitor Control
    SystemMonitoring
    • Voltage
    • Outage
    MarketSupport
    • Interval Reads
    • Demand Response
    • Retail Communication
    AdvancedMetering
    • Billing
    • Remote Sensing
    • Home Area Network (HAN)
  • 7
    What makes a smart meter in Texas?
    • Provides 15 minute interval data available on a historic “day after” basis
    Approximately 3000 reads per month vs. a historic 1 read per month
    • Demand side management opportunities
    Ability to provide time-of-use signals to customers
    Control of selected appliances and equipment via a home area network (HAN) using ZigBee Smart Energy Profile (SEP) 1.0
    Provide energy consumption information to consumers via in-home monitors
  • 8
    What makes a smart meter in Texas (con’t)?
    • Ability to remotely disconnect/reconnect customers
    Enables pre-paid retail pricing
    Eliminates safety issues of employees
    • Ability to get “on demand” readings of customer meters
    • Provides a common AMS web portal for customer, REP, or authorized third party, with access to customer data
    • Ability to provide a loss of voltage signal to the distribution system
    Future - provide data to outage monitoring system
    Future - coordinate with distribution automation
  • AMS Program Components
    In-home Monitors for Low-income Customers
    Radio Frequency (RF) Mesh and Back Haul Networks
    AMSMAXIMO
    LCIS
    HEADEND
    AMS
    AMSODS
    MDMS
    Customer Education Program, Including the Mobile Experience Center (MEC)
    IT Infrastructure, Integration, and Internal Web Portal
    Smart Meter Texas Portal for Consumers and REPs
    Advanced Meter Installation and Provisioning
  • Metering Technology Evolution
    Automated Meter (AMR)
    • 1980’s technology
    • Microprocessor Based
    • Automates meter reading function
    • Typically One Way Communication
    • One hour interval data
    • Low Data Bandwidth
    Advanced Meter (AMS)
    • 2009 Technology
    • Microprocessor Based
    • Two Way Communication
    • 15 minute interval data
    • Home Area Network
    • “Energy Management Device”
    • Remote Disconnect Switch
    • High Data Bandwidth
    Traditional Watt-Hour Meter
    • 1920’s technology
    • Electromechanical design
    • “Billing Meter”
    • Recorded total consumption for monthly billing
    • Accurate
    • Reliable
  • AMS Smart Meters
    Fully compliant with PUC regulations for advanced metering systems
    Remotely activated disconnects/reconnects
    Remote upgradability that eliminates onsite firmware and hardware changes
    Advanced functions recorded on the meter (e.g., demand, time of use, outage and restoration, load profile, voltage, and service quality measurements)
    Three distinct modules:
    Metrology module for metering functions
    Communication module for integrated, two-way communication with the RF Mesh network
    ZigBee-certified HAN module for communication with the HAN
    Meter data stored for a minimum of 35 days
    Built-in fraud detection
  • AMS Communication Networks
    Home Area Network
    In-Home Display
    SmartAppliances
    RF MeshNetwork
    900 MHz
    Backhaul Network
    Satellite, microwave, cellular, fiber, and wide area network
    Repeaters/Routers
    • Mounted on utility poles and street lights
    • Approximately 36 per collector
    • Approximately 9,000
    Back Office
    Collectors
    • Mounted on 70 ft. concrete poles
    • Four antennas on the top, and a control panel and backhaul communication box at the base
    • Normally located in substations, within substation fence
    • Approximately 250
    ITSystems
    Advanced Meters
    • Installed in residential and commercial premises
    • Meter-to-meter communication
    • Approximately 378 per repeater/router
    • Approximately 3.4 million
  • RF Repeater/Router
    Receives meter data from the smart meter via the RF Mesh network and forwards meter data to the appropriate collector:
    Installed and identified by GPS coordinates
    Radio antenna points down
    Serial number and Oncor logo visible from below
    Considered “low power” and not a hazard to work near
    Equipped with internal battery backup—can operate up to 8 hours without power
  • RF Repeater/Router Locations
    Normally mounted on street lights and utility poles
    “Extended height” routers for rural areas with low meter density
    Alternate design for pedestal mounts for neighborhoods with underground electricity
    Mounted on utility pole
    Mounted on street light
  • RF Collector
    Receives meter signals from the repeaters/routers via the RF Mesh and transmits them to the Command Center via the Backhaul network:
    Contain head end radios and backhaul communications for the AMS network
    Mounted on 70 ft. concrete poles
    Four RF Mesh antennas on top
    Locked control panel and backhaul communication box at the base
    Antenna
    Backhaul Communication Box
    Control Panel
    Top of Collector Pole
    Inside of Control Panel
    Base of Collector Pole
  • RF Collector Locations
    Normally located at substations, within the substation fence
    Exceptions for areas with low meter density or limited bandwidth
    Collector Takeout Point at Substation
    View of Collector Within the Substation Fence
    View of Collector Located Outside of Substation
  • IT Infrastructure and Integration
    • Significant IT system development and integration to meet 2009 commitments
    • IBM is the integration team
    • Concurrent Projects
    • AMS Interfaces (about 120)
    • Maximo (meter asset management)
    • Ecologic Analytics Meter Data Management System (MDMS)
    • Landis & Gyr Command Center (Head End)
    • AMS Security
    • Redefining Business Processes (new and old)
    • Meter to Back Office, Field Operations, Network Operations
    • Automation of many manual processes
  • Basic IT Structure
    Enterprise Service Bus
    CIS
    MAXIMO
    MIS
    Web Support Tools
    Smart Meter Texas Portal
    API
    API
    API
    Common Meter Data
    Meter and HAN Transactions
    API
    API
    API
    API
    Meter Data Replication (ETL)
    ERCOT
    Security
    15 Minute Settlement Data
    ETL
    ETL
    Ecologic Analytics MDMS
    ODS
    L+G Command Center
    Meter And HAN Transactions
  • Meter Data Flow
    Read the
    Meter
    Validate the
    Meter Data
    Transmit the
    Meter Data
    1
    3
    4
    On-Demand Reads via In-Home Display
    DATA
    REPOSITORY
    LCIS
    HAN
    HAN
    Bill-CycleMeter Data
    SmartAppliances
    Meter
    MDMS
    Meter & Customer Account Data
    Premise& BillingData
    Collect the
    Meter Data
    Daily Meter Reads & Interval Usage Data
    RF MeshNetwork
    MeterTransactions
    Meter & Customer Account Data
    Interval &Register Data
    AMSODS
    HEADEND
    Market
    Settlement
    Data
    Meter
    Attributes
    BackhaulNetwork
    RF MeshNetwork
    Meter
    Attributes
    Meter Attributes
    AMSMAXIMO
    Meter & Customer AccountData
    Repeater/Router
    Customer
    Account
    Data
    REPs
    Collector
    Smart Meter Texas Portal
    2
    Individual
    Account
    Data
    Oncor Internal Web Portal
    Consumer
  • 20
    Smart Meter Texas Portal(www.smartmetertexas.com)
  • Smart Meter Texas Portal
    REPs
    Customers
    21
  • 22
    Current SMT Features
    • Consumer, REP and TDSP user types
    • Spanish language and ADA support
    • Account and Meter Management
    • Customer and REP HAN Device Provisioning
    • Online and Adhoc reporting with graphing, including
    • Daily Usage (15 min interval)
    • Daily Meter Reads
    • REP messaging
    • Online help with demo and FAQs
    • APIs available for REPs for machine to machine interaction
  • Smart Meter Texas Portal – Customer Presentment
    23
  • 24
    Conduct a Thorough Customer and Stakeholder Education Program
    Focus will be on benefits to the individual:
    Target audiences include:
    Campaign emphasizes interactive touch/feel
    • Solid outreach program aimed to promote understanding of AMS
    • Host local site events across Oncor system to educate general public
    • End use customers
    • Retail electric providers
    • Local and state officials
    • Community-based outreach groups
    • Putting control in the hands of consumer
    • Ability to have positive impact on environment
    24
  • 26
    Oncor’s SMART TEXAS Program and Mobile Experience Center
    • Mobile Experience Center (MEC) – part of Oncor’s customer education
    • MEC has been and will visit communities corresponding to AMS rollout (pre & post)
    • Regulatory and Legislative visits
    • Other venues include:
    Selected sponsorships
    State Fair of Texas, East Texas State Fair, Dallas Home & Garden Show
    See www.oncor.com for schedule under Technology & Reliability
  • Customer Education
  • Oncor’s Plans Include Ways to Enable Consumers to Make an Impact Soon
    • Surcharge will include funding in-home monitors to low income or hard to reach consumers
    Studies have shown that merely providing consumers with real time feedback can have up to a 5% impact on consumption
    • For those that attend the local MEC events, Oncor will give away Compact Fluorescent Lamps
    • Monthly savings from replacing one 100 W incandescent bulb with a CFL will fund the surcharge
  • Home Area Network (HAN)
    • Multiple products have been tested in the Oncor Test Lab
    • Text messaging
    • Load control / demand response
    • Pricing signals
    • Functions available now
    • Device availability limited
  • Deployment Rollout
    Non-metro Areas
    ‘12
    ‘10
    ‘12
    ‘12
    ‘12
    ‘11
    ‘08
    ‘12
    ‘11
    ‘12
    ‘10
    ‘11
    ‘09
    ‘09
    ‘10
    Metro Areas
    ‘12
    ‘10
    ‘11
    ‘09
    ‘09
    ‘12
    ‘12
    ‘09
    ‘10
    ‘11
  • What are your questions?
    www.smartmetertexas.com
    www.smarttexas.com
    www.twitter.com/smarttexas
    www.facebook.com/smarttexas
    www.oncor.com